Data

Data for Fungal Effects on Thermal Tolerance and Energy Levels of Acyrtociphon pisum and Hippodamia convergens.

Terrestrial Ecosystem Research Network
Porras, Mitzy ; Agudelo-Cantero, Gustavo A. ; Santiago, Geovanni ; Navas, Carlos ; Loeschcke, Volker ; Sørensen, Jesper G. ; Rajotte, Edwin G.
Viewed: [[ro.stat.viewed]] Cited: [[ro.stat.cited]] Accessed: [[ro.stat.accessed]]
ctx_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info%3Aofi%2Ffmt%3Akev%3Amtx%3Adc&rfr_id=info%3Asid%2FANDS&rft_id=info:doi10.25901/wsb4-aa33&rft.title=Data for Fungal Effects on Thermal Tolerance and Energy Levels of Acyrtociphon pisum and Hippodamia convergens.&rft.identifier=10.25901/wsb4-aa33&rft.publisher=Terrestrial Ecosystem Research Network&rft.description=This dataset includes upper and lower thermal limits, voluntary exposure to extreme cold and warm temperatures, ATP levels, and longevity of Acyrtociphom pisum and Hippodamia convergens. Pathogens can modify many aspects of host behavior or physiology, with cascading impacts across trophic levels in terrestrial food webs. These changes include thermal tolerance of hosts, however, the effects of fungal infections on thermal tolerances and behavioral responses to extreme temperatures of prey (Acyrtociphon pisum) and predator (Hippodamia convergens) insect species have rarely been studied. We measured the impacts of fungal infection (at two levels: low and high spore load) on thermal tolerance (critical thermal maximum and minimum), voluntary exposure, energetic cost, and survival of both insect species. Fungal infection reduced thermal tolerance to heat in both insect species, but only reduced tolerance to cold of the predator. Voluntary exposure to extreme temperatures was modified by the infection, energetic cost increased with infection and thermal conditions, and survival was significantly reduced in both insect species.Progress Code: completedMaintenance and Update Frequency: notPlanned&rft.creator=Porras, Mitzy &rft.creator=Agudelo-Cantero, Gustavo A. &rft.creator=Santiago, Geovanni &rft.creator=Navas, Carlos &rft.creator=Loeschcke, Volker &rft.creator=Sørensen, Jesper G. &rft.creator=Rajotte, Edwin G. &rft.date=2021&rft.edition=1.0&rft.coverage=Open raised bed of the Greenhouse facility at Penn State University, University Park, State College, PA. USA&rft.coverage=northlimit=40.802481; southlimit=40.802481; westlimit=-77.862908; eastLimit=-77.862908; projection=EPSG:4326&rft_rights=Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International Licence http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0&rft_rights=TERN services are provided on an as-is and as available basis. Users use any TERN services at their discretion and risk. They will be solely responsible for any damage or loss whatsoever that results from such use including use of any data obtained through TERN and any analysis performed using the TERN infrastructure. <br />Web links to and from external, third party websites should not be construed as implying any relationships with and/or endorsement of the external site or its content by TERN. <br /><br />Please advise any work or publications that use this data via the online form at https://www.tern.org.au/research-publications/#reporting&rft_rights=Please cite this dataset as {Author} ({PublicationYear}). {Title}. {Version, as appropriate}. Terrestrial Ecosystem Research Network. Dataset. {Identifier}.&rft_subject=biota&rft_subject=environment&rft_subject=INSECTS&rft_subject=FUNGI&rft_subject=EARTH SCIENCE&rft_subject=BIOLOGICAL CLASSIFICATION&rft_subject=ANIMAL ECOLOGY AND BEHAVIOR&rft_subject=AGRICULTURE&rft_subject=ANIMAL SCIENCE&rft_subject=Biological Adaptation&rft_subject=BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES&rft_subject=EVOLUTIONARY BIOLOGY&rft_subject=BIOCHEMISTRY AND CELL BIOLOGY&rft_subject=DEMOGRAPHY&rft_subject=STUDIES IN HUMAN SOCIETY&rft_subject=life span (Day)&rft_subject=Day&rft_subject=ATP content (Nanogram per Kilogram)&rft_subject=Nanogram per Kilogram&rft_subject=critical thermal maximum (Degree Celsius per Minute)&rft_subject=Degree Celsius per Minute&rft_subject=critical thermal minimum (Degree Celsius per Minute)&rft_subject=individual count (Number)&rft_subject=Number&rft_subject=Point Resolution&rft_subject=Daily - < Weekly&rft_subject=Thermal tolerance&rft_subject=Extreme temperatures&rft_subject=Behavioral thermoregulation&rft_subject=Insecta&rft_subject=Fungi&rft.type=dataset&rft.language=English Access the data

