Data

Tumbarumba Wet Eucalypt Ant Abundance Data

Terrestrial Ecosystem Research Network
van Gorsel, Eva ; Andersen, Alan ; Kitchen, Mark
Viewed: [[ro.stat.viewed]] Cited: [[ro.stat.cited]] Accessed: [[ro.stat.accessed]]
ctx_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info%3Aofi%2Ffmt%3Akev%3Amtx%3Adc&rfr_id=info%3Asid%2FANDS&rft_id=http://geonetwork.tern.org.au/geonetwork/srv/eng/catalog.search#/metadata/8e7372cf-cc6d-4b5b-bcb3-463b4ed42c4a&rft.title=Tumbarumba Wet Eucalypt Ant Abundance Data&rft.identifier=http://geonetwork.tern.org.au/geonetwork/srv/eng/catalog.search#/metadata/8e7372cf-cc6d-4b5b-bcb3-463b4ed42c4a&rft.publisher=Terrestrial Ecosystem Research Network&rft.description=This data contains ant abundance and incidence collected in the Tumbarumba Wet Eucalypt site.Ant sampling was conducted using the TERN Australian SuperSite Network Ant Monitoring Protocol (2014)Data CreationAnt sampling: in 2015, twenty pitfall traps were placed in a standard grid (4 x 5) with 10 m spacing within the core 1 ha vegetation plot in permanent positions marked with PVC tubes (or inverted traps). If the position on the grid was occupied by a tree or rock then the trap was placed adjacent to it. Trapping was conducted over 3 days with traps sealed with screw cap at the end of the period. Any dirt, plant material or other debris was removed as contaminating material can stain the ants if left with them for extended periods. Tubes were stored in the dark as light will cause colours to fade and the cuticle or integument will deteriorate over time, greatly reducing the usefulness of the material for taxonomic studies and making identifications difficult or impossible. Traps were buried with lips completely flush with the soil surface. Sealed pitfall traps were sent to a central processing laboratory where contents are transferred to ethanol for long term storage. Non-ant by-catch was stored for future reference. Ant abundance and incidence was pooled at the site level.Ant species identification: Ant specimens were identified and curated at the CSIRO's Tropical Ecosystems Research Centre in Darwin by Dr Alan Andersen.&rft.creator=van Gorsel, Eva &rft.creator=Andersen, Alan &rft.creator=Kitchen, Mark &rft.date=2022&rft.edition=1.0&rft.coverage=The Tumbarumba Wet Eucalypt site is located in the Bago State Forest, near Batlow New South Wales. The vegetation within the site is classified as open wet sclerophyll Eucalypt forest.&rft.coverage=northlimit=-35.49; southlimit=-35.49; westlimit=148.23; eastLimit=148.23; projection=EPSG:4326&rft_rights=Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International Licence http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0&rft_rights=TERN services are provided on an as-is and as available basis. Users use any TERN services at their discretion and risk. They will be solely responsible for any damage or loss whatsoever that results from such use including use of any data obtained through TERN and any analysis performed using the TERN infrastructure. <br />Web links to and from external, third party websites should not be construed as implying any relationships with and/or endorsement of the external site or its content by TERN. <br /><br />Please advise any work or publications that use this data via the online form at https://www.tern.org.au/research-publications/#reporting&rft_rights=Please cite this dataset as {Author} ({PublicationYear}). {Title}. {Version, as appropriate}. Terrestrial Ecosystem Research Network. Dataset. {Identifier}.&rft_subject=biota&rft_subject=environment&rft_subject=ANIMALS/INVERTEBRATES&rft_subject=EARTH SCIENCE&rft_subject=BIOLOGICAL CLASSIFICATION&rft_subject=ECOLOGICAL DYNAMICS&rft_subject=BIOSPHERE&rft_subject=ECOSYSTEM FUNCTIONS&rft_subject=ARTHROPODS&rft_subject=INSECTS&rft_subject=ECOLOGICAL APPLICATIONS&rft_subject=ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES&rft_subject=ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE AND MANAGEMENT&rft_subject=ECOLOGY&rft_subject=BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES&rft_subject=Tumbarumba Wet Eucalypt&rft_subject=Tumbarumba Wet Eucalypt, core1ha&rft_subject=Wet Pitfall Trap&rft_subject=number of individual animals (Number)&rft_subject=Number&rft_subject=animal occurrence (Number)&rft_subject=scientific name (Unitless)&rft_subject=Unitless&rft_subject=field species name (Unitless)&rft_subject=incidence of animals (Number)&rft_subject=Point Resolution&rft_subject=Annual&rft_subject=INSECTA&rft_subject=ARTHROPODA&rft_subject=FORMICIDAE&rft_subject=Invertebrate&rft_subject=Ants&rft_subject=Core ha&rft.type=dataset&rft.language=English Access the data

