Dataset

Population genetics of giant clam species from the Great Barrier Reef and western Pacific

Australian Institute of Marine Science
Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS)
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ctx_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info%3Aofi%2Ffmt%3Akev%3Amtx%3Adc&rfr_id=info%3Asid%2FANDS&rft_id=http://data.aims.gov.au/metadataviewer/faces/view.xhtml?uuid=5862b010-4ade-11dc-8f56-00008a07204e&rft.title=Population genetics of giant clam species from the Great Barrier Reef and western Pacific&rft.identifier=http://data.aims.gov.au/metadataviewer/faces/view.xhtml?uuid=5862b010-4ade-11dc-8f56-00008a07204e&rft.publisher=Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS)&rft.description=A study of the population genetics of giant clams of the genus Tridacna from the Great Barrier Reef and the West Pacific. Variations in gene frequencies of allozymes and common proteins were used to estimate connectivity and dispersal between populations, and to determine the phylogeny of the genus (discrete species identities). Species studied were Hippopus hippopus, Hippopus porcellanus, Tridacna crocea, Tridacna derasa, Tridacna gigas, Tridacna maxima, Tridacna squamosa and Tridacna tevora. Not all loci were examined for all species. \n \nAllele frequencies at 6 polymorphic loci of 860 individual clams sampled from 19 populations of Tridacna maxima throughout the Pacific between November 1989 and October 1991 were examined. Collection locations were: Myrmidon, Davies, Michaelmas, Thetford, 13125, 21200, 20396 and Stapleton Reefs on the Great Barrier Reef; Marovo and Nggela in the Solomon Islands; Mili in the Marshall Islands; Bantayan and Tawi-tawi in the Philippines; Te puka in Tuvalu; Abiang and Abemana in Kiribati; Makogai and Makodragi in Fiji; and Aitutaki in the Cook Islands. Loci were: LDH-1, MDH-2, PGM-2, DIA, LGG-1, GSR. \n \nSeven polymorphic loci (GPI, MDH-1, PGM, DIAPH, AK, LGG-1, LGG-2) from 159 individuals of T. gigas were sampled from 7 populations thoughout the West Pacific (Marovo, Russell, Isabel and Nggela in the Solomon Islands; Silliman in the Philippines; Abemana in Kiribati; and Mili in the Marshall Islands) and compared to data previously obtained in 1990 from 393 individuals from 6 populations (Myrmidon, Grub, Michaelmas, Thetford, 13125 and Stapleton Reefs) from the Great Barrier Reef. \n \n28-40 individuals from 14 populations of Tridacna derasa were sampled from sites on the Great Barrier Reef (2 sites from each of Myrmidon, Bowl, 13125, 21200, 20396; and one site from Michaelmas and Escape Reefs), and from one site each in the Philippines (Scarborough Shoals) and Fiji (Makogai). Gene frequencies at 9 polymorphic loci (GPI, LDH-1, MDH-1, MDH-2, PGM, DIAPH, LGG-1, ENOL, GSR)were examined. \n \nGene frequencies at 26 loci for 8 species of giant clam were examined. Samples were obtained between November 1989 and October 1991. Source and number of individuals sampled was: Hippopus porcellanus (Philippines, 3); Hippopus hippopus (3 -Great Barrier Reef); Tridacna squamosa (8 - GBR, Fiji, Solomon Islands); Tridacna crocea (6 - GBR, Solomon Islands); Tridacna maxima (9 - GBR, Solomon Islands, Cook Islands); Tridacna gigas (9 - GBR, Solomon Islands, Kiribati); Tridacna derasa (9 - GBR, Fiji, Palau); Tridacna tevora (1- Fiji). Polymorphic loci examined were: AAT-1, AK-1, AK-2, DIA-1, ENO-1, EST-1, GPI-1, GSR-1, IDH-1, LDH-1, LDH-2, LGG-1, LGG-2, LP-1, LP-2, LP-3, MDH-1, MDH-2, ME-1, MPI-1, NDH-1, NDH-2, PGK-1, PGM-1, PGM-2.\n To estimate connectivity and dispersal between Tridacna populations, and to determine the discrete species identities.