Dataset

Neurological effects of verbal cueing during hand-grip task

Deakin University
Ashlee Hendy (Associated with) Dr Eric Drinkwater (Aggregated by) Mr Hans Leung (Aggregated by)
Viewed: [[ro.stat.viewed]] Cited: [[ro.stat.cited]] Accessed: [[ro.stat.accessed]]
ctx_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info%3Aofi%2Ffmt%3Akev%3Amtx%3Adc&rfr_id=info%3Asid%2FANDS&rft_id=info:doi10.26187/60ad872655d95&rft.title=Neurological effects of verbal cueing during hand-grip task&rft.identifier=10.26187/60ad872655d95&rft.publisher=Deakin University&rft.description=The project seeks to investigate the effects of verbal cueing for high intended movement velocity (HIMV) compared to traditional maximal cueing (TRAD) on properties of corticospinal excitability and inhibition during muscle contraction.Collectively, the current literature is unable to provide a definitive conclusion on the effectiveness of training with high intended movement velocity, or the physiological differences in contrcations performed under different cueing conditions. This gap in knowledge is of significant concern, given the widespread use of this method in elite and recreational level resistance training. Furthermore, by filling this gap in knowledge, cueing techniques may be found to optimise physical and phsyiological outcomes for populations where high intensity training is limited by disease or injury.Data gathered will include muscle strength outcome measures (maximal isometric contraction force, rate of force development) and outcomes of neurological testing (muscle twitch forces and responses to brain and nerve stimulation recorded via electromyography). We will also report the height, weight, age and gender of participants. Information collected during the health screening will only be used to confirm the participant’s eligibility for the study, and will not serve as outcomes for the study. &rft.creator=Dr Eric Drinkwater&rft.creator=Mr Hans Leung&rft.date=2021&rft.coverage=Deakin University&rft_rights=2021, Deakin University&rft_subject=TMS, HIMV, corticospinal excitability, MEPs&rft_subject=Central Nervous System&rft_subject=MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES&rft_subject=NEUROSCIENCES&rft_subject=Motor Control&rft_subject=HUMAN MOVEMENT AND SPORTS SCIENCE&rft_subject=Health not elsewhere classified&rft_subject=HEALTH&rft_subject=OTHER HEALTH&rft_subject=Strategic&rft.type=dataset&rft.language=English Access the data

Licence & Rights:

view details

2021, Deakin University

Access:

Other view details

Please contact the Chief Investigator, Data Manager or Supervisor to negotiate access to the data.

Contact Information

Postal Address:
Leung, Hans

hans.leung@deakin.edu.au

Full description

The project seeks to investigate the effects of verbal cueing for high intended movement velocity (HIMV) compared to traditional maximal cueing (TRAD) on properties of corticospinal excitability and inhibition during muscle contraction.

Collectively, the current literature is unable to provide a definitive conclusion on the effectiveness of training with high intended movement velocity, or the physiological differences in contrcations performed under different cueing conditions. This gap in knowledge is of significant concern, given the widespread use of this method in elite and recreational level resistance training. Furthermore, by filling this gap in knowledge, cueing techniques may be found to optimise physical and phsyiological outcomes for populations where high intensity training is limited by disease or injury.

Data gathered will include muscle strength outcome measures (maximal isometric contraction force, rate of force development) and outcomes of neurological testing (muscle twitch forces and responses to brain and nerve stimulation recorded via electromyography). We will also report the height, weight, age and gender of participants. Information collected during the health screening will only be used to confirm the participant’s eligibility for the study, and will not serve as outcomes for the study.

 

Data time period: 06 2021 to 31 12 2021

Click to explore relationships graph

Spatial Coverage And Location

text: Deakin University