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Role of gratitude in the professional experience of pre-service teachers

University of Tasmania, Australia
Howells, Kerry (Has point of contact , Aggregated by)
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ctx_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info%3Aofi%2Ffmt%3Akev%3Amtx%3Adc&rfr_id=info%3Asid%2FANDS&rft_id=http://vivo.utas.edu.au/vivo/individual/n2879&rft.title=Role of gratitude in the professional experience of pre-service teachers&rft.identifier=http://vivo.utas.edu.au/vivo/individual/n2879&rft.publisher=University of Tasmania, Australia&rft.description=Study comprised six self-selected participants. Each participant was enrolled full-time in the graduate-entry Bachelor of Teaching degree. Each participant was in their second semester of the degree. The participants differed in gender, age, and teaching specialisation: (Gender: the sample included one female and five male participants; Age: the participants’ ages ranged from 25 to 35; Teaching specialisation: four of the students were specialising in high-school teaching (English/SOSE [Studies of Society and Environment], science and LOTE [languages other than English]) and two were specialising in primary-school teaching. Participants taught in both low socioeconomic-status and middle-socioeconomic-status schools. They were exposed to numerous pedagogical practices and learning environments, and the challenges they faced differed significantly. Participants were surveyed during their four-week Professional experience (their second practicum: PE2). Structured interviews and a focus group (60–90 minutes in duration) were used to generate data. Focus was on the following three questions: How do pre-service teachers apply gratitude in the context of their professional experience? What are the effects of this? What challenges do pre-service teachers face when practising gratitude in a teaching context? Participants were also given journals in which to record their ideas, opinions and thoughts on gratitude while on PE2. These were notebooks which also had inserted into the front cover information to focus and guide the participants as they practised gratitude while on professional experience. The definition of gratitude that guides the present study was included, as well as the following guiding questions: What did you do to practise gratitude today? What were the effects of this practice? What challenges, if any, did you experience when practising gratitude today? However, writing in the gratitude journal was voluntary and was not used as a data-collection method for this project owing to the fact that ethics clearance was not able to be gained in sufficient time. Although the gratitude journals were not an official data-collection method, they allowed participants to reflect and gain insight into their own thoughts and opinions on gratitude while on practicum. Participants were also encouraged to refer to their journals throughout their interview and the focus group as a way of triggering and refreshing their memory. Standardised open-ended interviews (Quinn Patton, 2002) were the first official data-collection technique undertaken in the present study and involved five participants. One of the participants was unable to commit to the interview because of unforeseen personal circumstances, but he did take part in the focus group – the second data-collection method, conducted with all six participants. Data were analysed using open coding and cluster analysis (Miles & Huberman, 1994). A matrix was then utilised in the selective coding process as a means of recognising relationships within the data and to identify themes (Miles & Huberman, 1994)&rft.creator=Howells, Kerry&rft.date=2015&rft_subject=Gratitude&rft_subject=Education&rft_subject=Specialist Studies in Education not elsewhere classified&rft_subject=EDUCATION&rft_subject=SPECIALIST STUDIES IN EDUCATION&rft.type=dataset&rft.language=English Access the data

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Study comprised six self-selected participants. Each participant was enrolled full-time in the graduate-entry Bachelor of Teaching degree. Each participant was in their second semester of the degree. The participants differed in gender, age, and teaching specialisation: (Gender: the sample included one female and five male participants; Age: the participants’ ages ranged from 25 to 35; Teaching specialisation: four of the students were specialising in high-school teaching (English/SOSE [Studies of Society and Environment], science and LOTE [languages other than English]) and two were specialising in primary-school teaching. Participants taught in both low socioeconomic-status and middle-socioeconomic-status schools. They were exposed to numerous pedagogical practices and learning environments, and the challenges they faced differed significantly. Participants were surveyed during their four-week Professional experience (their second practicum: PE2). Structured interviews and a focus group (60–90 minutes in duration) were used to generate data. Focus was on the following three questions: How do pre-service teachers apply gratitude in the context of their professional experience? What are the effects of this? What challenges do pre-service teachers face when practising gratitude in a teaching context? Participants were also given journals in which to record their ideas, opinions and thoughts on gratitude while on PE2. These were notebooks which also had inserted into the front cover information to focus and guide the participants as they practised gratitude while on professional experience. The definition of gratitude that guides the present study was included, as well as the following guiding questions: What did you do to practise gratitude today? What were the effects of this practice? What challenges, if any, did you experience when practising gratitude today? However, writing in the gratitude journal was voluntary and was not used as a data-collection method for this project owing to the fact that ethics clearance was not able to be gained in sufficient time. Although the gratitude journals were not an official data-collection method, they allowed participants to reflect and gain insight into their own thoughts and opinions on gratitude while on practicum. Participants were also encouraged to refer to their journals throughout their interview and the focus group as a way of triggering and refreshing their memory. Standardised open-ended interviews (Quinn Patton, 2002) were the first official data-collection technique undertaken in the present study and involved five participants. One of the participants was unable to commit to the interview because of unforeseen personal circumstances, but he did take part in the focus group – the second data-collection method, conducted with all six participants. Data were analysed using open coding and cluster analysis (Miles & Huberman, 1994). A matrix was then utilised in the selective coding process as a means of recognising relationships within the data and to identify themes (Miles & Huberman, 1994)
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