Data

L025 Busselton seismic reflection survey, WA, 1956

Geoscience Australia
Lodwick, K.B.
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ctx_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info%3Aofi%2Ffmt%3Akev%3Amtx%3Adc&rfr_id=info%3Asid%2FANDS&rft_id=http://pid.geoscience.gov.au/dataset/ga/76384&rft.title=L025 Busselton seismic reflection survey, WA, 1956&rft.identifier=http://pid.geoscience.gov.au/dataset/ga/76384&rft.publisher=Geoscience Australia&rft.description=Following a gravity survey of the Perth Basin in 1951-52 (Thyer and Everingham, 1956), in which it was indicated that a sedimentary thickness of about 35,000 ft was probably present in the Perth Basin, several seismic traverses were surveyed across the Basin. This Record deals with one such reflection traverse which was surveyed between Quindalup and Donnybrook. The purposes of the survey were to find the thickness and dip of the sediments and to discover any faulting or folding within them. Results of the survey were inconclusive regarding the depth to basement but indications are that it is at least 8000 ft in the deepest part of the B,sin along this traverse. The sediments appear to be folded and faulted. There is evidence for the existence of a major fault east of the Dunsborough Fault, and the existence of the Whicher Fault was tentatively confirmed.In January and February 1956 a seismic party from the Bureau of Mineral Resources did a reflection survey along a roughly easterly line through Busselton, Western Australia. The line is across the Perth Basin towards its southern limit. A regional gravity survey of the whole of the Basin in 1951-52 (Thyer and Everingham, 1956) disclosed a large negative Bouguer anomaly (Plate 2) in the Basin. The area covered by the Bouguer anomaly is roughly that which includes the Mesozoic to Quaternary formations west of the Darling Fault. Thyer and Everingham concluded that much of the Bouguer anomaly was due to a great thickness of sediments, in places probably as great as 35,000 ft. In the Busselton area metamorphic, gneissic, and granitic rocks are known to crop out along the coastline between Cape Naturaliste and Cape Leeuwin as well as to the east of the Darling Fault. The negative Bouguer anomaly was confined between these two blocks of basement rocks. The seismic line was planned to cross the Bouguer anomaly from basement outcrop to basement outcrop.&rft.creator=Lodwick, K.B. &rft.date=1962&rft.coverage=northlimit=-33.5; southlimit=-33.75; westlimit=115.0; eastLimit=116.0&rft.coverage=northlimit=-33.5; southlimit=-33.75; westlimit=115.0; eastLimit=116.0&rft_rights=Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International Licence http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0&rft_subject=geoscientificInformation&rft_subject=Seismology and Seismic Exploration&rft_subject=EARTH SCIENCES&rft_subject=GEOPHYSICS&rft_subject=HVC 144637&rft_subject=Seismic Data seismic survey&rft_subject=seismic reflection&rft_subject=petroleum exploration&rft_subject=geophysics&rft_subject=seismic velocity&rft_subject=AU-WA&rft_subject=Published_External&rft.type=dataset&rft.language=English Access the data

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Brief description

Following a gravity survey of the Perth Basin in 1951-52 (Thyer and Everingham, 1956), in which it was indicated that a sedimentary thickness of about 35,000 ft was probably present in the Perth Basin, several seismic traverses were surveyed across the Basin. This Record deals with one such reflection traverse which was surveyed between Quindalup and Donnybrook. The purposes of the survey were to find the
thickness and dip of the sediments and to discover any faulting or folding within them.
Results of the survey were inconclusive regarding the depth to basement but indications are that it is at least 8000 ft in the deepest part of the B,sin along this traverse. The sediments appear to be folded and faulted. There is evidence for the existence of a major fault east of the Dunsborough Fault, and the existence of the Whicher Fault was tentatively confirmed.

Lineage

In January and February 1956 a seismic party from the Bureau of Mineral Resources did a reflection survey along a roughly easterly line through Busselton, Western Australia. The line is across the Perth Basin towards its southern limit. A regional gravity survey of the whole of the Basin in 1951-52 (Thyer and Everingham, 1956) disclosed a large negative Bouguer anomaly (Plate 2) in the Basin. The area covered by the Bouguer anomaly is roughly that which
includes the Mesozoic to Quaternary formations west of the Darling Fault. Thyer and Everingham concluded that much of the Bouguer anomaly was due to a great thickness of sediments, in places probably as great as 35,000 ft. In the Busselton area metamorphic, gneissic, and granitic rocks are known to crop out along the coastline between Cape
Naturaliste and Cape Leeuwin as well as to the east of the Darling Fault. The negative Bouguer anomaly was confined between these two blocks of basement rocks. The seismic line was planned to cross the Bouguer anomaly from basement outcrop to basement outcrop.

Issued: 1962

Data time period: 1956-01-01 to 1956-02-28

Click to explore relationships graph

116,-33.5 116,-33.75 115,-33.75 115,-33.5 116,-33.5

115.5,-33.625

text: northlimit=-33.5; southlimit=-33.75; westlimit=115.0; eastLimit=116.0

Identifiers