Data

Victorian Tall Eucalypt Forest Plot Network (Victorian Central Highlands Monitoring Project): Tree Fern Growth Study, Victoria, Australia, 2014

Long Term Ecological Research Network
Lindenmayer, David, Prof ; Blair, David, Mr
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ctx_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info%3Aofi%2Ffmt%3Akev%3Amtx%3Adc&rfr_id=info%3Asid%2FANDS&rft_id=http://www.ltern.org.au/knb/metacat/ltern4.42/html&rft.title=Victorian Tall Eucalypt Forest Plot Network (Victorian Central Highlands Monitoring Project): Tree Fern Growth Study, Victoria, Australia, 2014&rft.identifier=ltern4.42&rft.publisher=Long Term Ecological Research Network&rft.description=We measured 5 years of growth of 335 Cyathea australis and Dicksonia antarctica after a large wildfire in 2009 in south-eastern Australia. The ferns were in 4 separate geographic locations (Wallaby Creek, Marysville, Toolangi and O’Shannassy) and sites within each area had different environmental variables, which were measured (slope, aspect, elevation). Tree ferns had overall height measured using a tape measure and the new post-fire growth measured using calipers. The tree ferns were measured to determine average growth rates of the two species and which of the environmental variables were important for fern growth. We found growth rates of these two species were largely unaffected by static environmental variables or geographic location. However, growth rates were significantly related to initial height at the time of the fire; a finding consistent in both species and all geographic locations. These data underpinned the conclusions and analysis in the paper Non-linear growth in tree ferns, Dicksonia antarctica and Cyathea australis by David P. Blair, Wade Blanchard, Sam C. Banks, David B. Lindenmayer published in PLOS ONE (https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0176908).&rft.creator=Lindenmayer, David &rft.creator=Blair, David &rft.date=2016&rft.edition=34&rft.coverage=Victorian Central Highlands, Wallaby Creek, Toolangi, Marysville, O’Shannassy water catchment&rft.coverage=northlimit=-37.875; southlimit=-37.875; westlimit=145.5; eastLimit=146.125; projection=WGS84&rft_rights=Creative Commons - Attribution 4.0 International&rft_rights=This work is licensed under Creative Commons - Attribution 4.0 International. The licence allows others copy, distribute, display, and perform the work and derivative works based upon it provided that they credit the original source and any other nominated parties. Special conditions: Prior to publication of research utilising this data, the data provider (David Blair) requests consultation. Spatial data has been mediated to protect potentially threatened species. Access may be granted through contact with David Blair. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/&rft_subject=Earth science. Biosphere. Vegetation. Plant characteristics.&rft_subject=Vegetation structure&rft_subject=Individual plants&rft_subject=Fire&rft_subject=ECOLOGY&rft_subject=BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES&rft_subject=PLANT BIOLOGY&rft_subject=Tree ferns, Dicksonia antarctica, Cyathea australis, growth rates&rft.type=dataset&rft.language=English Access the data

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This work is licensed under Creative Commons - Attribution 4.0 International. The licence allows others copy, distribute, display, and perform the work and derivative works based upon it provided that they credit the original source and any other nominated parties.
Special conditions:
Prior to publication of research utilising this data, the data provider (David Blair) requests consultation.
Spatial data has been mediated to protect potentially threatened species. Access may be granted through contact with David Blair.
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

Creative Commons - Attribution 4.0 International

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Brief description

We measured 5 years of growth of 335 Cyathea australis and Dicksonia antarctica after a large wildfire in 2009 in south-eastern Australia. The ferns were in 4 separate geographic locations (Wallaby Creek, Marysville, Toolangi and O’Shannassy) and sites within each area had different environmental variables, which were measured (slope, aspect, elevation). Tree ferns had overall height measured using a tape measure and the new post-fire growth measured using calipers.

The tree ferns were measured to determine average growth rates of the two species and which of the environmental variables were important for fern growth. We found growth rates of these two species were largely unaffected by static environmental variables or geographic location. However, growth rates were significantly related to initial height at the time of the fire; a finding consistent in both species and all geographic locations.

These data underpinned the conclusions and analysis in the paper "Non-linear growth in tree ferns, Dicksonia antarctica and Cyathea australis" by David P. Blair, Wade Blanchard, Sam C. Banks, David B. Lindenmayer published in PLOS ONE (https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0176908).

Data time period: 2014 to 2014

This dataset is part of a larger collection

Click to explore relationships graph

145.5,-37.875 146.125,-37.875

145.8125,-37.875

text: Victorian Central Highlands, Wallaby Creek, Toolangi, Marysville, O’Shannassy water catchment

Identifiers
  • Local : ltern4.42