\n&rft.creator=Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS) &rft.date=2021&rft.relation=http://data.aims.gov.au/extpubs/do/viewPub.do?articleId=1341&rft.relation=http://data.aims.gov.au/extpubs/do/viewPub.do?articleId=2866&rft.relation=http://data.aims.gov.au/extpubs/do/viewPub.do?articleId=2647&rft.relation=http://data.aims.gov.au/extpubs/do/viewPub.do?articleId=2480&rft.relation=http://data.aims.gov.au/extpubs/do/viewPub.do?articleId=3368&rft.relation=http://data.aims.gov.au/extpubs/do/viewPub.do?articleId=2481&rft.relation=http://data.aims.gov.au/extpubs/do/viewPub.do?articleId=2479&rft.relation=http://data.aims.gov.au/extpubs/do/viewPub.do?articleId=2603&rft.relation=http://data.aims.gov.au/extpubs/do/viewPub.do?articleId=3365&rft.relation=http://data.aims.gov.au/extpubs/do/viewPub.do?articleId=2604&rft.relation=http://data.aims.gov.au/extpubs/do/viewPub.do?articleId=2590&rft.coverage=northlimit=-18.89; southlimit=-18.89; westlimit=159.78; eastLimit=159.78&rft.coverage=northlimit=-18.89; southlimit=-18.89; westlimit=159.78; eastLimit=159.78&rft.coverage=northlimit=6.08777; southlimit=6.08777; westlimit=171.73194; eastLimit=171.73194&rft.coverage=northlimit=6.08777; southlimit=6.08777; westlimit=171.73194; eastLimit=171.73194&rft.coverage=northlimit=-8.53744; southlimit=-8.53744; westlimit=179.09583; eastLimit=179.09583&rft.coverage=northlimit=-8.53744; southlimit=-8.53744; westlimit=179.09583; eastLimit=179.09583&rft.coverage=northlimit=2.0; southlimit=0.1; westlimit=172.95; eastLimit=173.63&rft.coverage=northlimit=2.0; southlimit=0.1; westlimit=172.95; eastLimit=173.63&rft.coverage=northlimit=-17.4; southlimit=-17.8; westlimit=178.75; eastLimit=178.95&rft.coverage=northlimit=-17.4; southlimit=-17.8; westlimit=178.75; eastLimit=178.95&rft.coverage=northlimit=-6.55; southlimit=-9.1; westlimit=157.9; eastLimit=160.25&rft.coverage=northlimit=-6.55; southlimit=-9.1; westlimit=157.9; eastLimit=160.25&rft.coverage=northlimit=15.15; southlimit=5.2; westlimit=117.7; eastLimit=123.85&rft.coverage=northlimit=15.15; southlimit=5.2; westlimit=117.7; eastLimit=123.85&rft.coverage=northlimit=-13.8; southlimit=-21.1; westlimit=144.3; eastLimit=152.3&rft.coverage=northlimit=-13.8; southlimit=-21.1; westlimit=144.3; eastLimit=152.3&rft.coverage=northlimit=7.62645; southlimit=6.9925; westlimit=134.0; eastLimit=134.6&rft.coverage=northlimit=7.62645; southlimit=6.9925; westlimit=134.0; eastLimit=134.6&rft_rights=Use Limitation: All AIMS data, products and services are provided as is and AIMS does not warrant their fitness for a particular purpose or non-infringement. While AIMS has made every reasonable effort to ensure high quality of the data, products and services, to the extent permitted by law the data, products and services are provided without any warranties of any kind, either expressed or implied, including without limitation any implied warranties of title, merchantability, and fitness for a particular purpose or non-infringement. AIMS make no representation or warranty that the data, products and services are accurate, complete, reliable or current. To the extent permitted by law, AIMS exclude all liability to any person arising directly or indirectly from the use of the data, products and services.&rft_rights=Attribution: Format for citation of metadata sourced from Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS) in a list of reference is as follows: Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS). (2009). Population genetics of giant clam species from the Great Barrier Reef and western Pacific, https://apps.aims.gov.au/metadata/view/5862b010-4ade-11dc-8f56-00008a07204e, accessed[date-of-access].&rft_rights=Resource Usage: \n Use of the AIMS data is for not-for-profit applications only. All other users shall seek permission for use by contacting AIMS. Acknowledgements as prescribed must be clearly set out in the user's formal communications or publications.\n&rft_subject=oceans&rft.type=dataset&rft.language=English Access the data

