Dataset

Monitoring climate change induced desertification of Antarctica using stable isotopic signatures

Australian Antarctic Data Centre
ROBINSON, SHARON
Viewed: [[ro.stat.viewed]] Cited: [[ro.stat.cited]] Accessed: [[ro.stat.accessed]]
ctx_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info%3Aofi%2Ffmt%3Akev%3Amtx%3Adc&rfr_id=info%3Asid%2FANDS&rft_id=https://data.aad.gov.au/metadata/records/AAS_3129&rft.title=Monitoring climate change induced desertification of Antarctica using stable isotopic signatures&rft.identifier=https://data.aad.gov.au/metadata/records/AAS_3129&rft.publisher=Australian Antarctic Data Centre&rft.description=Metadata record for data from AAS (ASAC) project 3219. Public Summary We will use mosses to investigate the changing climate in Antarctica and the implications this has for terrestrial biodiversity. Mosses grow incrementally from the tip, thus shoot sections contain a record of atmospheric carbon corresponding to each growing season, in a similar fashion to tree rings. This method has been used to age East Antarctic mosses and indicates that some individuals are more than 60 years old. Analysing stable isotopes of carbon and oxygen in cell walls tells us how climate has changed around these mosses over time and allows us to determine which sites are drying and becoming inhospitable. Project Objectives Our hypothesis is that the carbon and oxygen isotope composition of bryophytes can be used as a proxy for desertification, inundation and precipitation regimes in Antarctica. We will determine whether stable isotopes of carbon and oxygen in plant tissues can be used as a surrogate for changes in effective growing season by determining whether they provide an accurate record of water availability to moss beds through time. To do this we will: 1) determine if long term water availability is accurately recorded in cell wall delta13C and delta18O signatures of moss, and if 2) short term, within/between season changes in moss submergence are reflected in the delta13C of sugars. In addition we will 3) measure instantaneous fractionation of carbon isotopes during photosynthesis in moss under different water availabilities. Taken from the 2010-2011 Progress Report Progress against objectives: Moss, snow and water samples for Objectives 1 and 3 were collected in February 2011. These were from ASPA136 (Stevenson's Cove and a ridge site near Whitney Pt), on Bailey Peninsula (ASPA135, Science and Red Shed locations) and from Robinson Ridge These samples have all been identified. Objective 2 requires a longer season and was not possible in the time available at Casey. Laboratory activity/analysis: These samples have all been identified at Wollongong Stable isotope analysis is planned for September-October 2011 in Vienna (Bramley-Alves and Robinson). An experiment to investigate the fractionation of mosses under different water availabilities is planned with some of the samples that were collected and transferred to ANU (Bramley-Alves, Robinson and Ball). Jess Bramley-Alves has applied for a 2011 AINSE Postgraduate Research Award, which would provide research funding and access to radiocarbon dating facilities at ANSTO. This will allow us to date the samples and track stable isotope changes over time. Transplant experiment will be conducted and additional samples will be collected in 2011/12 These will be analysed in 2012. Progress to date is excellent given the short season at Casey.&rft.creator=ROBINSON, SHARON &rft.date=2011&rft.coverage=northlimit=-66.0; southlimit=-66.5; westlimit=110.0; eastLimit=110.5; projection=WGS84&rft.coverage=northlimit=-66.0; southlimit=-66.5; westlimit=110.0; eastLimit=110.5; projection=WGS84&rft_rights=This data set conforms to the CCBY Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/). Please follow instructions listed in the citation reference provided at http://data.aad.gov.au/aadc/metadata/citation.cfm?entry_id=AAS_3129 when using these data.&rft_subject=biota&rft_subject=FOREST COMPOSITION/VEGETATION STRUCTURE&rft_subject=EARTH SCIENCE&rft_subject=BIOSPHERE&rft_subject=VEGETATION&rft_subject=VEGETATION COVER&rft_subject=VEGETATION INDEX&rft_subject=VEGETATION SPECIES&rft_subject=DESERTIFICATION&rft_subject=HUMAN DIMENSIONS&rft_subject=HABITAT CONVERSION/FRAGMENTATION&rft_subject=MOSSES/HORNWORTS/LIVERWORTS&rft_subject=BIOLOGICAL CLASSIFICATION&rft_subject=PLANTS&rft_subject=CARBON AND HYDROCARBON COMPOUNDS&rft_subject=ATMOSPHERE&rft_subject=ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY&rft_subject=OXYGEN COMPOUNDS&rft_subject=VEGETATION WATER CONTENT&rft_subject=PLANT CHARACTERISTICS&rft_subject=Climate Change&rft_subject=Moss&rft_subject=Carbon&rft_subject=Oxygen&rft_subject=FIELD SURVEYS&rft_subject=LABORATORY&rft_subject=FIELD INVESTIGATION&rft_subject=CONTINENT > ANTARCTICA&rft_subject=GEOGRAPHIC REGION > POLAR&rft_place=Hobart&rft.type=dataset&rft.language=English Access the data

