Data

Water clarity and water quality, catchment to reef, Great Barrier Reef

Australian Institute of Marine Science
Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS)
Viewed: [[ro.stat.viewed]] Cited: [[ro.stat.cited]] Accessed: [[ro.stat.accessed]]
ctx_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info%3Aofi%2Ffmt%3Akev%3Amtx%3Adc&rfr_id=info%3Asid%2FANDS&rft_id=http://geo.aims.gov.au/geonetwork/geonetwork/srv/eng/search?uuid=273fd55d-84d3-4781-a193-ab58695cb4c4&rft.title=Water clarity and water quality, catchment to reef, Great Barrier Reef&rft.identifier=http://geo.aims.gov.au/geonetwork/geonetwork/srv/eng/search?uuid=273fd55d-84d3-4781-a193-ab58695cb4c4&rft.publisher=Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS)&rft.description=This research focused on defining improved water quality guideline trigger values for the GBR Water Quality Guidelines, by identifying measures of changes in coral reefs that are specifically related to recent and past exposure to changing water quality from altered catchments. An analysis of spatial and seasonal water quality conditions in six NRM regions on the GBR assessed the relationships between water quality and reef ecosystem health. Trigger values for water quality were determined to protect ecosystem health and model based predictions for ecosystem benefits for improvements should the trigger values by implemented. Analysis was conducted for the six NRM regions: Burnett Mary, Fitzroy, Mackay Whitsundays, Burdekin Dry Tropics, Wet Tropics, and Cape York NRM. This included nine water quality parameters were analysed: Secchi depth, chlorophyll, suspended solids, particulate, dissolved and total nitrogen, and particulate, dissolved and total phosphorus. Four groups of biota were used as proxies for reef ecosystem status and biodiversity: these were macroalgal cover, species richness of hard corals, and species richness of phototrophic and heterotrophic octocorals. Two separate approaches were used to define water quality guideline trigger values: (i) The modelled relationships between the condition of reef biota (ii) The analyses of the spatial distribution of water quality. The chlorophyll and nutrient data were collected since 1976, and between 1992 and 2006 as part of the Long-Term Chlorophyll Monitoring program, and of the Reef Plan Marine Monitoring program since 2005. The Secchi data were collected by a consortium of people from AIMS, DPIF, and members of the Reef Plan Marine Monitoring Program since 1976. These data are available through the data links on this page (eAtlas). The hard coral biodiversity data were collected between 1994 and 2001. The study was funded by the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority, the Australian Institute of Marine Science and the Australian Government’s Marine and Tropical Sciences Research FacilityMaintenance and Update Frequency: asNeededStatement: See report De’ath G, Fabricius KE (2008) Water quality of the Great Barrier Reef: distributions, effects on reef biota and trigger values for the protection of ecosystem health. Final Report to the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority. Australian Institute of Marine Science, Townsville. (104 pp.), for futher information on data quality and processed used.&rft.creator=Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS) &rft.date=2024&rft.coverage=142.49267578125003,-10.811724143275514 143.98681640625003,-10.466205555063867 144.16259765625003,-11.888853082975956 143.98681640625003,-12.790374787613588 144.60205078125003,-14.115267411122709 145.78857421875003,-14.541049898060388 145.96435546875003,-16.235772090429844 146.57958984375003,-17.035777250427184 147.01904296875003,-18.041421221891937 150.35888671875003,-19.828725387681168 151.54541015625003,-20.817741019786485 152.86376953125003,-21.105000275382054 152.55615234375,-24.946219074360084 150.44677734375003,-22.248428704383613 148.64501953125003,-20.24158281954221 146.18408203125003,-18.70869162255995 145.08544921875003,-14.966013251567151 143.98681640625003,-14.541049898060388 142.58056640625003,-10.811724143275514 142.49267578125003,-10.811724143275514 142.58056640625003,-10.811724143275514 143.98681640625003,-14.541049898060388 145.08544921875003,-14.966013251567151 146.18408203125003,-18.70869162255995 148.64501953125003,-20.24158281954221 150.44677734375003,-22.248428704383613 152.55615234375,-24.946219074360084 152.86376953125003,-21.105000275382054 151.54541015625003,-20.817741019786485 150.35888671875003,-19.828725387681168 147.01904296875003,-18.041421221891937 146.57958984375003,-17.035777250427184 145.96435546875003,-16.235772090429844 145.78857421875003,-14.541049898060388 144.60205078125003,-14.115267411122709 143.98681640625003,-12.790374787613588 144.16259765625003,-11.888853082975956 143.98681640625003,-10.466205555063867 142.49267578125003,-10.811724143275514&rft_rights=All AIMS data, products and services are provided as is and AIMS does not warrant their fitness for a particular purpose or non-infringement. While AIMS has made every reasonable effort to ensure high quality of the data, products and services, to the extent permitted by law the data, products and services are provided without any warranties of any kind, either expressed or implied, including without limitation any implied warranties of title, merchantability, and fitness for a particular purpose or non-infringement. AIMS make no representation or warranty that the data, products and services are accurate, complete, reliable or current. To the extent permitted by law, AIMS exclude all liability to any person arising directly or indirectly from the use of the data, products and services.&rft_rights=The data was collected under contract between AIMS and another party(s). Specific agreements for access and use of the data shall be negotiated separately. Contact the AIMS Data Centre (adc@aims.gov.au) for further information&rft_rights=Resource Usage:Use of the AIMS data is for not-for-profit applications only. All other users shall seek permission for use by contacting AIMS. Acknowledgements as prescribed must be clearly set out in the user's formal communications or publications.Access Constraint: intellectualPropertyRightsUse Constraint: intellectualPropertyRightsSecurity classification code: unclassifiedMetadata Usage:Access Constraint: intellectualPropertyRightsUse Constraint: intellectualPropertyRightsSecurity classification code: unclassified&rft_subject=oceans&rft_subject=Secchi depth&rft.type=dataset&rft.language=English Access the data

