Data

Recovery of woody, not herbaceous native flora ten years post old-field restoration

Terrestrial Ecosystem Research Network
Parkhurst, Tina
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ctx_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info%3Aofi%2Ffmt%3Akev%3Amtx%3Adc&rfr_id=info%3Asid%2FANDS&rft_id=info:doi10.25901/c050-ca34&rft.title=Recovery of woody, not herbaceous native flora ten years post old-field restoration&rft.identifier=10.25901/c050-ca34&rft.publisher=Terrestrial Ecosystem Research Network&rft.description=We selected nine study sites, each incorporating three vegetation states: (a) fallow cropland, representing the restoration starting point, (b) planted old field (actively restored site), and (c) reference York gum (E. loxophleba) woodland. Plant species richness and cover All annual and perennial plant species were recorded in spring 2017 within each plot and identified to genus and species level where possible. Nomenclatures follow the Western Australian Herbarium (2017). A point intercept method previously demonstrated to provide objective and repeatable measures of cover (Godínez-Alvarez, Herrick, Mattocks, Toledo & Van Zee 2009; Prober, Standish & Wiehl 2011) was used to quantify cover of individual plant species, total vegetation cover and substrate types (i.e., bare ground, litter cover, plant cover). Ground cover, individual species, and canopy cover intercepting at every 2 m along four parallel, evenly spaced 50 m transects across each plot were recorded using a vertically placed dowel (8 mm wide, 2 m tall), resulting in 100 intercepting points per plot. For planted old fields, transects were placed parallel to planting rows, with two centred on rows and two centred between rows. This approximately represented the relative abundance of planted rows and non-planted inter-rows. If a species was recorded in the plot but did not intercept the dowel on any transect it was assigned 0.5 points. This method provided a measure of relative abundance (percentage cover) of plant species across the plot. To calculate species richness and cover across different life history and growth forms, species were classified into the following groups: total, native trees, native shrubs, native non – planted shrubs, native grasses, native perennial forbs, native annual forbs, exotic grasses and exotic annual forbs using the Western Australian Herbarium (2017) classification. Woody debris and leaf litter surveys Leaf-litter dry mass was estimated by collecting leaf-litter from five randomly placed 25 cm x 25 cm quadrats along two 50 m transects across each plot. Litter was stored in paper bags for transportation and then oven dried for 36 hours at 60 °C. The dried litter was weighed to 3 decimal points. Cover of fine and coarse woody debris and litter depth was estimated at every meter along two 20 m transects for each plot. Woody debris was classified by diameter. Length, max and min diameter was measured for all logs with a diameter greater than 10 cm.&rft.creator=Parkhurst, Tina &rft.date=2008&rft.coverage=northlimit=-29.310351; southlimit=-29.940655; westlimit=116.007385; eastLimit=116.548462&rft.coverage=northlimit=-29.310351; southlimit=-29.940655; westlimit=116.007385; eastLimit=116.548462&rft_rights=Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International Licence http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0&rft_subject=environment&rft_subject=biota&rft_subject=species richness&rft_subject=species cover&rft_subject=ground cover&rft_subject=litterfall&rft_subject=coarse woody debris lenght&rft_subject=RECLAMATION/REVEGETATION/RESTORATION&rft_subject=LAND USE/LAND COVER&rft_subject=COMMUNITY STRUCTURE&rft_subject=LITTER CHARACTERISTICS&rft_subject=AGRICULTURE, LAND AND FARM MANAGEMENT&rft_subject=AGRICULTURAL AND VETERINARY SCIENCES&rft_subject=Community Ecology&rft_subject=BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES&rft_subject=ECOLOGY&rft_subject=Terrestrial Ecology&rft_subject=Invasive Species Ecology&rft_subject=ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES&rft_subject=ECOLOGICAL APPLICATIONS&rft_subject=restoration&rft_subject=old field&rft_subject=land use legacies&rft_subject=carbon planting&rft_subject=herbaceous flora&rft_subject=woody vegetation&rft_subject=semi-arid&rft_subject=Eucalyptus loxophleba&rft.type=dataset&rft.language=English Access the data

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International
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Contact Information

tina.parkhurst@murdoch.edu.au

Brief description

We selected nine study sites, each incorporating three vegetation states: (a) fallow cropland, representing the restoration starting point, (b) planted old field (actively restored site), and (c) reference York gum (E. loxophleba) woodland.
Plant species richness and cover
All annual and perennial plant species were recorded in spring 2017 within each plot and identified to genus and species level where possible. Nomenclatures follow the Western Australian Herbarium (2017). A point intercept method previously demonstrated to provide objective and repeatable measures of cover (Godínez-Alvarez, Herrick, Mattocks, Toledo & Van Zee 2009; Prober, Standish & Wiehl 2011) was used to quantify cover of individual plant species, total vegetation cover and substrate types (i.e., bare ground, litter cover, plant cover). Ground cover, individual species, and canopy cover intercepting at every 2 m along four parallel, evenly spaced 50 m transects across each plot were recorded using a vertically placed dowel (8 mm wide, 2 m tall), resulting in 100 intercepting points per plot. For planted old fields, transects were placed parallel to planting rows, with two centred on rows and two centred between rows. This approximately represented the relative abundance of planted rows and non-planted inter-rows. If a species was recorded in the plot but did not intercept the dowel on any transect it was assigned 0.5 points. This method provided a measure of relative abundance (percentage cover) of plant species across the plot.
To calculate species richness and cover across different life history and growth forms, species were classified into the following groups: total, native trees, native shrubs, native non – planted shrubs, native grasses, native perennial forbs, native annual forbs, exotic grasses and exotic annual forbs using the Western Australian Herbarium (2017) classification.
Woody debris and leaf litter surveys
Leaf-litter dry mass was estimated by collecting leaf-litter from five randomly placed 25 cm x 25 cm quadrats along two 50 m transects across each plot. Litter was stored in paper bags for transportation and then oven dried for 36 hours at 60 °C. The dried litter was weighed to 3 decimal points. Cover of fine and coarse woody debris and litter depth was estimated at every meter along two 20 m transects for each plot. Woody debris was classified by diameter. Length, max and min diameter was measured for all logs with a diameter greater than 10 cm.

Notes

Purpose
Vegetation recovery in old fields towards mature reference states is often limited by abiotic and biotic thresholds resulting from agricultural land use legacies, as commonly highlighted using state and transition models. Old field restoration may include interventions (e.g. planting of vegetation) to overcome these thresholds and assist transition between states. However, our understanding of the effectiveness of these interventions is limited. Using a point-intercept transect method, we surveyed nine sites, each comprising a triplet of fallow cropland, planted old field and woodland reference plots to reflect states of old field restoration, from the degraded state to the reference state. We compared ground cover attributes, and richness and cover of woody and herbaceous flora species.

Data time period: 2017-09-01 to 2017-09-30

This dataset is part of a larger collection

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116.54846,-29.31035 116.54846,-29.94066 116.00739,-29.94066 116.00739,-29.31035 116.54846,-29.31035

116.2779235,-29.625503