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International Licence
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TERN services are provided on an "as-is" and "as available" basis. Users use any TERN services at their discretion and risk. They will be solely responsible for any damage or loss whatsoever that results from such use including use of any data obtained through TERN and any analysis performed using the TERN infrastructure.
Web links to and from external, third party websites should not be construed as implying any relationships with and/or endorsement of the external site or its content by TERN.

Please advise any work or publications that use this data via the online form at https://www.tern.org.au/research-publications/#reporting

Please cite this dataset as {Author} ({PublicationYear}). {Title}. {Version, as appropriate}. Terrestrial Ecosystem Research Network. Dataset. {Identifier}.

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Brief description

This data contains ant abundance and incidence collected in the Tumbarumba Wet Eucalypt site.

Lineage

Ant sampling was conducted using the TERN Australian SuperSite Network Ant Monitoring Protocol (2014)

Data Creation
Ant sampling: in 2015, twenty pitfall traps were placed in a standard grid (4 x 5) with 10 m spacing within the core 1 ha vegetation plot in permanent positions marked with PVC tubes (or inverted traps). If the position on the grid was occupied by a tree or rock then the trap was placed adjacent to it. Trapping was conducted over 3 days with traps sealed with screw cap at the end of the period. Any dirt, plant material or other debris was removed as contaminating material can stain the ants if left with them for extended periods. Tubes were stored in the dark as light will cause colours to fade and the cuticle or integument will deteriorate over time, greatly reducing the usefulness of the material for taxonomic studies and making identifications difficult or impossible. Traps were buried with lips completely flush with the soil surface. Sealed pitfall traps were sent to a central processing laboratory where contents are transferred to ethanol for long term storage. Non-ant by-catch was stored for future reference. Ant abundance and incidence was pooled at the site level.
Ant species identification: Ant specimens were identified and curated at the CSIRO's Tropical Ecosystems Research Centre in Darwin by Dr Alan Andersen.

Notes

Credit
This work was funded by the Terrestrial Ecosystem Research Network (TERN), an Australian Government National Collaborative Research Infrastructure Strategy (NCRIS) project.
We at TERN acknowledge the Traditional Owners and Custodians throughout Australia, New Zealand and all nations. We honour their profound connections to land, water, biodiversity and culture and pay our respects to their Elders past, present and emerging.
Purpose
Ants are Australia’s dominant faunal group in terms of biomass and energy flow. They occupy all trophic levels, act as ecosystem engineers, feature in many mutualistic interactions with plants, and are a key food resource for many vertebrates. Ants are also Australia’s best studied insect group in terms of biogeography and community dynamics. They are the most widely used invertebrate bio-indicators in environmental assessment and monitoring.

Created: 2022-05-05

Modified: 2014-07-14

Issued: 2022-05-16

Data time period: 2015-01-01

Click to explore relationships graph

148.23,-35.49

148.23,-35.49

text: The Tumbarumba Wet Eucalypt site is located in the Bago State Forest, near Batlow New South Wales. The vegetation within the site is classified as open wet sclerophyll Eucalypt forest.