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All AIMS data, products and services are provided "as is" and AIMS does not warrant their fitness for a particular purpose or non-infringement. While AIMS has made every reasonable effort to ensure high quality of the data, products and services, to the extent permitted by law the data, products and services are provided without any warranties of any kind, either expressed or implied, including without limitation any implied warranties of title, merchantability, and fitness for a particular purpose or non-infringement. AIMS make no representation or warranty that the data, products and services are accurate, complete, reliable or current. To the extent permitted by law, AIMS exclude all liability to any person arising directly or indirectly from the use of the data, products and services.

The data was collected under contract between AIMS and another party(s). Specific agreements for access and use of the data shall be negotiated separately. Contact the AIMS Data Centre (adc@aims.gov.au) for further information

Resource Usage:Use of the AIMS data is for not-for-profit applications only. All other users shall seek permission for use by contacting AIMS. Acknowledgements as prescribed must be clearly set out in the user's formal communications or publications.Access Constraint: intellectualPropertyRightsUse Constraint: intellectualPropertyRightsSecurity classification code: unclassifiedMetadata Usage:Access Constraint: intellectualPropertyRightsUse Constraint: intellectualPropertyRightsSecurity classification code: unclassified

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Open

Contact Information

reception@aims.gov.au
adc@aims.gov.au

Brief description

This research focused on defining improved water quality guideline trigger values for the GBR Water Quality Guidelines, by identifying measures of changes in coral reefs that are specifically related to recent and past exposure to changing water quality from altered catchments. An analysis of spatial and seasonal water quality conditions in six NRM regions on the GBR assessed the relationships between water quality and reef ecosystem health. Trigger values for water quality were determined to protect ecosystem health and model based predictions for ecosystem benefits for improvements should the trigger values by implemented.


Analysis was conducted for the six NRM regions: Burnett Mary, Fitzroy, Mackay Whitsundays, Burdekin Dry Tropics, Wet Tropics, and Cape York NRM. This included nine water quality parameters were analysed: Secchi depth, chlorophyll, suspended solids, particulate, dissolved and total nitrogen, and particulate, dissolved and total phosphorus. Four groups of biota were used as proxies for reef ecosystem status and biodiversity: these were macroalgal cover, species richness of hard corals, and species richness of phototrophic and heterotrophic octocorals.


Two separate approaches were used to define water quality guideline trigger values:


(i) The modelled relationships between the condition of reef biota


(ii) The analyses of the spatial distribution of water quality.


The chlorophyll and nutrient data were collected since 1976, and between 1992 and 2006 as part of the Long-Term Chlorophyll Monitoring program, and of the Reef Plan Marine Monitoring program since 2005.


The Secchi data were collected by a consortium of people from AIMS, DPIF, and members of the Reef Plan Marine Monitoring Program since 1976. These data are available through the data links on this page (eAtlas).


The hard coral biodiversity data were collected between 1994 and 2001.


The study was funded by the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority, the Australian Institute of Marine Science and the Australian Government’s Marine and Tropical Sciences Research Facility

Lineage

Maintenance and Update Frequency: asNeeded
Statement: See report De’ath G, Fabricius KE (2008) Water quality of the Great Barrier Reef: distributions, effects on reef biota and trigger values for the protection of ecosystem health. Final Report to the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority. Australian Institute of Marine Science, Townsville. (104 pp.), for futher information on data quality and processed used.