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This data set conforms to the CCBY Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/). Please follow instructions listed in the citation reference provided at http://data.aad.gov.au/aadc/metadata/citation.cfm?entry_id=AAS_3129 when using these data.

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The full dataset for this project is not yet publicly available. A copy of the species list collated during data collection is available for download from the provided URL.

Brief description

Metadata record for data from AAS (ASAC) project 3219.

Public Summary
We will use mosses to investigate the changing climate in Antarctica and the implications this has for terrestrial biodiversity. Mosses grow incrementally from the tip, thus shoot sections contain a record of atmospheric carbon corresponding to each growing season, in a similar fashion to tree rings. This method has been used to age East Antarctic mosses and indicates that some individuals are more than 60 years old. Analysing stable isotopes of carbon and oxygen in cell walls tells us how climate has changed around these mosses over time and allows us to determine which sites are drying and becoming inhospitable.

Project Objectives
Our hypothesis is that the carbon and oxygen isotope composition of bryophytes can be used as a proxy for desertification, inundation and precipitation regimes in Antarctica.

We will determine whether stable isotopes of carbon and oxygen in plant tissues can be used as a surrogate for changes in effective growing season by determining whether they provide an accurate record of water availability to moss beds through time. To do this we will:

1) determine if long term water availability is accurately recorded in cell wall delta13C and delta18O signatures of moss, and if
2) short term, within/between season changes in moss submergence are reflected in the delta13C of sugars. In addition we will
3) measure instantaneous fractionation of carbon isotopes during photosynthesis in moss under different water availabilities.

Taken from the 2010-2011 Progress Report
Progress against objectives:
Moss, snow and water samples for Objectives 1 and 3 were collected in February 2011. These were from ASPA136 (Stevenson's Cove and a ridge site near Whitney Pt), on Bailey Peninsula (ASPA135, Science and Red Shed locations) and from Robinson Ridge
These samples have all been identified.

Objective 2 requires a longer season and was not possible in the time available at Casey.

Laboratory activity/analysis:
These samples have all been identified at Wollongong
Stable isotope analysis is planned for September-October 2011 in Vienna (Bramley-Alves and Robinson).
An experiment to investigate the fractionation of mosses under different water availabilities is planned with some of the samples that were collected and transferred to ANU (Bramley-Alves, Robinson and Ball).

Jess Bramley-Alves has applied for a 2011 AINSE Postgraduate Research Award, which would provide research funding and access to radiocarbon dating facilities at ANSTO. This will allow us to date the samples and track stable isotope changes over time.

Transplant experiment will be conducted and additional samples will be collected in 2011/12
These will be analysed in 2012.

Progress to date is excellent given the short season at Casey.

Issued: 2011-04-29

Data time period: 2010-10-01 to 2013-03-31

Click to explore relationships graph

110.5,-66 110.5,-66.5 110,-66.5 110,-66 110.5,-66

110.25,-66.25

text: northlimit=-66.0; southlimit=-66.5; westlimit=110.0; eastLimit=110.5; projection=WGS84

Identifiers