Data

Mining Warden's Register of Applications for Gold Mining Leases, Taradale and Kyneton

Public Record Office Victoria
Castlemaine Mining District (Has creator ) Department of Agriculture, Energy and Minerals (Owned by)
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ctx_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info%3Aofi%2Ffmt%3Akev%3Amtx%3Adc&rfr_id=info%3Asid%2FANDS&rft_id=http://www.access.prov.vic.gov.au/public/component/daPublicBaseContainer?component=daViewSeries&breadcrumbPath=Home/Access%20the%20Collection/Browse%20The%20Collection/Series%20Details&entityId=9687&rft.title=Mining Warden's Register of Applications for Gold Mining Leases, Taradale and Kyneton&rft.identifier=VPRS 9687&rft.publisher=Public Record Office Victoria&rft.description=Background: Mining DistrictsBetween 1855 and 1975 the administration of mining in Victoria was partly carried out at a district level. In the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries district mining officials had extensive administrative and judicial responsibilities. Over time the role of district officials diminished as the function gradually became more centralised.The boundaries of each Mining District were proclaimed by the Governor-in-Council. Each District was divided into several divisions which at times were further subdivided. It is important to note that the names and boundaries of the Districts, Divisions and Subdivisions changed over time as the scale of mining activity in various locations changed. Victorian Government Gazettes provide information about the boundaries of mining areasThe first six Districts were established in 1858. They were: Ararat, Ballarat, Beechworth, Castlemaine, Maryborough and Sandhurst. In 1866 a seventh district - Gippsland - was proclaimed. These seven districts existed through to 1975, however, there were changes to their names (namely Sandhurst to Bendigo in 1898 and Ararat to Ararat and Stawell in 1899).Administration of mining activity took place at both the District and Divisional level. The names of the Districts and Divisions do not necessarily indicate the location of the offices of the mining officials.Mining WardensMining Wardens were known initially as Wardens of the Goldfield. They were empowered under legislation with both administrative and judicial responsibilities. Because of their judicial function they were also known as Warden's Courts. Wardens were usually also Police Magistrates and were appointed by the Governor-in-Council. In their judicial function Wardens were empowered to hear and rule upon territory-related mining disputes such as disputes over the boundaries of claims, trespassing, interference with water rights and the interests of parties in claims. Wardens endeavoured to provide on-the-spot justice without complicated and lengthy legal proceedings. Disputes before Wardens were usually heard on site rather than in a Courtroom. In their administrative role the Wardens were responsible for registering and monitoring various leases and licences.Mining Districts generally had between three and six Mining Wardens, with most Wardens having responsibility for more than one Division.The position of Mining Warden was abolished in 1969 by the Mines (Abolition of Courts) Act and the function was taken over by Courts of Petty Sessions (later Magistrates' Courts).Mining Warden's Registers of Applications for Mining Leases/LicencesIn their administrative role Mining Wardens were required to receive and register applications for various mining leases and licences in their area. The types of lease and licence applications which could have been registered include:Gold Mining Leases (often known simply as Mining Leases) from 1859Mineral Leases from 1861Mineral Search Licences from 1862Gold Mining Leases on Reserved Land from 1873 Property Leases from 1885Tailings Licences from 1897Petroleum Prospecting Licences from 1935Petroleum Mineral Leases from 1935.It is not certain that all of these types of lease or licence were registered by the Wardens.To 1915 lease or licence applications were submitted firstly to the District Warden and then forwarded to the Mines Department in Melbourne. From 1915 applications were required to be submitted direct to the Department and from there were forwarded to the Warden.Separate registers were usually used for the different types of applications although this may not have always been the case. Applications were entered in the registers in chronological order as they were received and were numbered sequentially. In some registers the numbering sequence recommences at number 1 at the beginning of each year whilst in others the numbering sequence continues across several years. This practice appears to have varied over time and between mining divisions.&rft.creator=Department of Agriculture, Energy and Minerals&rft.date=1931&rft.coverage=141.000000,-34.000000 142.919336,-34.145604 144.582129,-35.659230 147.742627,-35.873175 150.024219,-37.529041 150.200000,-39.200000 141.000000,-39.200000 141.000000,-34.000000 141.000000,-34.000000&rft_rights=Records held by Public Record Office Victoria (PROV) are covered by copyright. For information on reusing material from the collection see PROVguide 25 http://prov.vic.gov.au/provguide-25&rft_subject=HISTORICAL STUDIES&rft_subject=HISTORY AND ARCHAEOLOGY&rft.type=dataset&rft.language=English Access the data

