Data

Response of barley, durum and bread wheat varieties to crown rot across two sowing times – Tamworth 2014

Centre for eResearch and Digital Innovation (CeRDI) at Federation University Australia
Department of Primary Industries NSW ; Simpfendorfer, Steven
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ctx_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info%3Aofi%2Ffmt%3Akev%3Amtx%3Adc&rfr_id=info%3Asid%2FANDS&rft_id=https://www.farmtrials.com.au/trial/21432&rft.title=Response of barley, durum and bread wheat varieties to crown rot across two sowing times – Tamworth 2014&rft.identifier=https://www.farmtrials.com.au/trial/21432&rft.publisher=Centre for eResearch and Digital Innovation (CeRDI) at Federation University Australia&rft.description=To examine the impact of crown rot on yield and grain quality in 22 barley, six durum and 34 bread wheat entries across two sowing times at Tamworth in northern NSW in 2014.Crown rot, caused predominantly by the fungus Fusarium pseudograminearum (Fp), is a major constraint to winter cereal (wheat, barley and durum) production in the northern grains region. Yield loss is related to the expression of whiteheads which are induced by moisture and/or temperature stress during flowering and grain-filling. Previous NSW DPI research has demonstrated that earlier sowing can reduce the expression of crown rot by bringing grain-fill forward a week or two when temperatures are generally lower. Earlier sowing potentially also facilitates increased root growth early in the season which may result in deeper root exploration and access to soil moisture throughout the season. However, sowing time needs to be balanced against the risk of excessive early vegetative growth depleting soil moisture reserves prior to grain-fill and the risk of frost versus terminal heat stress during flowering and grain development. The impact of crown rot on yield and grain quality was examined in 22 barley, 6 durum and 34 bread wheat entries across two sowing times at Tamworth in northern NSW in 2014.&rft.creator=Department of Primary Industries NSW &rft.creator=Simpfendorfer, Steven &rft.date=2019&rft.coverage=northlimit=-31.147460; southlimit=-31.147460; westlimit=150.983303; eastlimit=150.983303; projection=WGS84&rft_rights=Online Farm Trials Terms of Use https://www.farmtrials.com.au/terms-of-use/&rft_rights=Copyright. All rights reserved. https://www.farmtrials.com.au/terms-of-use/&rft_subject=CROP AND PASTURE PRODUCTION&rft_subject=AGRICULTURAL AND VETERINARY SCIENCES&rft_subject=Cereal&rft_subject=Barley&rft_subject=Wheat&rft_subject=Variety Type&rft.type=dataset&rft.language=English Access the data

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To examine the impact of crown rot on yield and grain quality in 22 barley, six durum and 34 bread wheat entries across two sowing times at Tamworth in northern NSW in 2014.
Crown rot, caused predominantly by the fungus Fusarium pseudograminearum (Fp), is a major constraint to winter cereal (wheat, barley and durum) production in the northern grains region. Yield loss is related to the expression of whiteheads which are induced by moisture and/or temperature stress during flowering and grain-filling. Previous NSW DPI research has demonstrated that earlier sowing can reduce the expression of crown rot by bringing grain-fill forward a week or two when temperatures are generally lower. Earlier sowing potentially also facilitates increased root growth early in the season which may result in deeper root exploration and access to soil moisture throughout the season. However, sowing time needs to be balanced against the risk of excessive early vegetative growth depleting soil moisture reserves prior to grain-fill and the risk of frost versus terminal heat stress during flowering and grain development. The impact of crown rot on yield and grain quality was examined in 22 barley, 6 durum and 34 bread wheat entries across two sowing times at Tamworth in northern NSW in 2014.

Created: 2014

Issued: 22 09 2019

Data time period: 2014 to 2014

This dataset is part of a larger collection

150.9833,-31.14746

150.983303,-31.14746

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