Data

Northern Australian Tropical Transect Ant Abundance Data

Terrestrial Ecosystem Research Network
Andersen, Alan
Viewed: [[ro.stat.viewed]] Cited: [[ro.stat.cited]] Accessed: [[ro.stat.accessed]]
ctx_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info%3Aofi%2Ffmt%3Akev%3Amtx%3Adc&rfr_id=info%3Asid%2FANDS&rft_id=http://geonetwork.tern.org.au/geonetwork/srv/eng/catalog.search#/metadata/72fc29ec-6cda-4454-8157-e83c4dda74a3&rft.title=Northern Australian Tropical Transect Ant Abundance Data&rft.identifier=http://geonetwork.tern.org.au/geonetwork/srv/eng/catalog.search#/metadata/72fc29ec-6cda-4454-8157-e83c4dda74a3&rft.publisher=Terrestrial Ecosystem Research Network&rft.description=This data contains ant abundance and incidence collected at two time points (1996 - 1997 and 2012 - 2013) along the Northern Australian Tropical Transect (NATT).More detailed methodology can be found in the following papers for the 1996 - 1997 data (Andersen et al 2015) and 2012 - 2013 data (Del Toro et al 2019)Data CreationAnt sampling 1996 - 1997 data: Ants were sampled at five locations along the NATT, ranging from Annaburro Station (approximately 1400 mm mean annual rainfall) in the north to the Kalkarindji region (650 mm) in the south, a distance of approximately 600 km. Within each of the five sites, three 1-ha plots were established, one each on sand, loam and clay soil. Ants were sampled using two 5 x 3 grids of pitfall traps located at opposite corners of each plot, with 10 m spacing between traps (total of 40 traps per plot). Traps were plastic containers 8.5 cm in diameter, partly filled with a 70% ethanol/glycol mixture as a preservative, and operated for a 48-h period on three occasions covering a range of seasonal conditions. Ant abundance and incidence was pooled at the plot level.Ant sampling 2012 - 2013 data: Ants were sampled at 15 sites along the NATT over a distance of approximately 800 km on two occasions, just before (October) and after (May) the 2012–2013 wet season. Ants were sampled along a 400 m linear transect ~100 m from the edge of the highway. At each site and during each sampling event, 40 pitfall traps (8.5 cm diameter) filled with ethylene glycol were buried flush with the ground and allowed to collect ground-foraging invertebrates for 5 days.Ant species identification: Ant specimens were identified and curated at the CSIRO's Tropical Ecosystems Research Centre in Darwin by Dr Alan Andersen.&rft.creator=Andersen, Alan &rft.date=2022&rft.edition=1.0&rft.coverage=The Northern Australian Tropical Transect is a 1,000 km long transect that starts outside Darwin and stretches into the dry heart of the Northern Territory. It covers the tropical savanna ecosystems, and encompasses a variety of soil types The dominant vegetation throughout is eucalypt-dominated savanna woodland.&rft.coverage=northlimit=-12.68; southlimit=-18.366; westlimit=133.80; eastLimit=131.00; projection=EPSG:4326&rft_rights=Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International Licence http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0&rft_rights=TERN services are provided on an as-is and as available basis. Users use any TERN services at their discretion and risk. They will be solely responsible for any damage or loss whatsoever that results from such use including use of any data obtained through TERN and any analysis performed using the TERN infrastructure. <br />Web links to and from external, third party websites should not be construed as implying any relationships with and/or endorsement of the external site or its content by TERN. <br /><br />Please advise any work or publications that use this data via the online form at https://www.tern.org.au/research-publications/#reporting&rft_rights=Please cite this dataset as {Author} ({PublicationYear}). {Title}. {Version, as appropriate}. Terrestrial Ecosystem Research Network. Dataset. {Identifier}.&rft_subject=biota&rft_subject=environment&rft_subject=ANIMALS/INVERTEBRATES&rft_subject=EARTH SCIENCE&rft_subject=BIOLOGICAL CLASSIFICATION&rft_subject=ECOLOGICAL DYNAMICS&rft_subject=BIOSPHERE&rft_subject=ECOSYSTEM FUNCTIONS&rft_subject=ARTHROPODS&rft_subject=INSECTS&rft_subject=ECOLOGICAL APPLICATIONS&rft_subject=ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES&rft_subject=ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE AND MANAGEMENT&rft_subject=ECOLOGY&rft_subject=BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES&rft_subject=Wet Pitfall Trap&rft_subject=number of individual animals (Number)&rft_subject=Number&rft_subject=animal occurrence (Number)&rft_subject=scientific name (Unitless)&rft_subject=Unitless&rft_subject=field species name (Unitless)&rft_subject=incidence of animals (Number)&rft_subject=Point Resolution&rft_subject=Annual&rft_subject=INSECTA&rft_subject=ARTHROPODA&rft_subject=FORMICIDAE&rft_subject=Invertebrate&rft_subject=Ants&rft_subject=Northern Australian Tropical Transect&rft_subject=NATT&rft_subject=Tropical savanna&rft.type=dataset&rft.language=English Access the data

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International Licence
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0

TERN services are provided on an "as-is" and "as available" basis. Users use any TERN services at their discretion and risk. They will be solely responsible for any damage or loss whatsoever that results from such use including use of any data obtained through TERN and any analysis performed using the TERN infrastructure.
Web links to and from external, third party websites should not be construed as implying any relationships with and/or endorsement of the external site or its content by TERN.