Notes

Credit
Fabricius, Katharina E, Dr (Principal Investigator)

Modified: 13 03 2024

This dataset is part of a larger collection

142.49268,-10.81172 143.98682,-10.46621 144.1626,-11.88885 143.98682,-12.79037 144.60205,-14.11527 145.78857,-14.54105 145.96436,-16.23577 146.57959,-17.03578 147.01904,-18.04142 150.35889,-19.82873 151.54541,-20.81774 152.86377,-21.105 152.55615,-24.94622 150.44678,-22.24843 148.64502,-20.24158 146.18408,-18.70869 145.08545,-14.96601 143.98682,-14.54105 142.58057,-10.81172 142.49268,-10.81172

147.67822265625,-17.706212314712

Subjects

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Other Information
Harrington LM, Fabricius KE, Eaglesham G and Negri AP (2005) Synergistic effects of diuron and sedimentation on photosynthetic yields and survival of crustose coralline algae. Marine Pollution Bulletin. 51: 415-427.

local : 11068/6846

Fabricius KE and Metzner J (2004) Scleractinian walls of mouths: predation on coral larvae by corals. Coral Reefs. 23: 245-248.

local : 11068/7028

Fabricius KE and De'ath AG (2001) Environmental factors associated with the spatial distribution of crustose coralline algae on the Great Barrier Reef. Coral Reefs. 19: 303-309.

local : 11068/5814

e-atlas Secchi disk depth

uri : https://eatlas.org.au/data/uuid/450537e4-c954-41d8-b094-40a13393c59b

Fabricius KE, Wild C, Wolanski EJ and Abele D (2003) Effects of transparent exopolymer particles and muddy terrigenous sediments on the survival of hard coral recruits. Estuarine Coastal and Shelf Science. 57: 613-621.

local : 11068/6532

Philipp E and Fabricius KE (2003) Photophysiological stress in scleractinian corals in response to short-term sedimentation. Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology. 287: 57-78.

local : 11068/6428

Candidate bioindicator measures to monitor exposure to changing water quality on the Great Barrier Reef. Interim Report.: Fabricius KE, Uthicke S, Cooper TF, Humphrey CA, De'ath AG and Mellors J (2007) Candidate bioindicator measures to monitor exposure to changing water quality on the Great Barrier Reef. Interim Report.. Catchment to Reef Research Program - CRC Reef and Rainforest CRC and Australian Institute of Marine Science. 225 p.

local : articleId=7447

Fabricius KE (2005) Effects of terrestrial runoff on the ecology of corals and coral reefs: review and synthesis. Marine Pollution Bulletin. 50: 125-146.

local : 11068/6838

Fabricius KE and De'ath AG (2004) Identifying ecological change and its causes: a case study on coral reefs. Ecological Applications. 14: 1448-1465.

local : 11068/6824

Brodie JE, Fabricius KE, De'ath AG and Okaji K (2005) Are increased nutrient inputs responsible for more outbreaks of crown-of-thorns starfish? An appraisal of the evidence. Marine Pollution Bulletin. 51:266-278.

local : 11068/6904

De'ath AG and Fabricius KE (2000) Classification and regression trees: a powerful yet simple technique for the analysis of complex ecological data. Ecology. 81: 3178-3192.

local : 11068/5812

Fine Sediment Budget On An Inner Shelf Island Of The Great Barrier Reef

local : 11068/7085

e-atlas Water quality guidelines for the Great Barrier Reef

uri : https://eatlas.org.au/data/uuid/b1544bb0-8d90-4241-aba1-efab9fca88cb

Gradients in water column nutrients, sediments, irradiance and coral reef development in the Whitsunday Region, central Great Barrier Reef: Cooper TF, Uthicke S, Humphrey CA and Fabricius KE (2007) Gradients in water column nutrients, sediments, irradiance and coral reef development in the Whitsunday Region, central Great Barrier Reef. Estuarine Coastal and Shelf Science 74: 458-470.

local : articleId=7458

Temporal dynamics in coral bioindicators for water quality on coastal coral reefs of the Great Barrier Reef: Cooper TF, Ridd P, Ulstrup KE, Humphrey CA, Slivkoff MM and Fabricius KE (2008) Temporal dynamics in coral bioindicators for water quality on coastal coral reefs of the Great Barrier Reef. Marine and Freshwater Research 59: 703-716.

local : articleId=7819

Water Quality Dataset, Great Barrier Reef

uri : https://apps.aims.gov.au/metadata/view/0828edb9-b7b9-47f8-b4b6-43fa73a58867

e-atlas Water column chlorophyll

uri : https://eatlas.org.au/data/uuid/df7012eb-a23f-4cf2-b92d-6fff77718987

Anthony KRN and Fabricius KE (2000) Shifting roles of heterotrophy and autotrophy in coral energetics under varying turbidity. Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology. 252: 221-253.

local : 11068/5813

Fabricius KE and Wolanski EJ (2000) Rapid smothering of coral organisms by muddy marine snow. Estuarine Coastal and Shelf Science. 50: 115-120.

local : 11068/1540

Water quality of the Great Barrier Reef: distributions, effects on reef biota and trigger values for the protection of ecosystem health: De'ath G and Fabricius KE (2008) Water quality of the Great Barrier Reef: distributions, effects on reef biota and trigger values for the protection of ecosystem health. Research Publication No.89. Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority. 104 p.

local : articleId=7825

Negri AP, Vollhardt C, Humphrey CA, Heyward AJ, Jones RJ, Eaglesham G and Fabricius KE (2005) Effects of the herbicide diuron on the early life history stages of coral. Marine Pollution Bulletin. 51: 370-383.

local : 11068/6845

Identifiers
  • global : 273fd55d-84d3-4781-a193-ab58695cb4c4