Data

University of Sydney Art Collections

The University of Sydney
Sydney University Museums (Managed by) The University of Sydney (Associated with)
Viewed: [[ro.stat.viewed]] Cited: [[ro.stat.cited]] Accessed: [[ro.stat.accessed]]
ctx_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info%3Aofi%2Ffmt%3Akev%3Amtx%3Adc&rfr_id=info%3Asid%2FANDS&rft_id=http://sydney.edu.au/museums/collections/art-collection.shtml&rft.title=University of Sydney Art Collections&rft.identifier=http://sydney.edu.au/museums/collections/art-collection.shtml&rft.publisher=The University of Sydney&rft.description=The University of Sydney Art Collection began with the foundation of the University itself in 1850. Among the first acquisitions of the new institution were a clock, a portrait of Sir Francis Forbes, two maps, two blackboards with stands and a pair of large globes. One of the first donors of works of art was Sir Charles Nicholson, who together with Francis Merewether and William Charles Wentworth was one of the founders. Nicholson was active in cultural, political and business affairs of the Colony and had a significant private art collection. In 1865 he gave the University some 30 paintings, tapestries, sculptures and portrait medallions. There are more than of 2,600 artworks by Australian, Asian and European artists in the collection, mainly acquired by bequest, gift, and commission. However it is the depth and diversity of the collection that makes it unique - Chinese art, Japanese woodcuts, European paintings, and a range of media - including paintings, prints, watercolours, drawings, textiles, photography, decorative arts, sculptures and ceramics. Australian Art The Australian collection represents the development of art from colonial times to the present day. Many well-known historical and contemporary artists are represented including Arthur Streeton, Sidney Nolan, Arthur Boyd, William Dobell, Russell Drysdale, Donald Friend, Jeffrey Smart, Lloyd Rees, James Gleeson and Margaret Olley. Portraiture is a significant genre and includes portraits of academics and patrons commissioned since the foundation years of the colony and the University. Modernist painters of the 1920s and 1930s Margaret Preston, Grace Cossington Smith, Roland Wakelin, Frank Hinder, Grace Crowley, and Dorrit Black are also represented. Aboriginal Art The University of Sydney Art Collection has a small number of bark paintings, woven baskets and implements from the Northern Territory. These include bark paintings that portray aspects of spiritual and ceremonial life of Eastern Arnhem Land. There are Hermannsburg watercolours from the 1940s by Walter Ebatarinja and the Pareroultja brothers Edwin, Rubin and Otto of the Western Arrernte linguistic group. The current aim is to increase the representation of contemporary and historical works. Work by England Bangala, Roy Burnyila and Jacky Tjakamarra have recently been donated by Dr David Edwards. East Asian Art The M J Morrissey Bequest Fund of 1984, established in memory of Professor Arthur Sadler provides funds to purchase East Asian art. In 2000 the Morrissey Committee began purchasing contemporary Chinese art in the medium of printmaking. The collection of Japanese wood block prints includes prints from the late 19th century and early 20th century, with a specialist group of forty Hanga creative prints made between 1920 and 1945 by artists such as Onchi Kôshirô, Takehisa Yumeji, Kawanishi Hide, Inakaki Tomo-o, Kawakami Sumio, Ono Tadashige and Hiratsuka Un'ichi. There is also an historical collection of a hundred Chinese and Japanese ceramics from individual bequests and donations. European Art More than 30 European works were given to the Art Collection by Sir Charles Nicholson, first Chancellor of the University in 1865. It represents artists of significance in the traditions of western European art such as Flemish artist Michiel Coxcie and Swiss born painter Angelica Kauffman. Since then individual donors have continued to give art works by Eugène Boudin, Giovanni Piranesi, Francisco Goya, Georges Roualt, Joan Miro, and Marc Chagall. There is also a small collection of 19th century decorative silverware and jewellery.&rft.creator=Anonymous&rft.date=2012&rft_subject=Portraiture&rft_subject=Textiles&rft_subject=Public art&rft_subject=Artworks&rft_subject=Terracotta and ceramic artefacts&rft_subject=Works on paper&rft_subject=Australian&rft_subject=Australian Indigenous - Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander&rft_subject=European&rft_subject=East Asian&rft_subject=China&rft_subject=Japan&rft_subject=Fine Arts (incl. Sculpture and Painting)&rft_subject=STUDIES IN CREATIVE ARTS AND WRITING&rft_subject=VISUAL ARTS AND CRAFTS&rft_subject=Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Performing Arts&rft_subject=PERFORMING ARTS AND CREATIVE WRITING&rft_subject=Art Criticism&rft_subject=ART THEORY AND CRITICISM&rft_subject=Art History&rft_subject=Art Theory&rft_subject=Visual Cultures&rft.type=dataset&rft.language=English Access the data

