Dataset

Quantifying dynamic pressure and temperature conditions on fault asperities during earthquake slip - supporting data

Also known as: Dynamic pressure on fault asperities during lab earthquakes
The Australian National University
Kathryn Hayward (Owned by)
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ctx_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info%3Aofi%2Ffmt%3Akev%3Amtx%3Adc&rfr_id=info%3Asid%2FANDS&rft_id=info:doi10.25911/5f7fbf66a478b&rft.title=Quantifying dynamic pressure and temperature conditions on fault asperities during earthquake slip - supporting data&rft.identifier=10.25911/5f7fbf66a478b&rft.publisher=The Australian National University&rft.description=New insights into the pressure and temperature conditions on fault surfaces during seismic slip are provided by Raman-active vibrational modes of SiO2 glass. Here we provide the data collected relating to experiments performed on triaxial apparatus at room temperature and high normal stresses on pre-ground, high-purity silica glass surfaces. During slip, velocities exceed 0.32 m s-1 over durations of less than one millisecond, generating frictional heat and locally melting the fault surfaces. Temperature increases permit structural rearrangement within the melt; these changes are preserved by rapid quenching. Using Raman spectroscopy, we analyse melt-welded regions and show that these areas exhibit systematic changes in the spectra of silica. Changes result from a decrease in the inter-tetrahedral Si-O-Si bond angle and are correlated to increasing silica glass density in the slip regions. Densification results from both rapid cooling rates and exposure to very high pressures at asperity contacts. We use data from other experiments to calibrate these effects, estimating quench temperatures up to 1800 K and pressures of ~180 MPa. These results provide the first quantitative evidence for the effects of quench rates and high inter-asperity pressures on the physics of melting and quenching during seismic slip and its impact on fault behaviour. First experimental results showing that the structure of SiO2 glass changes at conditions equivalent to fault surfaces during an earthquake. &rft.creator=Kathryn Hayward&rft.date=2020&rft_rights=CC BY&rft_rights= http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/au/deed.en&rft_subject=Structural Chemistry and Spectroscopy&rft_subject=CHEMICAL SCIENCES&rft_subject=PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY (INCL. STRUCTURAL)&rft_subject=Structural Geology&rft_subject=EARTH SCIENCES&rft_subject=GEOLOGY&rft.type=dataset&rft.language=English Access the data

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Contact Information

Postal Address:
Research School of Earth Sciences 142 Mills Road Canberra ACT 2601

kathryn.hayward@anu.edu.au

Full description

New insights into the pressure and temperature conditions on fault surfaces during seismic slip are provided by Raman-active vibrational modes of SiO2 glass. Here we provide the data collected relating to experiments performed on triaxial apparatus at room temperature and high normal stresses on pre-ground, high-purity silica glass surfaces. During slip, velocities exceed 0.32 m s-1 over durations of less than one millisecond, generating frictional heat and locally melting the fault surfaces. Temperature increases permit structural rearrangement within the melt; these changes are preserved by rapid quenching. Using Raman spectroscopy, we analyse melt-welded regions and show that these areas exhibit systematic changes in the spectra of silica. Changes result from a decrease in the inter-tetrahedral Si-O-Si bond angle and are correlated to increasing silica glass density in the slip regions. Densification results from both rapid cooling rates and exposure to very high pressures at asperity contacts. We use data from other experiments to calibrate these effects, estimating quench temperatures up to 1800 K and pressures of ~180 MPa. These results provide the first quantitative evidence for the effects of quench rates and high inter-asperity pressures on the physics of melting and quenching during seismic slip and its impact on fault behaviour.

Notes

9.41 MB.

Significance statement

First experimental results showing that the structure of SiO2 glass changes at conditions equivalent to fault surfaces during an earthquake.

Created: 2018

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