Dataset

Monthly distributions of Cassowary (Casuarius casuarius) in Australia

James Cook University
Jeremy James VanDerWal (Associated with, Aggregated by)
Viewed: [[ro.stat.viewed]] Cited: [[ro.stat.cited]] Accessed: [[ro.stat.accessed]]
ctx_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info%3Aofi%2Ffmt%3Akev%3Amtx%3Adc&rfr_id=info%3Asid%2FANDS&rft_id=https://research.jcu.edu.au/researchdata/published/detail/bba7da507894f7e50300113230f2873c&rft.title=Monthly distributions of Cassowary (Casuarius casuarius) in Australia&rft.identifier=jcu.edu.au/tdh/collection/60cb288b-f8bc-41ff-b284-9682cddbcbf0&rft.publisher=James Cook University&rft.description=Over 14 million occurrence records of 950+ Australian bird species were collated across the period 1950 to 2011 from personal, public and institutional databases. Only species with >20 unique spatiotemporal records were used for modelling. Daily precipitation and temperature minima and maxima from 1950 until 2011 at a 0.05° grid scale were accessed from the Australian Water Availability Project (AWAP -- http://www.bom.gov.au/jsp/awap/) (Jones et al 2007, Grant et al 2008). From this, we calculated annual mean temperature, temperature seasonality, max and min monthly temperature, annual precipitation, precipitation seasonality, and precipitation of the wettest and driest quarters at time lags of three, six, nine and twelve months previous to each month that a bird was recorded within the period 1950 to 2011. However, initial models and work reported in Reside et al (2010), we only used the 12 month time lag. Species distribution models were run using the presence-only modelling program Maxent (Phillips et al 2006). Maxent uses species presence records to statistically relate species occurrence to environmental variables on the principle of maximum entropy. The model weather data consisted of each unique combination of month, year, latitude and longitude of each bird sighting, and the corresponding weather for each relevant time period. All default settings were used except for background point allocation. We used a target group background (Phillips & Dudik 2008) to remove any spatial or temporal sampling bias in the modelling exercise. REFERENCES Jones DA, Wang W, Fawcett R (2007) Climate Data for the Australian Water Availability Project: Final Milestone Report. National Climate Centre, Australian Bureau of Meteorology. Grant I, Jones D, Wang W, Fawcett R, Barratt D (2008) Meteorological and remotely sensed datasets for hydrological modelling: a contribution to the Australian Water Availability Project. Reside A, VanDerWal J, Kutt AS, & Perkins G. (2010) Weather, not climate, defines distributions of vagile species. PlosOne 5(10):e13569. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0013569 Phillips SJ, Anderson RP, Schapire RE (2006) Maximum entropy modeling of species geographic distributions. Ecological Modelling 190: 231–259. Phillips SJ, Dudik M (2008) Modeling of species distributions with Maxent: new extensions and a comprehensive evaluation. Ecography 31: 161–175.This is the monthly distributions of Cassowary (Casuarius casuarius) in Australia. The monthly times time steps were created using the methods defined in Reside et al (2010).&rft.creator=Jeremy James VanDerWal&rft.date=2011&rft.coverage=110.923485004,-21.7246890083 131.13832875,-10.4293501035 144.321922498,-10.4293501035 155.044578746,-26.8494487331 147.661766247,-44.5481152547 131.84145375,-33.5284712035 114.263328753,-36.5501460046 110.923485004,-21.7246890083&rft_subject=species distribution&rft_subject=cassowary&rft_subject=casuarius casuarius&rft_subject=Ecological Impacts of Climate Change&rft_subject=ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES&rft_subject=ECOLOGICAL APPLICATIONS&rft.type=dataset&rft.language=English Access the data

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Open view details

Open Access. If the data is not available via the provided link, please contact an associated party (preferrably the Manager as specified) for access.

Contact Information

jeremy.vanderwal@jcu.edu.au

Centre for Tropical Biology and Climate Change Australian Tropical Science and Innovation Precinct 145 James Cook University Douglas Campus Townsville QLD 4811 +61 7 4781 5570

Brief description

This is the monthly distributions of Cassowary (Casuarius casuarius) in Australia. The monthly times time steps were created using the methods defined in Reside et al (2010).

Full description

Over 14 million occurrence records of 950+ Australian bird species were collated across the period 1950 to 2011 from personal, public and institutional databases. Only species with >20 unique spatiotemporal records were used for modelling. Daily precipitation and temperature minima and maxima from 1950 until 2011 at a 0.05° grid scale were accessed from the Australian Water Availability Project (AWAP -- http://www.bom.gov.au/jsp/awap/) (Jones et al 2007, Grant et al 2008). From this, we calculated annual mean temperature, temperature seasonality, max and min monthly temperature, annual precipitation, precipitation seasonality, and precipitation of the wettest and driest quarters at time lags of three, six, nine and twelve months previous to each month that a bird was recorded within the period 1950 to 2011. However, initial models and work reported in Reside et al (2010), we only used the 12 month time lag. Species distribution models were run using the presence-only modelling program Maxent (Phillips et al 2006). Maxent uses species presence records to statistically relate species occurrence to environmental variables on the principle of maximum entropy. The model weather data consisted of each unique combination of month, year, latitude and longitude of each bird sighting, and the corresponding weather for each relevant time period. All default settings were used except for background point allocation. We used a target group background (Phillips & Dudik 2008) to remove any spatial or temporal sampling bias in the modelling exercise. REFERENCES Jones DA, Wang W, Fawcett R (2007) Climate Data for the Australian Water Availability Project: Final Milestone Report. National Climate Centre, Australian Bureau of Meteorology. Grant I, Jones D, Wang W, Fawcett R, Barratt D (2008) Meteorological and remotely sensed datasets for hydrological modelling: a contribution to the Australian Water Availability Project. Reside A, VanDerWal J, Kutt AS, & Perkins G. (2010) Weather, not climate, defines distributions of vagile species. PlosOne 5(10):e13569. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0013569 Phillips SJ, Anderson RP, Schapire RE (2006) Maximum entropy modeling of species geographic distributions. Ecological Modelling 190: 231–259. Phillips SJ, Dudik M (2008) Modeling of species distributions with Maxent: new extensions and a comprehensive evaluation. Ecography 31: 161–175.

Created: 26 10 2011

Data time period: 31 12 1949 to 30 12 2011

Click to explore relationships graph

110.923485004,-21.7246890083 131.13832875,-10.4293501035 144.321922498,-10.4293501035 155.044578746,-26.8494487331 147.661766247,-44.5481152547 131.84145375,-33.5284712035 114.263328753,-36.5501460046 110.923485004,-21.7246890083

132.984031875,-27.4887326791

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Identifiers
  • Local : jcu.edu.au/tdh/collection/60cb288b-f8bc-41ff-b284-9682cddbcbf0