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International Licence
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0

TERN services are provided on an "as-is" and "as available" basis. Users use any TERN services at their discretion and risk. They will be solely responsible for any damage or loss whatsoever that results from such use including use of any data obtained through TERN and any analysis performed using the TERN infrastructure.
Web links to and from external, third party websites should not be construed as implying any relationships with and/or endorsement of the external site or its content by TERN.

Please advise any work or publications that use this data via the online form at https://www.tern.org.au/research-publications/#reporting

Please cite this dataset as {Author} ({PublicationYear}). {Title}. {Version, as appropriate}. Terrestrial Ecosystem Research Network. Dataset. {Identifier}.

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unclassified

Contact Information

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QLD 4068
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Brief description

This dataset includes upper and lower thermal limits, voluntary exposure to extreme cold and warm temperatures, ATP levels, and longevity of Acyrtociphom pisum and Hippodamia convergens. Pathogens can modify many aspects of host behavior or physiology, with cascading impacts across trophic levels in terrestrial food webs. These changes include thermal tolerance of hosts, however, the effects of fungal infections on thermal tolerances and behavioral responses to extreme temperatures of prey (Acyrtociphon pisum) and predator (Hippodamia convergens) insect species have rarely been studied. We measured the impacts of fungal infection (at two levels: low and high spore load) on thermal tolerance (critical thermal maximum and minimum), voluntary exposure, energetic cost, and survival of both insect species. Fungal infection reduced thermal tolerance to heat in both insect species, but only reduced tolerance to cold of the predator. Voluntary exposure to extreme temperatures was modified by the infection, energetic cost increased with infection and thermal conditions, and survival was significantly reduced in both insect species.

Lineage

Progress Code: completed
Maintenance and Update Frequency: notPlanned

Notes

Credit
We at TERN acknowledge the Traditional Owners and Custodians throughout Australia, New Zealand and all nations. We honour their profound connections to land, water, biodiversity and culture and pay our respects to their Elders past, present and emerging.
Purpose
We examined the impacts of fungal infection (at two levels: low and high spore load) on thermal tolerance (critical thermal maximum and minimum), voluntary exposure, energetic cost, and survival of both insect species.
Data Quality Information

Data Quality Assessment Scope
local : dataset
The variable response were compared among insects exposed to sprayed plants with water (control), low fungal load (1.4 x 10 exp^6 spore ha exp^-1), and high fungal load (1.4 x 10 exp^12 spore ha exp^-1). The experimental individuals were consistently exposed to a given experimental condition, each measurement was rigorously performed following the same protocol which guarantee consistency and accuracy.

Data Quality Assessment Result
local : Quality Result
Critical thermal limits, voluntary exposure to extreme temperatures, ATP levels under each condition, and survival were accurately measured using the same experimental methods for each experimental unit.

Created: 2021-09-20

Issued: 2021-10-22

Modified: 2024-06-20

Data time period: 2020-07-18 to 2021-09-18

This dataset is part of a larger collection

Click to explore relationships graph

-77.86291,40.80248

-77.862908,40.802481

text: Open raised bed of the Greenhouse facility at Penn State University, University Park, State College, PA. USA

Other Information
Point-of-truth metadata URL

uri : https://geonetwork.tern.org.au/geonetwork/srv/eng/catalog.search#/metadata/b9c3747a-f2ba-4c50-9349-2ddf0ab4d09a

Fungal Infections Lead to Shifts in Thermal Tolerance and Voluntary Exposure to Extreme Temperatures in Both Prey and Predator Insects

doi : https://doi.org/10.21203/rs.3.rs-718118/v1