Data

Dataset for soil nutrients in old field restoration

Terrestrial Ecosystem Research Network
Parkhurst, Tina
Viewed: [[ro.stat.viewed]] Cited: [[ro.stat.cited]] Accessed: [[ro.stat.accessed]]
ctx_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info%3Aofi%2Ffmt%3Akev%3Amtx%3Adc&rfr_id=info%3Asid%2FANDS&rft_id=info:doi10.25901/azn7-r497&rft.title=Dataset for soil nutrients in old field restoration&rft.identifier=10.25901/azn7-r497&rft.publisher=Terrestrial Ecosystem Research Network&rft.description=We investigated recovery of soil chemical properties after restoration in semi-arid Western Australia, hypothesising that elevated nutrient concentrations would gradually decline post planting, but available phosphorus (P) concentrations would remain higher than reference conditions. We used a space-for-time substitution approach, comparing 10 planted old field plots with matched fallow cropland and reference woodlands. Sampling on planted old fields and reference woodland plots was stratified into open patches and under tree canopy to account for consistent differences between these areas. Soil samples to 10 cm depth were collected at 20 points across 30 plots. Ten samples were randomly collected and combined from locations beneath trees and a further 10 samples collected in gaps and combined, resulting in one soil sample for beneath tree canopy and another one for gap areas. Sampling occurred in autumn 2017 to capture potentially high concentrations of soil nitrate following the seasonal die-back of exotic annual plants typical of this Mediterranean-climate region. Samples were stored at 4 °C in plastic zip-lock bags until delivery to the CSBP Limited (Bibra Lake, WA) laboratories. Chemical parameters measured were plant available P (Colwell), plant available N (nitrate and ammonium), total N, plant available potassium (Colwell) and plant available sulphur (KCl 40). Lastly, electrical conductivity, pH (H2O, CaCl2), and soil texture were quantified as differences among plots could affect nutrient availability and soil chemistry. Soil available nutrients were also measured using Plant Root Simulator (PRS)TM resin probes (Western Ag Innovations, 2010, https://www.westernag.ca/inn). Probes contain anion or cation exchange membranes within a plastic stake. The membranes act as a sink for collecting nutrients and continuously absorb ions during deployment. Four anion and cation probes were placed vertically in the top 15 cm of soil at each stratification. Probes were left in the ground for three months during the growing season, from August to November 2017. This period was deemed suitable for semi-arid regions to achieve sufficient nutrient uptake but not too long to saturate probes. After removal, probes were cleaned with deionized water and sent to Western Ag Innovations (Canada) for analysis. All soil chemical analyses were conducted under laboratory conditions using standard test procedures. PRS probe nutrients are reported as micrograms/10cm2/time.&rft.creator=Parkhurst, Tina &rft.date=2021&rft.edition=1.0.0&rft.coverage=Northern Wheatbelt, Western Australia, near the towns of Perenjori and Coorow&rft.coverage=northlimit=-29.38412; southlimit=-30.03061; westlimit=115.96344; eastLimit=116.707764; projection=WGS84 (EPSG:4326)&rft_rights=Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International Licence http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0&rft_rights=TERN services are provided on an as-is and as available basis. Users use any TERN services at their discretion and risk. They will be solely responsible for any damage or loss whatsoever that results from such use including use of any data obtained through TERN and any analysis performed using the TERN infrastructure. <br/>Web links to and from external, third party websites should not be construed as implying any relationships with and/or endorsement of the external site or its content by TERN. <br /><br />Please advise any work or publications that use this data via the online form at https://www.tern.org.au/research-publications/#reporting&rft_rights=Please cite this dataset as {Author} ({PublicationYear}). {Title}. {Version, as appropriate}. Terrestrial Ecosystem Research Network. Dataset. {Identifier}.&rft_subject=farming&rft_subject=environment&rft_subject=soil pH&rft_subject=nitrogen content&rft_subject=Milligram Per Kilogram&rft_subject=soil texture&rft_subject=Percent&rft_subject=soil electrical conductivity&rft_subject=decisiemens per metre&rft_subject=ammonium in soil&rft_subject=soil phosphorus&rft_subject=soil nitrate&rft_subject=soil potassium&rft_subject=soil sulfur&rft_subject=soil magnesium&rft_subject=soil iron&rft_subject=soil copper&rft_subject=soil manganese&rft_subject=soil zink&rft_subject=soil boron&rft_subject=soil lead&rft_subject=soil aluminium&rft_subject=soil cadmium&rft_subject=AGRICULTURE&rft_subject=EARTH SCIENCE&rft_subject=RECLAMATION/REVEGETATION/RESTORATION&rft_subject=NUTRIENT CYCLING&rft_subject=BIOSPHERE&rft_subject=ECOLOGICAL DYNAMICS&rft_subject=ECOSYSTEM FUNCTIONS&rft_subject=PHOSPHORUS&rft_subject=NITROGEN&rft_subject=Weekly - < Monthly&rft_subject=Terrestrial Ecology&rft_subject=BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES&rft_subject=ECOLOGY&rft_subject=Agricultural Land Management&rft_subject=AGRICULTURAL AND VETERINARY SCIENCES&rft_subject=AGRICULTURE, LAND AND FARM MANAGEMENT&rft_subject=Restoration ecology&rft_subject=old field&rft.type=dataset&rft.language=English Access the data

