Data

Leaf trait associations with environmental variation in the wide-ranging shrub Dodonaea viscosa subsp. angustissima (Sapindaceae) Part 1: Latitude

Terrestrial Ecosystem Research Network
Baruch, Zdravko ; Christmas , Matthew ; Breed, Martin ; Guerin, Greg ; Caddy-Retalic, Stefan ; McDonald, John ; Jardine, Duncan ; Leitch, Emrys ; Gellie , Nicholas ; Hill, Kathryn ; McCallum , Kimberly ; Lowe, Andy
Viewed: [[ro.stat.viewed]] Cited: [[ro.stat.cited]] Accessed: [[ro.stat.accessed]]
ctx_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info%3Aofi%2Ffmt%3Akev%3Amtx%3Adc&rfr_id=info%3Asid%2FANDS&rft_id=info:doi10.4227/05/57C2343E4E9C2&rft.title=Leaf trait associations with environmental variation in the wide-ranging shrub Dodonaea viscosa subsp. angustissima (Sapindaceae) Part 1: Latitude&rft.identifier=10.4227/05/57C2343E4E9C2&rft.publisher=Terrestrial Ecosystem Research Network&rft.description=Leaf traits for 101 populations of Dodonaea viscosa subsp. angustissima (Sapindaceae) opportunistically collected across a ~1,000 km latitudinal north-south sequence with climates grading from the arid zone to the mesic Mediterranean zone. Additionally, we present leaf traits for 266 individuals on an attitudinal gradient in the Mt Lofty Ranges, South Australia. Traits measured include leaf area and specific leaf area, as well as climatic variables associated with the collection sites. Leaf area is known to be responsive to climatic conditions. This data could be combined with additional collections for Dodonaea viscosa or broader plant trait data sets to explore pant responses to environmental change.Opportunistic sampling: We measured LA and SLA on either recently collected (fresh) or dried, preserved leaves. Samples came from one to five individuals per population and we analyzed five undamaged leaves per individual. We followed standard procedures for field sampling and preservation of fresh leaves (Pérez-Harguindeguy et al. 2013). We scanned the leaves and measured their area with ImageJ (Rasband 2011), before oven drying at 65°C for 48 hours, then weighing and calculating SLA. To account for the area contraction of preserved leaves, which made direct comparison with fresh samples impossible, we calculated a shrinkage factor by measuring fresh and dry LAs from two populations: one from a mesic site (Mt. Bryan 33.33° S; 139.05°E) and the other from an arid site (Andamooka 30.47° S; 137.15° E). Leaves from the northern and more arid site shrunk less (15.6 ± 2.4 %; n=20) than those from the wetter southern site (23.4± 4.3 %; n=25) (F(1,42) = 50.2; P&rft.creator=Baruch, Zdravko &rft.creator=Christmas , Matthew &rft.creator=Breed, Martin &rft.creator=Guerin, Greg &rft.creator=Caddy-Retalic, Stefan &rft.creator=McDonald, John &rft.creator=Jardine, Duncan &rft.creator=Leitch, Emrys &rft.creator=Gellie , Nicholas &rft.creator=Hill, Kathryn &rft.creator=McCallum , Kimberly &rft.creator=Lowe, Andy &rft.date=2016&rft.edition=1&rft.relation=https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/aec.12474&rft.coverage=IBRA: Broken Hill Complex Eyre Yorke Block Flinders Lofty Block Kanmantoo&rft.coverage=northlimit=-23.639; southlimit=-35.97747; westlimit=132.93575; eastLimit=141.72833; projection=EPSG:3577&rft_rights=Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International Licence http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0&rft_rights=TERN services are provided on an as-is and as available basis. Users use any TERN services at their discretion and risk. They will be solely responsible for any damage or loss whatsoever that results from such use including use of any data obtained through TERN and any analysis performed using the TERN infrastructure. <br />Web links to and from external, third party websites should not be construed as implying any relationships with and/or endorsement of the external site or its content by TERN. <br /><br />Please advise any work or publications that use this data via the online form at https://www.tern.org.au/research-publications/#reporting&rft_rights=Please cite this dataset as {Author} ({PublicationYear}). {Title}. {Version, as appropriate}. Terrestrial Ecosystem Research Network. Dataset. {Identifier}.&rft_rights=(C)2016 University of Adelaide. Rights owned by University of Adelaide.&rft_subject=biota&rft_subject=PLANT CHARACTERISTICS&rft_subject=EARTH SCIENCE&rft_subject=BIOSPHERE&rft_subject=VEGETATION&rft_subject=VEGETATION COVER&rft_subject=POPULATION DYNAMICS&rft_subject=ECOLOGICAL DYNAMICS&rft_subject=SPECIES/POPULATION INTERACTIONS&rft_subject=TERRESTRIAL ECOSYSTEMS&rft_subject=ECOSYSTEM FUNCTIONS&rft_subject=Population Ecology&rft_subject=BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES&rft_subject=ECOLOGY&rft_subject=PLANT BIOLOGY&rft_subject=Ecological impacts of climate change and ecological adaptation&rft_subject=mean leaf area (Square Centimetre)&rft_subject=Square Centimetre&rft_subject=leaf area per leaf dry mass trait (Square Metre per Kilogram)&rft_subject=Square Metre per Kilogram&rft_subject=latitude (Degree)&rft_subject=Degree&rft_subject=longitude (Degree)&rft_subject=soil nitrogen content (Milligram Per Kilogram)&rft_subject=Milligram Per Kilogram&rft_subject=soil phosphorus (Kilogram per Hectare)&rft_subject=Kilogram per Hectare&rft_subject=volume fraction of clay in soil (Percent)&rft_subject=Percent&rft_subject=soil bulk density (Cubic Metre per Kilogram)&rft_subject=Cubic Metre per Kilogram&rft_subject=solar radiation mean (Megajoule Per Square Metre)&rft_subject=Megajoule Per Square Metre&rft_subject=air temperature (Degree Celsius)&rft_subject=Degree Celsius&rft_subject=500 km - < 1000 km or approximately 5 degrees - < 10 degrees&rft_subject=irregular&rft_subject=Dodonaea viscosa subsp. angustifolia (L.f.) J.G.West&rft_subject=Climate And Climate Change (9603)&rft_subject=Ecological Modelling&rft_subject=Flora, Fauna and Biodiversity at Regional or Larger Scales (960805)&rft_subject=Remnant Vegetation And Protected Conservation Areas (9613)&rft.type=dataset&rft.language=English Access the data