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Use Limitation: All AIMS data, products and services are provided "as is" and AIMS does not warrant their fitness for a particular purpose or non-infringement. While AIMS has made every reasonable effort to ensure high quality of the data, products and services, to the extent permitted by law the data, products and services are provided without any warranties of any kind, either expressed or implied, including without limitation any implied warranties of title, merchantability, and fitness for a particular purpose or non-infringement. AIMS make no representation or warranty that the data, products and services are accurate, complete, reliable or current. To the extent permitted by law, AIMS exclude all liability to any person arising directly or indirectly from the use of the data, products and services.

Attribution: Format for citation of metadata sourced from Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS) in a list of reference is as follows: "Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS). (2009). Population genetics of giant clam species from the Great Barrier Reef and western Pacific, https://apps.aims.gov.au/metadata/view/5862b010-4ade-11dc-8f56-00008a07204e, accessed[date-of-access]".

Resource Usage: \n Use of the AIMS data is for not-for-profit applications only. All other users shall seek permission for use by contacting AIMS. Acknowledgements as prescribed must be clearly set out in the user's formal communications or publications.\n

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Brief description

A study of the population genetics of giant clams of the genus Tridacna from the Great Barrier Reef and the West Pacific. Variations in gene frequencies of allozymes and common proteins were used to estimate connectivity and dispersal between populations, and to determine the phylogeny of the genus (discrete species identities). Species studied were Hippopus hippopus, Hippopus porcellanus, Tridacna crocea, Tridacna derasa, Tridacna gigas, Tridacna maxima, Tridacna squamosa and Tridacna tevora. Not all loci were examined for all species. \n \nAllele frequencies at 6 polymorphic loci of 860 individual clams sampled from 19 populations of Tridacna maxima throughout the Pacific between November 1989 and October 1991 were examined. Collection locations were: Myrmidon, Davies, Michaelmas, Thetford, 13125, 21200, 20396 and Stapleton Reefs on the Great Barrier Reef; Marovo and Nggela in the Solomon Islands; Mili in the Marshall Islands; Bantayan and Tawi-tawi in the Philippines; Te puka in Tuvalu; Abiang and Abemana in Kiribati; Makogai and Makodragi in Fiji; and Aitutaki in the Cook Islands. Loci were: LDH-1, MDH-2, PGM-2, DIA, LGG-1, GSR. \n \nSeven polymorphic loci (GPI, MDH-1, PGM, DIAPH, AK, LGG-1, LGG-2) from 159 individuals of T. gigas were sampled from 7 populations thoughout the West Pacific (Marovo, Russell, Isabel and Nggela in the Solomon Islands; Silliman in the Philippines; Abemana in Kiribati; and Mili in the Marshall Islands) and compared to data previously obtained in 1990 from 393 individuals from 6 populations (Myrmidon, Grub, Michaelmas, Thetford, 13125 and Stapleton Reefs) from the Great Barrier Reef. \n \n28-40 individuals from 14 populations of Tridacna derasa were sampled from sites on the Great Barrier Reef (2 sites from each of Myrmidon, Bowl, 13125, 21200, 20396; and one site from Michaelmas and Escape Reefs), and from one site each in the Philippines (Scarborough Shoals) and Fiji (Makogai). Gene frequencies at 9 polymorphic loci (GPI, LDH-1, MDH-1, MDH-2, PGM, DIAPH, LGG-1, ENOL, GSR)were examined. \n \nGene frequencies at 26 loci for 8 species of giant clam were examined. Samples were obtained between November 1989 and October 1991. Source and number of individuals sampled was: Hippopus porcellanus (Philippines, 3); Hippopus hippopus (3 -Great Barrier Reef); Tridacna squamosa (8 - GBR, Fiji, Solomon Islands); Tridacna crocea (6 - GBR, Solomon Islands); Tridacna maxima (9 - GBR, Solomon Islands, Cook Islands); Tridacna gigas (9 - GBR, Solomon Islands, Kiribati); Tridacna derasa (9 - GBR, Fiji, Palau); Tridacna tevora (1- Fiji). Polymorphic loci examined were: AAT-1, AK-1, AK-2, DIA-1, ENO-1, EST-1, GPI-1, GSR-1, IDH-1, LDH-1, LDH-2, LGG-1, LGG-2, LP-1, LP-2, LP-3, MDH-1, MDH-2, ME-1, MPI-1, NDH-1, NDH-2, PGK-1, PGM-1, PGM-2.\n To estimate connectivity and dispersal between Tridacna populations, and to determine the discrete species identities.\n

Modified: 12 05 2021

Click to explore relationships graph

159.78,-18.89

159.78,-18.89

171.73194,6.08777

171.73194,6.08777

179.09583,-8.53744

179.09583,-8.53744

173.63,2 173.63,0.1 172.95,0.1 172.95,2 173.63,2

173.29,1.05

178.95,-17.4 178.95,-17.8 178.75,-17.8 178.75,-17.4 178.95,-17.4

178.85,-17.6

160.25,-6.55 160.25,-9.1 157.9,-9.1 157.9,-6.55 160.25,-6.55

159.075,-7.825

123.85,15.15 123.85,5.2 117.7,5.2 117.7,15.15 123.85,15.15

120.775,10.175

152.3,-13.8 152.3,-21.1 144.3,-21.1 144.3,-13.8 152.3,-13.8

148.3,-17.45

134.6,7.62645 134.6,6.9925 134,6.9925 134,7.62645 134.6,7.62645

134.3,7.309475

text: northlimit=-18.89; southlimit=-18.89; westlimit=159.78; eastLimit=159.78

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text: northlimit=-8.53744; southlimit=-8.53744; westlimit=179.09583; eastLimit=179.09583

text: northlimit=2.0; southlimit=0.1; westlimit=172.95; eastLimit=173.63

text: northlimit=-17.4; southlimit=-17.8; westlimit=178.75; eastLimit=178.95

text: northlimit=-6.55; southlimit=-9.1; westlimit=157.9; eastLimit=160.25

text: northlimit=15.15; southlimit=5.2; westlimit=117.7; eastLimit=123.85

text: northlimit=-13.8; southlimit=-21.1; westlimit=144.3; eastLimit=152.3

text: northlimit=7.62645; southlimit=6.9925; westlimit=134.0; eastLimit=134.6

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Identifiers
  • Local : 5862b010-4ade-11dc-8f56-00008a07204e
  • global : 5862b010-4ade-11dc-8f56-00008a07204e