Data

Overconfidence and the conjunction fallacy in sports betting behaviour

Southern Cross University
Bowling, Alison ; Grant, Leigh
Viewed: [[ro.stat.viewed]] Cited: [[ro.stat.cited]] Accessed: [[ro.stat.accessed]]
ctx_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info%3Aofi%2Ffmt%3Akev%3Amtx%3Adc&rfr_id=info%3Asid%2FANDS&rft_id=info:doi10.4226/47/5ad57a1d6dbb1&rft.title=Overconfidence and the conjunction fallacy in sports betting behaviour&rft.identifier=10.4226/47/5ad57a1d6dbb1&rft.publisher=Southern Cross University&rft.description=Respondents were asked whether or not they would bet on the outcomes of eight single pairs of NRL matches. Sports betting behaviour, gambling consumption, overconfidence and other demographics were also obtained.Data Processing: Stata/IC 14.2Data was collected by Dedar Abjula, Leigh Grant and Alison Bowling, by means of a Qualtrix survey.&rft.creator=Bowling, Alison &rft.creator=Grant, Leigh &rft.date=2018&rft_rights=CC BY V4.0&rft_subject=sports betting&rft_subject=heuristics&rft_subject=online gambling&rft.type=dataset&rft.language=English Access the data

Licence & Rights:

Open Licence view details
CC-BY

CC BY V4.0

Access:

Open

Full description

Respondents were asked whether or not they would bet on the outcomes of eight single pairs of NRL matches. Sports betting behaviour, gambling consumption, overconfidence and other demographics were also obtained.

Data Processing: Stata/IC 14.2

Data was collected by Dedar Abjula, Leigh Grant and Alison Bowling, by means of a Qualtrix survey.

Available: 20180416

Issued: 2018

Created:

Click to explore relationships graph
Subjects

User Contributed Tags    

Login to tag this record with meaningful keywords to make it easier to discover

Identifiers