Data

Higher Levels of Multiple Paternities Increase Seedling Survival in the Long-Lived Tree Eucalyptus gracilis

Terrestrial Ecosystem Research Network
Breed, Martin
Viewed: [[ro.stat.viewed]] Cited: [[ro.stat.cited]] Accessed: [[ro.stat.accessed]]
ctx_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info%3Aofi%2Ffmt%3Akev%3Amtx%3Adc&rfr_id=info%3Asid%2FANDS&rft_id=http://geonetwork.tern.org.au/geonetwork/srv/eng/catalog.search#/metadata/dcace60b-0d07-4268-9baa-be652370503d&rft.title=Higher Levels of Multiple Paternities Increase Seedling Survival in the Long-Lived Tree Eucalyptus gracilis&rft.identifier=http://geonetwork.tern.org.au/geonetwork/srv/eng/catalog.search#/metadata/dcace60b-0d07-4268-9baa-be652370503d&rft.publisher=Terrestrial Ecosystem Research Network&rft.description= The dataset aims at studying associations between mating system parameters and fitness in natural populations of trees. Fifty-eight open-pollinated progeny arrays were collected from trees in three populations. Progeny were planted in a reciprocal transplant trial. Fitness was measured by family establishment rates. We genotyped all trees and their progeny at eight microsatellite loci. Planting site had a strong effect on fitness, but seed provenance and seed provenance × planting site did not. Populations had comparable mating system parameters and were generally outcrossed, experienced low biparental inbreeding and high levels of multiple paternity. As predicted, seed families that had more multiple paternities also had higher fitness, and no fitness-inbreeding correlations were detected. Demonstrating that fitness was most affected by multiple paternities rather than inbreeding, we provide evidence supporting the constrained inbreeding hypothesis; i.e. that multiple paternity may impact on fitness over and above that of inbreeding, particularly for preferentially outcrossing trees at life stages beyond seed development. This dataset could potentially be reused for meta-analysis or review of effects of habitat fragmentation on plants (e.g. pollination, mating system, genetic diversity etc). Please contact owner prior to re-use. this is part of the authors' PhD at the University of Adelaide, supervised by Prof Andrew Lowe, Dr Mike Gardner and Dr Kym Ottewell. Main goals of PhD 1. Examine and quantify the impact of fragmentation and tree density on mating patterns, and how this may vary with pollinators of differing mobility 2. Determine the theoretical expectations and perform empirical tests of mating pattern-fitness relationships in trees 3. Explore the plant genetic resource management implications that arise from the observations in aims 1 and 2 Reciprocal transplant experiment and microsatellite genotyping of open-pollinated progeny arrays : Fifty-eight open-pollinated progeny arrays were collected from trees in three populations. Progeny were planted in a reciprocal transplant trial. Fitness was measured by family establishment rates. We genotyped all trees and their progeny at eight microsatellite loci.&rft.creator=Breed, Martin &rft.date=2015&rft.edition=1&rft.relation=https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0090478&rft.coverage=IBRA region: Murray-Darling Basin ; Murray-Darling Depression&rft.coverage=northlimit=-33.37384; southlimit=-35.11739; westlimit=139.14136; eastLimit=141.26172; projection=EPSG:3577&rft_rights=Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International Licence http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0&rft_rights=TERN services are provided on an as-is and as available basis. Users use any TERN services at their discretion and risk. They will be solely responsible for any damage or loss whatsoever that results from such use including use of any data obtained through TERN and any analysis performed using the TERN infrastructure. <br />Web links to and from external, third party websites should not be construed as implying any relationships with and/or endorsement of the external site or its content by TERN. <br /><br />Please advise any work or publications that use this data via the online form at https://www.tern.org.au/research-publications/#reporting&rft_rights=Please cite this dataset as {Author} ({PublicationYear}). {Title}. {Version, as appropriate}. Terrestrial Ecosystem Research Network. Dataset. {Identifier}.&rft_rights=(C)2015 University of Adelaide. Rights owned by University of Adelaide.&rft_subject=biota&rft_subject=ECOSYSTEM FUNCTIONS&rft_subject=EARTH SCIENCE&rft_subject=BIOSPHERE&rft_subject=ECOLOGICAL DYNAMICS&rft_subject=PLANT BREEDING AND GENETICS&rft_subject=AGRICULTURE&rft_subject=AGRICULTURAL PLANT SCIENCE&rft_subject=EVOLUTIONARY ADAPTATION&rft_subject=SPECIES/POPULATION INTERACTIONS&rft_subject=Evolutionary ecology&rft_subject=GENETICS&rft_subject=BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES&rft_subject=Population Ecology&rft_subject=ECOLOGY&rft_subject=Forestry Management and Environment&rft_subject=AGRICULTURAL AND VETERINARY SCIENCES&rft_subject=FORESTRY SCIENCES&rft_subject=Molecular Evolution&rft_subject=heterozygosity (Unitless)&rft_subject=Unitless&rft_subject=vegetative height (Centimetre)&rft_subject=Centimetre&rft_subject=dead plant (Percent)&rft_subject=Percent&rft_subject=100 meters - < 250 meters&rft_subject=irregular&rft_subject=Eucalyptus gracilis F.Muell.&rft_subject=Ecosystem Assessment And Management (9605)&rft_subject=Flora, Fauna And Biodiversity (9608)&rft_subject=Land And Water Management (9609)&rft.type=dataset&rft.language=English Access the data

