grant

Re-balancing global resources: Manipulating toxic prussic acid (dhurrin) to improve nitrogen use efficiency in forage sorghum in a changing climate [ 2010-08-27 - 2013-08-27 ]

Research Grant

[Cite as http://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/LP100100434]

Researchers: Dr Timothy Cavagnaro (Chief Investigator) ,  Dr Roslyn Gleadow (Chief Investigator) ,  Prof John Hamill (Chief Investigator) ,  Prof Birger Moeller (Partner Investigator)

Brief description Re-balancing global resources: Manipulating toxic prussic acid (dhurrin) to improve nitrogen use efficiency in forage sorghum in a changing climate. Sorghum is grown widely is Australia and world-wide for forage, grain (mostly for animal feed) and biofuels. It grows well in dry areas. The problem is that the leaves contain a toxin that releases prussic acid (cyanide) that can reduce animal production or even kill stock feeding on it, especially when water stressed. The problem will get worse with climate change. Low-cyanide plants developed by us using non-GM methods grow fast, but accumulate nitrate instead which is also toxic. This is a waste of expensive fertiliser too. We aim to develop plants that divert resources to growth instead of toxins in order to reduce fertiliser use and help prepare for the future. The fast growing plants may also be useful as a biofuel crop.

Funding Amount $270,000

Funding Scheme Linkage Projects

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