Dataset

Assessment of image quality and levels of patient and staff dose during imaging of the common femoral artery during coronary angiography

Queensland University of Technology
Wilson-Stewart, Kelly ; Fontanarosa, Davide ; Trapp, Jamie V ; Li, Dan ; Drovandi, Chris C ; Anderson, Rebecca K ; Malacova, Eva ; Gett, Steven ; Kruger, Alan
Viewed: [[ro.stat.viewed]] Cited: [[ro.stat.cited]] Accessed: [[ro.stat.accessed]]
ctx_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info%3Aofi%2Ffmt%3Akev%3Amtx%3Adc&rfr_id=info%3Asid%2FANDS&rft_id=info:doi10.25912/RDF_1613523876962&rft.title=Assessment of image quality and levels of patient and staff dose during imaging of the common femoral artery during coronary angiography&rft.identifier=10.25912/RDF_1613523876962&rft.publisher=Queensland University of Technology&rft.description=Fluoroscopy is a method used to provide real-time imaging of the body during medical procedures.  It utilises x-rays, which pass through the patient to visualise internal structures.  Historically, x-ray fluoroscopy was primarily used for diagnosis, but recent advances in both imaging and procedural equipment have led to considerable growth in the range of fluoroscopically guided procedures, particularly in the field of interventional cardiology and vascular intervention.  Interventional cardiovascular cases are often less costly than surgery and allow medical intervention to be conducted in a minimally invasive way, reducing the operative riskd to the patient.  Although very useful for imaging, ionising radiation may have several detrimental effects on those exposed, including cellular damage, malignancies, inheritable mutations, and cataracts.  When the x-ray beam enters the patient’s body, a portion of the photons interact with this solid barrier and are scattered. Scattered radiation levels near the patient can be relatively high, even under routine working conditions, and staff are subsequently exposed whilst conducting cardiovascular procedures. Recent research regarding the levels of occupational dose during fluoroscopically guided procedures has focussed on the doctor performing the examination. Nursing staff are underrepresented in the literature examining occupational dose levels during angiography, and fluoroscopy more generally. Given that nurses are often involved in more procedures than the doctors, more studies evaluating the dose levels to other in-room staff is vital to utilise an evidence-based approach to dose minimisation. This dataset was produced as part of Kelly Wilson-Stewart's PhD, 'Factors which influence occupational  radiation head and eye dose to in-room personnel during angiographic procedures'.  Kelly's Ph.D. project aims to quantify the levels of temple dose to staff during diagnostic and interventional cardiac and endovascular procedures utilising fluoroscopy.  An additional focus will be placed on reporting on factors that may influence occupational dose levels to nurses and other in-room staff. The following people were involved in project design and data collection: Davide Fontanarosa: School of Clinical Sciences, Queensland University of Technology, 2 George Street, Brisbane, QLD, 4000, Australia Centre for Biomedical Technologies (CBT), Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, QLD, 4000, Australia Jamie V. Trapp: School of Chemistry and Physics, Queensland University of Technology, 2 George Street, Brisbane, QLD, 4000, Australia Rebecca K. Anderson: Cardiovascular Suites, Greenslopes Private Hospital, Newdegate Street, Greenslopes, Brisbane, QLD, 4120, Australia The following people were involved in statistical analysis: Dan Li: School of Mathematical Sciences, Queensland University of Technology, 2 George Street, Brisbane, QLD, 4000, Australia Centre for Data Science, Queensland University of Technology, 2 George Street, Brisbane, QLD, 4000, Australia ARC Centre of Excellence for Mathematical and Statistical Frontiers, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC, 3010, Australia Chris C. Drovandi: School of Mathematical Sciences, Queensland University of Technology, 2 George Street, Brisbane, QLD, 4000, Australia Centre for Data Science, Queensland University of Technology, 2 George Street, Brisbane, QLD, 4000, Australia ARC Centre of Excellence for Mathematical and Statistical Frontiers, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC, 3010, Australia Eva Malacova: QMIR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, 200 Herston Road, Herston, QLD, 4006, Australia Centre for Biomedical Technologies (CBT), Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, QLD, 4000, Australia The data owner also wishes to acknowledge the contributions of the following people: Steven Gett: Greenslopes Private Hospital, Newdegate Street, Greenslopes, Brisbane, QLD, 4120, Australia Alan Kruger: Greenslopes Private Hospital, Newdegate Street, Greenslopes, Brisbane, QLD, 4120, Australia Royal Brisbane and Women’s Hospital, Butterfield Street, Herston, QLD, 4029 The data owner gratefully acknowledges the support provided by the Australian Commonwealth Government in the form of a research stipend. &rft.creator=Wilson-Stewart, Kelly &rft.creator=Fontanarosa, Davide &rft.creator=Trapp, Jamie V &rft.creator=Li, Dan &rft.creator=Drovandi, Chris C &rft.creator=Anderson, Rebecca K &rft.creator=Malacova, Eva &rft.creator=Gett, Steven &rft.creator=Kruger, Alan &rft.date=2021&rft.edition=1&rft.relation=https://eprints.qut.edu.au/206211/&rft.relation=https://eprints.qut.edu.au/204713/&rft.coverage=153.317870,-26.996845 152.668523,-26.996845 152.668523,-27.767441 153.317870,-27.767441 153.317870,-26.996845&rft_rights=© Kelly Wilson-Stewart, 2021. &rft_rights=Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share Alike 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/&rft_subject=OTHER MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES&rft_subject=MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES&rft_subject=Fluoroscopy&rft_subject=Cardiology&rft_subject=Nursing&rft_subject=Scrub nurse&rft_subject=Angiography&rft_subject=Radiation&rft_subject=Vascular surgery&rft_subject=Occupational dose&rft_subject=X-ray&rft_subject=Eye dose&rft_subject=Other physical sciences&rft_subject=CLINICAL SCIENCES&rft_subject=Radiology and organ imaging&rft.type=dataset&rft.language=English Access the data