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International Licence
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TERN services are provided on an "as-is" and "as available" basis. Users use any TERN services at their discretion and risk. They will be solely responsible for any damage or loss whatsoever that results from such use including use of any data obtained through TERN and any analysis performed using the TERN infrastructure.
Web links to and from external, third party websites should not be construed as implying any relationships with and/or endorsement of the external site or its content by TERN.

Please advise any work or publications that use this data via the online form at https://www.tern.org.au/research-publications/#reporting

Please cite this dataset as {Author} ({PublicationYear}). {Title}. {Version, as appropriate}. Terrestrial Ecosystem Research Network. Dataset. {Identifier}.

(C)2015 University of Adelaide. Rights owned by University of Adelaide.

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Brief description

The dataset aims at studying associations between mating system parameters and fitness in natural populations of trees. Fifty-eight open-pollinated progeny arrays were collected from trees in three populations. Progeny were planted in a reciprocal transplant trial. Fitness was measured by family establishment rates. We genotyped all trees and their progeny at eight microsatellite loci. Planting site had a strong effect on fitness, but seed provenance and seed provenance × planting site did not. Populations had comparable mating system parameters and were generally outcrossed, experienced low biparental inbreeding and high levels of multiple paternity. As predicted, seed families that had more multiple paternities also had higher fitness, and no fitness-inbreeding correlations were detected. Demonstrating that fitness was most affected by multiple paternities rather than inbreeding, we provide evidence supporting the constrained inbreeding hypothesis; i.e. that multiple paternity may impact on fitness over and above that of inbreeding, particularly for preferentially outcrossing trees at life stages beyond seed development. This dataset could potentially be reused for meta-analysis or review of effects of habitat fragmentation on plants (e.g. pollination, mating system, genetic diversity etc). Please contact owner prior to re-use.

this is part of the authors' PhD at the University of Adelaide, supervised by Prof Andrew Lowe, Dr Mike Gardner and Dr Kym Ottewell. Main goals of PhD 1. Examine and quantify the impact of fragmentation and tree density on mating patterns, and how this may vary with pollinators of differing mobility 2. Determine the theoretical expectations and perform empirical tests of mating pattern-fitness relationships in trees 3. Explore the plant genetic resource management implications that arise from the observations in aims 1 and 2

Lineage

Reciprocal transplant experiment and microsatellite genotyping of open-pollinated progeny arrays : Fifty-eight open-pollinated progeny arrays were collected from trees in three populations. Progeny were planted in a reciprocal transplant trial. Fitness was measured by family establishment rates. We genotyped all trees and their progeny at eight microsatellite loci.

Notes

Credit
We at TERN acknowledge the Traditional Owners and Custodians throughout Australia, New Zealand and all nations. We honour their profound connections to land, water, biodiversity and culture and pay our respects to their Elders past, present and emerging.
Purpose
Studying associations between mating system parameters and fitness in natural populations of trees advances our understanding of how local environments affect seed quality, and thereby helps to predict when inbreeding or multiple paternities should impact on fitness. Indeed, for species that demonstrate inbreeding avoidance, multiple paternities (i.e. the number of male parents per half-sib family) should still vary and regulate fitness more than inbreeding named here as the constrained inbreeding hypothesis. We test this hypothesis in Eucalyptus gracilis, a predominantly insect-pollinated tree.

Created: 2009-09-17

Issued: 2015-01-29

Modified: 2014-07-14

Data time period: 2009-09-17 to 2015-01-01

This dataset is part of a larger collection

141.26172,-33.37384 141.26172,-35.11739 139.14136,-35.11739 139.14136,-33.37384 141.26172,-33.37384

140.20154,-34.245615