Licence & Rights:

Open Licence view details
CC-BY

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International Licence
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0

TERN services are provided on an "as-is" and "as available" basis. Users use any TERN services at their discretion and risk. They will be solely responsible for any damage or loss whatsoever that results from such use including use of any data obtained through TERN and any analysis performed using the TERN infrastructure.
Web links to and from external, third party websites should not be construed as implying any relationships with and/or endorsement of the external site or its content by TERN.

Please advise any work or publications that use this data via the online form at https://www.tern.org.au/research-publications/#reporting

Please cite this dataset as {Author} ({PublicationYear}). {Title}. {Version, as appropriate}. Terrestrial Ecosystem Research Network. Dataset. {Identifier}.

(C)2016 University of Adelaide. Rights owned by University of Adelaide.

Access:

Open view details

unclassified

Contact Information

Street Address:
Terrestrial Ecosystem Research Network
Building 1019, 80 Meiers Rd
QLD 4068
Australia
Ph: +61 7 3365 9097

esupport@tern.org.au

Brief description

Leaf traits for 101 populations of Dodonaea viscosa subsp. angustissima (Sapindaceae) opportunistically collected across a ~1,000 km latitudinal north-south sequence with climates grading from the arid zone to the mesic Mediterranean zone. Additionally, we present leaf traits for 266 individuals on an attitudinal gradient in the Mt Lofty Ranges, South Australia. Traits measured include leaf area and specific leaf area, as well as climatic variables associated with the collection sites.

Leaf area is known to be responsive to climatic conditions. This data could be combined with additional collections for Dodonaea viscosa or broader plant trait data sets to explore pant responses to environmental change.

Lineage

Opportunistic sampling: We measured LA and SLA on either recently collected (fresh) or dried, preserved leaves. Samples came from one to five individuals per population and we analyzed five undamaged leaves per individual. We followed standard procedures for field sampling and preservation of fresh leaves (Pérez-Harguindeguy et al. 2013). We scanned the leaves and measured their area with ImageJ (Rasband 2011), before oven drying at 65°C for 48 hours, then weighing and calculating SLA. To account for the area contraction of preserved leaves, which made direct comparison with fresh samples impossible, we calculated a shrinkage factor by measuring fresh and dry LAs from two populations: one from a mesic site (Mt. Bryan 33.33° S; 139.05°E) and the other from an arid site (Andamooka 30.47° S; 137.15° E). Leaves from the northern and more arid site shrunk less (15.6 ± 2.4 %; n=20) than those from the wetter southern site (23.4± 4.3 %; n=25) (F(1,42) = 50.2; P<0.001). The mean shrinkage (20.1 ± 5.3 %) is consistent with published values (Torrez et al.2013; Queenborough & Porras 2014). Consequently, all LAs were converted to a fresh basis by: Fresh LA = Dry LA / 0.201 before SLA was calculated and further analysis Climatic and edaphic variables (Aridity index, Temp. Mean, Temp. Range, Soil N (nitrogen) content.,Soil P (phosphorus) content,%Clay, Bulk density and Solar Radiation) were extracted from the 1km gridded data available in the Atlas of Living Australia. PCA Axis 1 and PCA Axis 2 are derived from a Principal Component Analysis with the climate and edaphic variables used as predictors for Leaf Area and Specific Leaf Area.

Notes

Credit
We at TERN acknowledge the Traditional Owners and Custodians throughout Australia, New Zealand and all nations. We honour their profound connections to land, water, biodiversity and culture and pay our respects to their Elders past, present and emerging.
Purpose
The assessment of leaf area (LA) and specific leaf area (SLA) provides mechanistic insights on the persistence and function of plant species, including their likely success under climate change and their suitability for revegetation. We measured LA and SLA in the perennial shrub Dodonaea viscosa (L.) Jacq. subsp. angustissima (narrow-leaf hop-bush) (Sapindaceae) and correlate the variability in those traits to potential environmental drivers. We measured leaves from 104 populations in a ~1,000 km latitudinal north-south sequence with climates grading from the arid zone to the mesic Mediterranean zone. Regression, bootstrapping and principal component analysis related leaf traits to environment.

Created: 2013-08-01

Issued: 2016-08-28

Modified: 2014-07-14

Data time period: 2013-08-01 to 2015-07-15

This dataset is part of a larger collection

141.72833,-23.639 141.72833,-35.97747 132.93575,-35.97747 132.93575,-23.639 141.72833,-23.639

137.33204,-29.808235