Dataset

Spring point locations compiled for the Nulla Basalt Province

Geoscience Australia
Lai, E.C.S. ; Dixon-Jain, P. ; Kilgour, P.L. ; Ransley, T. R.
Viewed: [[ro.stat.viewed]] Cited: [[ro.stat.cited]] Accessed: [[ro.stat.accessed]]
ctx_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info%3Aofi%2Ffmt%3Akev%3Amtx%3Adc&rfr_id=info%3Asid%2FANDS&rft_id=http://pid.geoscience.gov.au/dataset/ga/133457&rft.title=Spring point locations compiled for the Nulla Basalt Province&rft.identifier=http://pid.geoscience.gov.au/dataset/ga/133457&rft.description=Summary Spring point locations compiled for the Nulla Basalt Province A compilation of spring locations as identified through various methods, including existing Queensland Springs Database, topographic mapping, fieldwork visits, landholder citizen scientist mapping, and inspection for neighbouring similar features in Google Earth. This compilation has had locations adjusted through inspecting visible imagery and elevation data to identify the likely positions of springs at higher resolution.This dataset is a compilation of numerous methods to identify spring locations as point features around the Nulla Basalt Province, as part of the Upper Burdekin groundwater project within Exploring for the Future. In addition, the locations of these points have been manually altered through detailed analysis of high resolution imagery and elevation data acquired as part of the same project. This compilation of spring locations is not considered an exhaustive suite of springs, as it is acknowledged that other clusters could be found in areas not examined thoroughly. The presence of springs, and the initial locations for these springs, are derived from several methods: 1. Spring point locations from Queensland Springs Database (Queensland Herbarium 2016) 2. Spring locations identified in NATMAP Topographic Mapping 1:250,000 scale map sheets (Geoscience Australia 2008) 3. Locations of springs visited during hydrochemical sampling fieldwork campaigns as part of the project, as recorded by GPS devices carried by Geoscience Australia field officers. These included springs alluded to by landholders. 4. Locations marked by a landholder citizen scientist (at Felspar Station) identifying locations known to be springs on an A0 paper map 5. Locations of additional features identified by inspecting Google Earth for areas in similar appearance to those noted above, as conducted by Queensland Department of Environment and Science officers. These five sets of spring locations were compiled together, and duplicates merged into a single ID. A manual process of refining the spring locations was undertaken for all points by an officer from Geoscience Australia. This pinpointing process involved examining visible imagery (e.g. ESRI World Imagery and LiDAR RGB imagery) in conjunction with digital elevation models and derived slope and aspect rasters (SRTM 1s and high-resolution LiDAR where available). The locations of watercourses, slope changes, and vegetation patterns suggested the likely positions of springs. This produced a new set of coordinates. A shapefile was created as a point dataset based on these coordinates chosen, allowing further details to be provided in distinct columns for an attribute table. The attribute table describes the source datasets for these inputs, with the ID from these marked where relevant. Blank cells in these columns indicate that this spring was not derived from this dataset. - QldSprDb = the spring ID from the Queensland Springs Database - Nul_JH = the spring ID from the Queensland Department of Environment and Science dataset - Felspar = the spring ID from the landholder at Felspar Station - Toomba = the sample IDs for springs visited by Geoscience Australia staff conducting fieldwork at Toomba Station - Topo250k = spring names identified from the NATMAP topographic mapping&rft.creator=Lai, E.C.S. &rft.creator=Dixon-Jain, P. &rft.creator=Kilgour, P.L. &rft.creator=Ransley, T. R. &rft.date=2020&rft.coverage=northlimit=-18.5629; southlimit=-21.8615; westlimit=144.50; eastLimit=146.35&rft.coverage=northlimit=-18.5629; southlimit=-21.8615; westlimit=144.50; eastLimit=146.35&rft_rights=Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International Licence http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0&rft_subject=geoscientificInformation&rft_subject=EARTH SCIENCES&rft_subject=GEOLOGY&rft_subject=Exploring for the Future&rft_subject=EFTF&rft_subject=Upper Burdekin&rft_subject=Nulla Basalt&rft_subject=hydrogeology&rft_subject=discharge&rft_subject=groundwater&rft_subject=spring&rft_subject=Published_External&rft.type=dataset&rft.language=English Access the data

Licence & Rights:

Open Licence view details
CC-BY

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International Licence
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0

Access:

Open

Contact Information

clientservices@ga.gov.au

Brief description

Summary

Spring point locations compiled for the Nulla Basalt Province

A compilation of spring locations as identified through various methods, including existing Queensland Springs Database, topographic mapping, fieldwork visits, landholder citizen scientist mapping, and inspection for neighbouring similar features in Google Earth. This compilation has had locations adjusted through inspecting visible imagery and elevation data to identify the likely positions of springs at higher resolution.

Lineage

This dataset is a compilation of numerous methods to identify spring locations as point features around the Nulla Basalt Province, as part of the Upper Burdekin groundwater project within Exploring for the Future. In addition, the locations of these points have been manually altered through detailed analysis of high resolution imagery and elevation data acquired as part of the same project. This compilation of spring locations is not considered an exhaustive suite of springs, as it is acknowledged that other clusters could be found in areas not examined thoroughly.

The presence of springs, and the initial locations for these springs, are derived from several methods:

1. Spring point locations from Queensland Springs Database (Queensland Herbarium 2016)

2. Spring locations identified in NATMAP Topographic Mapping 1:250,000 scale map sheets (Geoscience Australia 2008)

3. Locations of springs visited during hydrochemical sampling fieldwork campaigns as part of the project, as recorded by GPS devices carried by Geoscience Australia field officers. These included springs alluded to by landholders.

4. Locations marked by a landholder citizen scientist (at Felspar Station) identifying locations known to be springs on an A0 paper map

5. Locations of additional features identified by inspecting Google Earth for areas in similar appearance to those noted above, as conducted by Queensland Department of Environment and Science officers.

These five sets of spring locations were compiled together, and duplicates merged into a single ID. A manual process of refining the spring locations was undertaken for all points by an officer from Geoscience Australia. This pinpointing process involved examining visible imagery (e.g. ESRI World Imagery and LiDAR RGB imagery) in conjunction with digital elevation models and derived slope and aspect rasters (SRTM 1s and high-resolution LiDAR where available). The locations of watercourses, slope changes, and vegetation patterns suggested the likely positions of springs. This produced a new set of coordinates. A shapefile was created as a point dataset based on these coordinates chosen, allowing further details to be provided in distinct columns for an attribute table.

The attribute table describes the source datasets for these inputs, with the ID from these marked where relevant. Blank cells in these columns indicate that this spring was not derived from this dataset.

- QldSprDb = the spring ID from the Queensland Springs Database

- Nul_JH = the spring ID from the Queensland Department of Environment and Science dataset

- Felspar = the spring ID from the landholder at Felspar Station

- Toomba = the sample IDs for springs visited by Geoscience Australia staff conducting fieldwork at Toomba Station

- Topo250k = spring names identified from the NATMAP topographic mapping

Issued: 24 04 2020

Click to explore relationships graph

148.3594,-18.5629 148.3594,-21.8615 143.2617,-21.8615 143.2617,-18.5629 148.3594,-18.5629

145.81055,-20.2122

text: northlimit=-18.5629; southlimit=-21.8615; westlimit=144.50; eastLimit=146.35

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Identifiers
  • global : a6073cbb-97c7-4a89-b943-b9d5b330367c