grant

MODIFICATION OF TUBULE CELL CYTOKINES REGULATING INTERSTITIAL INFLAMMATION IN CHRONIC PROTEINURIC RENAL DISEASE [ 2000 - 2002 ]

Also known as: MODIFICATION OF KIDNEY CELL INFLAMMATORY MEDIATORS IN CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE

Research Grant

[Cite as http://purl.org/au-research/grants/nhmrc/107238]

Researchers: Prof David Harris (Principal investigator)

Brief description Current treatments for chronic kidney disease are ineffective. As a consequence, kidney failure progresses to the stage where patients require dialysis or transplantation to remain alive. Every year 1500 Australians commence dialysis for this reason, and many more die of kidney failure or its complications. One of the major reasons for progression of kidney failure is that kidney cells produce a complex network of inflammatory mediators (cytokines) which attract inflammatory cells into the supporting tissue of the kidney (the interstitium). Recently, drugs that inhibit these cytokines have been used in animal models of chronic kidney disease. Such treatment regimens have been at most only partially effective because they have been directed against only one cytokine, and because they have ignored the fact that the profile of cytokines varies with stage of disease. This project will use a rodent model (Adriamycin nephrosis) of human chronic kidney disease to define strategies for preventing interstitial inflammation using anti-cytokine therapy. Our laboratory has identified three cytokines which appear to play a pivotal role in the development of interstitial inflammation in Adriamycin nephrosis, and shown that their production varies with time. Knowledge of the time-dependent interactions among and regulation of these cytokines will be used to define optimal delivery of therapy directed against all three cytokines. As anti-cytokine therapy is already being trialled in other types of (non-kidney) disease in humans, the success of such a therapeutic approach to treating progressive kidney disease in this animal model will have important and immediate implications for the treatment of chronic kidney disease in humans.

Funding Amount $AUD 294,121.04

Funding Scheme NHMRC Project Grants

Notes Standard Project Grant

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