Data

Shark depredation and behavioural interactions with fishing gear in a recreational fishery in Western Australia

Australian Institute of Marine Science
Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS) ; The University of Western Australia
Viewed: [[ro.stat.viewed]] Cited: [[ro.stat.cited]] Accessed: [[ro.stat.accessed]]
ctx_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info%3Aofi%2Ffmt%3Akev%3Amtx%3Adc&rfr_id=info%3Asid%2FANDS&rft_id=http://geo.aims.gov.au/geonetwork/geonetwork/srv/eng/search?uuid=e4bc90f5-56bc-4e87-b721-03a1f3ee86d0&rft.title=Shark depredation and behavioural interactions with fishing gear in a recreational fishery in Western Australia&rft.identifier=http://geo.aims.gov.au/geonetwork/geonetwork/srv/eng/search?uuid=e4bc90f5-56bc-4e87-b721-03a1f3ee86d0&rft.publisher=Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS)&rft.description=Shark depredation, whereby a shark consumes an animal caught by fishing gear, can cause higher mortality for target species, injury to sharks and the loss of catch and fishing gear. A critical first step towards potential mitigation is understanding this behaviour and the shark species involved, because the identity of depredating shark species is unknown in many fisheries, and behavioural dynamics of shark interactions with fishing gear are not well understood. We used line-mounted video cameras in a recreational fishery in the Ningaloo region of Western Australia to: (1) identify shark species responsible for depredation, (2) investigate behavioural interactions with fishing gear, (3) identify the prevalence of retained fishing gear in sharks and (4) quantify the influence of environmental variables and fishing methods on shark abundance during demersal fishing at 92 locations.\n The study was led by UWA (Jon Mitchell - then PhD student) and performed in the Ningaloo region of Western Australia.\n We mounted high-definition video cameras on fishing lines to monitor shark depredation events and interactions with fishing gear. We recorded location, number of lines in the water, whether fishing vessels were fishing at anchor vs. drifting, fishing depth, gear and bait type The influence of fishing methods and environmental variables on the abundance of sharks at each location was investigated. All data were collected on an ipad using the software application 'Collector for ArcGIS'.\n Video was analysed using EventMeasure.\nThe paper builds on previous research documented in:\n Mitchell JD, McLean DL, Collin SP, Langlois TJ (2018) Shark depredation in commercial and recreational fisheries Reviews in Fish Biology and Fisheries. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11160-018-9528-z Mitchell JD, McLean DL, Collin SP, Taylor S, Jackson G, Fisher R, Langlois TJ (2018) Quantifying shark depredation in a recreational fishery in the Ningaloo Marine Park and Exmouth Gulf, Western Australia. Marine Ecology Progress Series. 587:141-157&rft.creator=Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS) &rft.creator=The University of Western Australia &rft.date=2022&rft.coverage=northlimit=-21.619132728904592; southlimit=-23.87328034832418; westlimit=112.79388427734376; eastLimit=113.95294189453126&rft.coverage=northlimit=-21.619132728904592; southlimit=-23.87328034832418; westlimit=112.79388427734376; eastLimit=113.95294189453126&rft_subject=oceans&rft.type=dataset&rft.language=English Access the data

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Open

Contact Information

tim.langlois@uwa.edu.au

Brief description

Shark depredation, whereby a shark consumes an animal caught by fishing gear, can cause higher mortality for target species, injury to sharks and the loss of catch and fishing gear. A critical first step towards potential mitigation is understanding this behaviour and the shark species involved, because the identity of depredating shark species is unknown in many fisheries, and behavioural dynamics of shark interactions with fishing gear are not well understood. We used line-mounted video cameras in a recreational fishery in the Ningaloo region of Western Australia to: (1) identify shark species responsible for depredation, (2) investigate behavioural interactions with fishing gear, (3) identify the prevalence of retained fishing gear in sharks and (4) quantify the influence of environmental variables and fishing methods on shark abundance during demersal fishing at 92 locations.\n The study was led by UWA (Jon Mitchell - then PhD student) and performed in the Ningaloo region of Western Australia.\n We mounted high-definition video cameras on fishing lines to monitor shark depredation events and interactions with fishing gear. We recorded location, number of lines in the water, whether fishing vessels were fishing at anchor vs. drifting, fishing depth, gear and bait type The influence of fishing methods and environmental variables on the abundance of sharks at each location was investigated. All data were collected on an ipad using the software application 'Collector for ArcGIS'.\n Video was analysed using EventMeasure.\n

Lineage

The paper builds on previous research documented in:\n Mitchell JD, McLean DL, Collin SP, Langlois TJ (2018) Shark depredation in commercial and recreational fisheries Reviews in Fish Biology and Fisheries. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11160-018-9528-z Mitchell JD, McLean DL, Collin SP, Taylor S, Jackson G, Fisher R, Langlois TJ (2018) Quantifying shark depredation in a recreational fishery in the Ningaloo Marine Park and Exmouth Gulf, Western Australia. Marine Ecology Progress Series. 587:141-157

Notes

Credit
McLean, D. Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS)
Credit
Mitchell JD. The University of Western Australia
Credit
Langlois TJ. The University of Western Australia
Credit
Collin SP. La Trobe University

Modified: 06 10 2022

Click to explore relationships graph

113.95294189453,-21.619132728905 113.95294189453,-23.873280348324 112.79388427734,-23.873280348324 112.79388427734,-21.619132728905 113.95294189453,-21.619132728905

113.37341308593,-22.746206538615

text: northlimit=-21.619132728904592; southlimit=-23.87328034832418; westlimit=112.79388427734376; eastLimit=113.95294189453126

Subjects
oceans |

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Other Information
Mitchell JD, McLean DL, Collin SP, Langlois TJ (2019) Shark depredation and behavioural interactions with fishing gear in a recreational fishery in Western Australia. Marine Ecology Progress Series 616: 107-122

uri : http://epubs.aims.gov.au/handle/11068/15282

Identifiers
  • global : e4bc90f5-56bc-4e87-b721-03a1f3ee86d0