Data

Simpson Desert Remote camera trap data

Terrestrial Ecosystem Research Network
Greenville, Aaron
Viewed: [[ro.stat.viewed]] Cited: [[ro.stat.cited]] Accessed: [[ro.stat.accessed]]
ctx_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info%3Aofi%2Ffmt%3Akev%3Amtx%3Adc&rfr_id=info%3Asid%2FANDS&rft_id=http://geonetwork.tern.org.au/geonetwork/srv/eng/catalog.search#/metadata/cb806c4b-2641-4da9-925e-7fbccf3093e0&rft.title=Simpson Desert Remote camera trap data&rft.identifier=http://geonetwork.tern.org.au/geonetwork/srv/eng/catalog.search#/metadata/cb806c4b-2641-4da9-925e-7fbccf3093e0&rft.publisher=Terrestrial Ecosystem Research Network&rft.description=This dataset contains the number (count) of dingo, red fox and feral cat photographs from remote camera traps in the Simpson Desert. Note, spatial location for the sites has been desensitized. Please contact the data author for site details.Remote camera traps: To survey the predators and their rodent prey, we placed 25 remote cameras (24 Moultrie i40 and one Reconyx Rapid- Fire) 110 km apart next to access tracks in spinifex habitat in the interdune swales. Two years of continuous monitoring were required to capture any lag (up to 12 months, see above) in changes in predator numbers following irruptions of prey (Fig. S1). Cameras were mounted atop 1.5-m-high metal stakes, and angled at ~10° so the field of view covered the track; their locations were assumed to be independent (spatial autocorrelation, Moran's dingo I = 0.15, P = 0.22; red fox I = 0.31, P = 0.14; feral cat I = 0.33, P = 0.06). Cameras were active from April 2010 to April 2012 and downloaded 34 times a year. Each photograph was tagged with the site name, camera identification number, download trip, moon phase, species and number of individuals recorded, and the tags written to the exif data of each file (jpeg) using EXIFPro 2.0 (Kowalski and Kowalski 2012). EXIFPro 2.0 was used to database the photographs and export the exif data as a text file for analysis. To ensure independence, a delay of 1 min was programmed on-camera between each trigger, and multiple photographs of the same presumptive individual (photographs taken &rft.creator=Greenville, Aaron &rft.date=2022&rft.edition=1&rft.relation=https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00442-014-2977-8&rft.coverage=IBRA region: Simpson Desert, Queensland, Australia.&rft.coverage=northlimit=-22.98337; southlimit=-24.05117; westlimit=137.96307; eastLimit=138.5069; projection=EPSG:3577&rft_rights=Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International Licence http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0&rft_rights=TERN services are provided on an as-is and as available basis. Users use any TERN services at their discretion and risk. They will be solely responsible for any damage or loss whatsoever that results from such use including use of any data obtained through TERN and any analysis performed using the TERN infrastructure. <br />Web links to and from external, third party websites should not be construed as implying any relationships with and/or endorsement of the external site or its content by TERN. <br /><br />Please advise any work or publications that use this data via the online form at https://www.tern.org.au/research-publications/#reporting&rft_rights=Please cite this dataset as {Author} ({PublicationYear}). {Title}. {Version, as appropriate}. Terrestrial Ecosystem Research Network. Dataset. {Identifier}.&rft_rights=(C)2017 University of Sydney. Rights owned by University of Sydney.&rft_subject=biota&rft_subject=ANIMALS/VERTEBRATES&rft_subject=EARTH SCIENCE&rft_subject=BIOLOGICAL CLASSIFICATION&rft_subject=ANIMAL ECOLOGY AND BEHAVIOR&rft_subject=AGRICULTURE&rft_subject=ANIMAL SCIENCE&rft_subject=Vertebrate Biology&rft_subject=BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES&rft_subject=ZOOLOGY&rft_subject=Conservation and Biodiversity&rft_subject=ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES&rft_subject=ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE AND MANAGEMENT&rft_subject=Environmental assessment and monitoring&rft_subject=animal presence (Unitless)&rft_subject=Unitless&rft_subject=100 km - < 250 km or approximately 1 degree - < 2.5 degrees&rft_subject=Monthly - < Annual&rft_subject=Dingoes&rft_subject=Feral Cats&rft_subject=Foxes&rft_subject=Canis dingo&rft_subject=Felis catus&rft_subject=Vulpes vulpes&rft.type=dataset&rft.language=English Access the data

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Open Licence view details
CC-BY

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International Licence
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0

TERN services are provided on an "as-is" and "as available" basis. Users use any TERN services at their discretion and risk. They will be solely responsible for any damage or loss whatsoever that results from such use including use of any data obtained through TERN and any analysis performed using the TERN infrastructure.
Web links to and from external, third party websites should not be construed as implying any relationships with and/or endorsement of the external site or its content by TERN.

Please advise any work or publications that use this data via the online form at https://www.tern.org.au/research-publications/#reporting

Please cite this dataset as {Author} ({PublicationYear}). {Title}. {Version, as appropriate}. Terrestrial Ecosystem Research Network. Dataset. {Identifier}.

(C)2017 University of Sydney. Rights owned by University of Sydney.

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unclassified

Contact Information

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Building 1019, 80 Meiers Rd
QLD 4068
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Brief description

This dataset contains the number (count) of dingo, red fox and feral cat photographs from remote camera traps in the Simpson Desert. Note, spatial location for the sites has been desensitized. Please contact the data author for site details.

Lineage

Remote camera traps: To survey the predators and their rodent prey, we placed 25 remote cameras (24 Moultrie i40 and one Reconyx Rapid- Fire) 110 km apart next to access tracks in spinifex habitat in the interdune swales. Two years of continuous monitoring were required to capture any lag (up to 12 months, see above) in changes in predator numbers following irruptions of prey (Fig. S1). Cameras were mounted atop 1.5-m-high metal stakes, and angled at ~10° so the field of view covered the track; their locations were assumed to be independent (spatial autocorrelation, Moran's dingo I = 0.15, P = 0.22; red fox I = 0.31, P = 0.14; feral cat I = 0.33, P = 0.06). Cameras were active from April 2010 to April 2012 and downloaded 34 times a year. Each photograph was tagged with the site name, camera identification number, download trip, moon phase, species and number of individuals recorded, and the tags written to the exif data of each file (jpeg) using EXIFPro 2.0 (Kowalski and Kowalski 2012). EXIFPro 2.0 was used to database the photographs and export the exif data as a text file for analysis. To ensure independence, a delay of 1 min was programmed on-camera between each trigger, and multiple photographs of the same presumptive individual (photographs taken <2 min apart) were removed prior to analysis. This resulted in a total of at least 3 min between photographs. Histograms were inspected for each species to confirm that this was an appropriate breakpoint.

Notes

Credit
We at TERN acknowledge the Traditional Owners and Custodians throughout Australia, New Zealand and all nations. We honour their profound connections to land, water, biodiversity and culture and pay our respects to their Elders past, present and emerging.

Created: 2010-04-01

Issued: 2022-09-27

Modified: 2014-07-14

Data time period: 2010-04-01 to 2012-04-01

This dataset is part of a larger collection

Click to explore relationships graph

138.5069,-22.98337 138.5069,-24.05117 137.96307,-24.05117 137.96307,-22.98337 138.5069,-22.98337

138.234985,-23.51727