Please advise any work or publications that use this data via the online form at https://www.tern.org.au/research-publications/#reporting

Please cite this dataset as {Author} ({PublicationYear}). {Title}. {Version, as appropriate}. Terrestrial Ecosystem Research Network. Dataset. {Identifier}.

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Brief description

This data contains ant abundance and incidence collected at two time points (1996 - 1997 and 2012 - 2013) along the Northern Australian Tropical Transect (NATT).

Lineage

More detailed methodology can be found in the following papers for the 1996 - 1997 data (Andersen et al 2015) and 2012 - 2013 data (Del Toro et al 2019)

Data Creation
Ant sampling 1996 - 1997 data: Ants were sampled at five locations along the NATT, ranging from Annaburro Station (approximately 1400 mm mean annual rainfall) in the north to the Kalkarindji region (650 mm) in the south, a distance of approximately 600 km. Within each of the five sites, three 1-ha plots were established, one each on sand, loam and clay soil. Ants were sampled using two 5 x 3 grids of pitfall traps located at opposite corners of each plot, with 10 m spacing between traps (total of 40 traps per plot). Traps were plastic containers 8.5 cm in diameter, partly filled with a 70% ethanol/glycol mixture as a preservative, and operated for a 48-h period on three occasions covering a range of seasonal conditions. Ant abundance and incidence was pooled at the plot level.
Ant sampling 2012 - 2013 data: Ants were sampled at 15 sites along the NATT over a distance of approximately 800 km on two occasions, just before (October) and after (May) the 2012–2013 wet season. Ants were sampled along a 400 m linear transect ~100 m from the edge of the highway. At each site and during each sampling event, 40 pitfall traps (8.5 cm diameter) filled with ethylene glycol were buried flush with the ground and allowed to collect ground-foraging invertebrates for 5 days.
Ant species identification: Ant specimens were identified and curated at the CSIRO's Tropical Ecosystems Research Centre in Darwin by Dr Alan Andersen.

Notes

Credit
This work was funded by the Terrestrial Ecosystem Research Network (TERN), an Australian Government National Collaborative Research Infrastructure Strategy (NCRIS) project.
We at TERN acknowledge the Traditional Owners and Custodians throughout Australia, New Zealand and all nations. We honour their profound connections to land, water, biodiversity and culture and pay our respects to their Elders past, present and emerging.
Purpose
Ants are Australia’s dominant faunal group in terms of biomass and energy flow. They occupy all trophic levels, act as ecosystem engineers, feature in many mutualistic interactions with plants, and are a key food resource for many vertebrates. Ants are also Australia’s best studied insect group in terms of biogeography and community dynamics. They are the most widely used invertebrate bio-indicators in environmental assessment and monitoring.

Created: 2022-05-05

Modified: 2014-07-14

Issued: 2022-05-16

Data time period: 1996-07-01

Click to explore relationships graph

131,-12.68 131,-18.366 133.8,-18.366 133.8,-12.68 131,-12.68

132.4,-15.523

text: The Northern Australian Tropical Transect is a 1,000 km long transect that starts outside Darwin and stretches into the dry heart of the Northern Territory. It covers the tropical savanna ecosystems, and encompasses a variety of soil types The dominant vegetation throughout is eucalypt-dominated savanna woodland.

Other Information
Point-of-truth metadata URL

uri : https://geonetwork.tern.org.au/geonetwork/srv/eng/catalog.search#/metadata/72fc29ec-6cda-4454-8157-e83c4dda74a3

Andersen, A.N., Del Toro, I. and Parr, C.L. (2015), Savanna ant species richness is maintained along a bioclimatic gradient of increasing latitude and decreasing rainfall in northern Australia. J. Biogeogr., 42: 2313-2322.

doi : https://doi.org/10.1111/jbi.12599

Del Toro, I., Ribbons, R.R., Hayward, J. and Andersen, A.N. (2019), Are stacked species distribution models accurate at predicting multiple levels of diversity along a rainfall gradient?. Austral Ecology, 44: 105-113.

doi : https://doi.org/10.1111/aec.12658