Licence & Rights:

Non-Commercial Licence view details
CC-BY-NC-SA

Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share Alike 3.0
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/

© Kelly Wilson-Stewart, 2021.

Access:

Other view details

The owner of this data retains copyright. You must give appropriate credit, provide a link to the license, and indicate if changes were made to the dataset. You may do so in any reasonable manner, but not in any way that suggest the licensor endorses you or your use. You may not use this data for commercial purposes.

Contact Information

Postal Address:
Mrs Kelly Wilson-Stewart

k.wilson-stewart@qut.edu.au

Full description

Fluoroscopy is a method used to provide real-time imaging of the body during medical procedures.  It utilises x-rays, which pass through the patient to visualise internal structures.  Historically, x-ray fluoroscopy was primarily used for diagnosis, but recent advances in both imaging and procedural equipment have led to considerable growth in the range of fluoroscopically guided procedures, particularly in the field of interventional cardiology and vascular intervention.  Interventional cardiovascular cases are often less costly than surgery and allow medical intervention to be conducted in a minimally invasive way, reducing the operative riskd to the patient. 

Although very useful for imaging, ionising radiation may have several detrimental effects on those exposed, including cellular damage, malignancies, inheritable mutations, and cataracts.  When the x-ray beam enters the patient’s body, a portion of the photons interact with this solid barrier and are scattered. Scattered radiation levels near the patient can be relatively high, even under routine working conditions, and staff are subsequently exposed whilst conducting cardiovascular procedures.

Recent research regarding the levels of occupational dose during fluoroscopically guided procedures has focussed on the doctor performing the examination. Nursing staff are underrepresented in the literature examining occupational dose levels during angiography, and fluoroscopy more generally. Given that nurses are often involved in more procedures than the doctors, more studies evaluating the dose levels to other in-room staff is vital to utilise an evidence-based approach to dose minimisation.

This dataset was produced as part of Kelly Wilson-Stewart's PhD, 'Factors which influence occupational  radiation head and eye dose to in-room personnel during angiographic procedures'. 

Kelly's Ph.D. project aims to quantify the levels of temple dose to staff during diagnostic and interventional cardiac and endovascular procedures utilising fluoroscopy.  An additional focus will be placed on reporting on factors that may influence occupational dose levels to nurses and other in-room staff.

The following people were involved in project design and data collection:

Davide Fontanarosa:

  • School of Clinical Sciences, Queensland University of Technology, 2 George Street, Brisbane, QLD, 4000, Australia
  • Centre for Biomedical Technologies (CBT), Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, QLD, 4000, Australia

Jamie V. Trapp:

  • School of Chemistry and Physics, Queensland University of Technology, 2 George Street, Brisbane, QLD, 4000, Australia

Rebecca K. Anderson:

  • Cardiovascular Suites, Greenslopes Private Hospital, Newdegate Street, Greenslopes, Brisbane, QLD, 4120, Australia

The following people were involved in statistical analysis:

Dan Li:

  • School of Mathematical Sciences, Queensland University of Technology, 2 George Street, Brisbane, QLD, 4000, Australia
  • Centre for Data Science, Queensland University of Technology, 2 George Street, Brisbane, QLD, 4000, Australia
  • ARC Centre of Excellence for Mathematical and Statistical Frontiers, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC, 3010, Australia

Chris C. Drovandi:

  • School of Mathematical Sciences, Queensland University of Technology, 2 George Street, Brisbane, QLD, 4000, Australia
  • Centre for Data Science, Queensland University of Technology, 2 George Street, Brisbane, QLD, 4000, Australia
  • ARC Centre of Excellence for Mathematical and Statistical Frontiers, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC, 3010, Australia

Eva Malacova:

  • QMIR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, 200 Herston Road, Herston, QLD, 4006, Australia
  • Centre for Biomedical Technologies (CBT), Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, QLD, 4000, Australia

The data owner also wishes to acknowledge the contributions of the following people:

Steven Gett:

  • Greenslopes Private Hospital, Newdegate Street, Greenslopes, Brisbane, QLD, 4120, Australia

Alan Kruger:

  • Greenslopes Private Hospital, Newdegate Street, Greenslopes, Brisbane, QLD, 4120, Australia
  • Royal Brisbane and Women’s Hospital, Butterfield Street, Herston, QLD, 4029

The data owner gratefully acknowledges the support provided by the Australian Commonwealth Government in the form of a research stipend.

Data time period: 02 2017 to 31 08 2019

Click to explore relationships graph

153.317870,-26.996845 152.668523,-26.996845 152.668523,-27.767441 153.317870,-27.767441 153.317870,-26.996845

152.9931965,-27.382143

Identifiers