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TERN services are provided on an "as-is" and "as available" basis. Users use any TERN services at their discretion and risk. They will be solely responsible for any damage or loss whatsoever that results from such use including use of any data obtained through TERN and any analysis performed using the TERN infrastructure.
Web links to and from external, third party websites should not be construed as implying any relationships with and/or endorsement of the external site or its content by TERN.

Please advise any work or publications that use this data via the online form at https://www.tern.org.au/research-publications/#reporting

Please cite this dataset as {Author} ({PublicationYear}). {Title}.
{Version, as appropriate}. Terrestrial Ecosystem Research Network. Dataset. {Identifier}.

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Brief description

We investigated recovery of soil chemical properties after restoration in semi-arid Western Australia, hypothesising that elevated nutrient concentrations would gradually decline post planting, but available phosphorus (P) concentrations would remain higher than reference conditions. We used a space-for-time substitution approach, comparing 10 planted old field plots with matched fallow cropland and reference woodlands. Sampling on planted old fields and reference woodland plots was stratified into open patches and under tree canopy to account for consistent differences between these areas.
Soil samples to 10 cm depth were collected at 20 points across 30 plots. Ten samples were randomly collected and combined from locations beneath trees and a further 10 samples collected in gaps and combined, resulting in one soil sample for beneath tree canopy and another one for gap areas. Sampling occurred in autumn 2017 to capture potentially high concentrations of soil nitrate following the seasonal die-back of exotic annual plants typical of this Mediterranean-climate region. Samples were stored at 4 °C in plastic zip-lock bags until delivery to the CSBP Limited (Bibra Lake, WA) laboratories. Chemical parameters measured were plant available P (Colwell), plant available N (nitrate and ammonium), total N, plant available potassium (Colwell) and plant available sulphur (KCl 40). Lastly, electrical conductivity, pH (H2O, CaCl2), and soil texture were quantified as differences among plots could affect nutrient availability and soil chemistry.
Soil available nutrients were also measured using Plant Root Simulator (PRS)TM resin probes (Western Ag Innovations, 2010, https://www.westernag.ca/inn). Probes contain anion or cation exchange membranes within a plastic stake. The membranes act as a sink for collecting nutrients and continuously absorb ions during deployment. Four anion and cation probes were placed vertically in the top 15 cm of soil at each stratification. Probes were left in the ground for three months during the growing season, from August to November 2017. This period was deemed suitable for semi-arid regions to achieve sufficient nutrient uptake but not too long to saturate probes. After removal, probes were cleaned with deionized water and sent to Western Ag Innovations (Canada) for analysis. All soil chemical analyses were conducted under laboratory conditions using standard test procedures. PRS probe nutrients are reported as micrograms/10cm2/time.

Notes

Purpose
Understanding constraints to ecological restoration on former agricultural land has become increasingly important due to agricultural land degradation in the developed world, and growing evidence for enduring agricultural legacies that limit native species recovery. In particular, the removal of native plant biomass and subsequent disturbance of soil properties through farming activities can alter soil ecosystem processes. Planting of native plant species is a common approach to restoring native vegetation on agricultural land, and is assumed to benefit soil ecosystem processes, but the degree to which altered soil chemical processes recover is poorly documented.

Created: 2021-09-30

Issued: 2021-10-11

Modified: 2021-09-30

Data time period: 2017-06-01 to 2017-11-30

This dataset is part of a larger collection

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116.70776,-29.38412 116.70776,-30.03061 115.96344,-30.03061 115.96344,-29.38412 116.70776,-29.38412

116.335602,-29.707365