Access:

Other view details

The University Art Gallery is open to the public and entry is free. Contact Sydney University Museums to arrange access to a particular item or collection.
http://sydney.edu.au/museums/collections/art-collection.shtml

Contact Information

Postal Address:
The University Art Gallery, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006



Brief description

The University of Sydney Art Collection began with the foundation of the University itself in 1850. Among the first acquisitions of the new institution were a "clock, a portrait of Sir Francis Forbes, two maps, two blackboards with stands and a pair of large globes".

One of the first donors of works of art was Sir Charles Nicholson, who together with Francis Merewether and William Charles Wentworth was one of the founders. Nicholson was active in cultural, political and business affairs of the Colony and had a significant private art collection. In 1865 he gave the University some 30 paintings, tapestries, sculptures and portrait medallions.

There are more than of 2,600 artworks by Australian, Asian and European artists in the collection, mainly acquired by bequest, gift, and commission. However it is the depth and diversity of the collection that makes it unique - Chinese art, Japanese woodcuts, European paintings, and a range of media - including paintings, prints, watercolours, drawings, textiles, photography, decorative arts, sculptures and ceramics.

Australian Art

The Australian collection represents the development of art from colonial times to the present day. Many well-known historical and contemporary artists are represented including Arthur Streeton, Sidney Nolan, Arthur Boyd, William Dobell, Russell Drysdale, Donald Friend, Jeffrey Smart, Lloyd Rees, James Gleeson and Margaret Olley. Portraiture is a significant genre and includes portraits of academics and patrons commissioned since the foundation years of the colony and the University. Modernist painters of the 1920s and 1930s Margaret Preston, Grace Cossington Smith, Roland Wakelin, Frank Hinder, Grace Crowley, and Dorrit Black are also represented.

Aboriginal Art

The University of Sydney Art Collection has a small number of bark paintings, woven baskets and implements from the Northern Territory. These include bark paintings that portray aspects of spiritual and ceremonial life of Eastern Arnhem Land. There are Hermannsburg watercolours from the 1940s by Walter Ebatarinja and the Pareroultja brothers Edwin, Rubin and Otto of the Western Arrernte linguistic group. The current aim is to increase the representation of contemporary and historical works. Work by England Bangala, Roy Burnyila and Jacky Tjakamarra have recently been donated by Dr David Edwards.

East Asian Art

The M J Morrissey Bequest Fund of 1984, established in memory of Professor Arthur Sadler provides funds to purchase East Asian art. In 2000 the Morrissey Committee began purchasing contemporary Chinese art in the medium of printmaking. The collection of Japanese wood block prints includes prints from the late 19th century and early 20th century, with a specialist group of forty Hanga creative prints made between 1920 and 1945 by artists such as Onchi Kôshirô, Takehisa Yumeji, Kawanishi Hide, Inakaki Tomo-o, Kawakami Sumio, Ono Tadashige and Hiratsuka Un'ichi. There is also an historical collection of a hundred Chinese and Japanese ceramics from individual bequests and donations.

European Art

More than 30 European works were given to the Art Collection by Sir Charles Nicholson, first Chancellor of the University in 1865. It represents artists of significance in the traditions of western European art such as Flemish artist Michiel Coxcie and Swiss born painter Angelica Kauffman. Since then individual donors have continued to give art works by Eugène Boudin, Giovanni Piranesi, Francisco Goya, Georges Roualt, Joan Miro, and Marc Chagall. There is also a small collection of 19th century decorative silverware and jewellery.

This dataset is part of a larger collection

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