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Records held by Public Record Office Victoria (PROV) are covered by copyright. For information on reusing material from the collection see PROVguide 25
http://prov.vic.gov.au/provguide-25

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Victorian Archives Centre
99 Shiel St North Melbourne VIC 3051, Australia
Ph: +61 3 9348 5600



Full description

Background: Mining Districts

Between 1855 and 1975 the administration of mining in Victoria was partly carried out at a district level. In the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries district mining officials had extensive administrative and judicial responsibilities. Over time the role of district officials diminished as the function gradually became more centralised.

The boundaries of each Mining District were proclaimed by the Governor-in-Council. Each District was divided into several divisions which at times were further subdivided. It is important to note that the names and boundaries of the Districts, Divisions and Subdivisions changed over time as the scale of mining activity in various locations changed. Victorian Government Gazettes provide information about the boundaries of mining areas

The first six Districts were established in 1858. They were: Ararat, Ballarat, Beechworth, Castlemaine, Maryborough and Sandhurst. In 1866 a seventh district - Gippsland - was proclaimed. These seven districts existed through to 1975, however, there were changes to their names (namely Sandhurst to Bendigo in 1898 and Ararat to Ararat and Stawell in 1899).

Administration of mining activity took place at both the District and Divisional level. The names of the Districts and Divisions do not necessarily indicate the location of the offices of the mining officials.

Mining Wardens

Mining Wardens were known initially as Wardens of the Goldfield. They were empowered under legislation with both administrative and judicial responsibilities. Because of their judicial function they were also known as Warden's Courts. Wardens were usually also Police Magistrates and were appointed by the Governor-in-Council. In their judicial function Wardens were empowered to hear and rule upon territory-related mining disputes such as disputes over the boundaries of claims, trespassing, interference with water rights and the interests of parties in claims. Wardens endeavoured to provide "on-the-spot" justice without complicated and lengthy legal proceedings. Disputes before Wardens were usually heard on site rather than in a Courtroom. In their administrative role the Wardens were responsible for registering and monitoring various leases and licences.

Mining Districts generally had between three and six Mining Wardens, with most Wardens having responsibility for more than one Division.

The position of Mining Warden was abolished in 1969 by the Mines (Abolition of Courts) Act and the function was taken over by Courts of Petty Sessions (later Magistrates' Courts).



Mining Warden's Registers of Applications for Mining Leases/Licences

In their administrative role Mining Wardens were required to receive and register applications for various mining leases and licences in their area. The types of lease and licence applications which could have been registered include:
Gold Mining Leases (often known simply as Mining Leases) from 1859
Mineral Leases from 1861
Mineral Search Licences from 1862
Gold Mining Leases on Reserved Land from 1873
Property Leases from 1885
Tailings Licences from 1897
Petroleum Prospecting Licences from 1935
Petroleum Mineral Leases from 1935.
It is not certain that all of these types of lease or licence were registered by the Wardens.

To 1915 lease or licence applications were submitted firstly to the District Warden and then forwarded to the Mines Department in Melbourne. From 1915 applications were required to be submitted direct to the Department and from there were forwarded to the Warden.

Separate registers were usually used for the different types of applications although this may not have always been the case. Applications were entered in the registers in chronological order as they were received and were numbered sequentially. In some registers the numbering sequence recommences at number 1 at the beginning of each year whilst in others the numbering sequence continues across several years. This practice appears to have varied over time and between mining divisions.

Created: 1905 to 1931

Data time period: 1905 to 1931

Data time period: Series date range : BY 1905 - ?
Series in custody date range : 1905 - 1931
Contents in custody date range : 1905 - 1931

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141.000000,-34.000000 142.919336,-34.145604 144.582129,-35.659230 147.742627,-35.873175 150.024219,-37.529041 150.200000,-39.200000 141.000000,-39.200000 141.000000,-34.000000 141.000000,-34.000000

145.6,-36.6

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Identifiers
  • Local : VPRS 9687