Data

Parkes observations for project P1029 semester 2019OCTS_01

Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation
Hobbs, George ; Johnston, S ; Li, Di
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ctx_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info%3Aofi%2Ffmt%3Akev%3Amtx%3Adc&rfr_id=info%3Asid%2FANDS&rft_id=info:doi10.25919/5e84df439ad95&rft.title=Parkes observations for project P1029 semester 2019OCTS_01&rft.identifier=10.25919/5e84df439ad95&rft.publisher=Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO)&rft.description=Even with modern observing systems, the pulse emission mechanism from pulsars remains enigmatic. Pulse nulling (in which the pulse emission ceases) has been known since 1970 and yet we still do not know the timescale over which it occurs. To date, we see one pulse on and then next pulse off. However, if the emission switching time is random then we must sometimes observe partial pulses. Detecting such a pulse will enable us to determine the timescale at which this phenomena occurs. We therefore propose to observe two pulsars over a sufficiently long duration that will ensure that we observe such a nulling event.&rft.creator=Hobbs, George &rft.creator=Johnston, S &rft.creator=Li, Di &rft.date=2020&rft.edition=v1&rft_rights=All Rights (including copyright) CSIRO 2019.&rft_rights=Creative Commons Attribution https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/&rft_subject=pulsars, neutron stars&rft_subject=Astronomical and Space Sciences not elsewhere classified&rft_subject=PHYSICAL SCIENCES&rft_subject=ASTRONOMICAL AND SPACE SCIENCES&rft.type=dataset&rft.language=English Access the data

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All Rights (including copyright) CSIRO 2019.

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Brief description

Even with modern observing systems, the pulse emission mechanism from pulsars remains enigmatic. Pulse nulling (in which the pulse emission ceases) has been known since 1970 and yet we still do not know the timescale over which it occurs. To date, we see one pulse on and then next pulse off. However, if the emission switching time is random then we must sometimes observe partial pulses. Detecting such a pulse will enable us to determine the timescale at which this phenomena occurs. We therefore propose to observe two pulsars over a sufficiently long duration that will ensure that we observe such a nulling event.

Data time period: 2019-10-01 to 2020-03-31

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