Dataset

Microhabitat selection by wolf spiders and dunnarts

Advanced Ecological Knowledge and Observation System
Potter, TI ; Greenville, AC ; Dickman, CR
Viewed: [[ro.stat.viewed]] Cited: [[ro.stat.cited]] Accessed: [[ro.stat.accessed]]
ctx_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info%3Aofi%2Ffmt%3Akev%3Amtx%3Adc&rfr_id=info%3Asid%2FANDS&rft_id=info:doi10.4227/05/5a1f43d3542e5&rft.title=Microhabitat selection by wolf spiders and dunnarts&rft.identifier=http://doi.org/10.4227/05/5a1f43d3542e5&rft.publisher=ÆKOS Data Portal, rights owned by University of Sydney&rft.description=The lesser hairy­footed dunnart (Sminthopsis youngsoni, Dasyuridae) is a generalist marsupial insectivore in arid Australia, but consumes wolf spiders (Lycosa spp., Lycosidae) disproportionately often relative to their availability. This project tested the hypothesis that this disproportionate predation is a product of frequent encounter rates between the interactants due to high overlap in their diets and use of space and time. This data set focuses on overlap in the use of different microhabitats of wolf spiders (Lycosa spp.) and the lesser hairy­footed dunnart (Sminthopsis youngsoni) in the Simpson Desert, south­western Queensland Australia. Microhabitat use was determined by estimating the percentage cover of seven microhabitat variables and distance to nearest cover along trails left by individuals of each species­group and a randomly orientated (control) trail for each actual trail as a measure of the availability of each microhabitat within the local environment. Trail length was also recorded and data was collected across 16 trapping grids at Main Camp during July and October (winter and Spring) in 2017. Differences in microhabitat use between trail types (actual vs control) and species (lycosids vs dunnarts) were assessed using non­metric multidimensional scaling (nMDS) and permutational analyses of variance (PERMANOVA). These analyses were performed using this data.&rft.creator=Anonymous&rft.date=2017&rft.coverage=The study was undertaken around Main Camp site on Ethabuka Reserve, north-western Simpson Desert, Queensland.&rft.coverage=northlimit=-23.54228; southlimit=-23.74104; eastlimit=138.75649; westlimit=138.40768; projection=GDA94&rft_rights=(C)2017 University of Sydney. Rights owned by University of Sydney. Rights licensed subject to Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International.&rft_rights=Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International&rft_subject=ECOLOGY&rft_subject=BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES&rft_subject=Terrestrial Ecology&rft_subject=FLORA, FAUNA AND BIODIVERSITY&rft_subject=ENVIRONMENT&rft_subject=Behavioural Ecology&rft_subject=Predator-Prey Interactions&rft_subject=Arid ecology&rft_subject=None&rft.type=dataset&rft.language=English ctx_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info%3Aofi%2Ffmt%3Akev%3Amtx%3Adc&rfr_id=info%3Asid%2FANDS&rft_id=info:doi10.4227/05/5a1f43d3542e5&rft.title=Microhabitat selection by wolf spiders and dunnarts&rft.identifier=http://doi.org/10.4227/05/5a1f43d3542e5&rft.publisher=ÆKOS Data Portal, rights owned by University of Sydney&rft.description=The lesser hairy­footed dunnart (Sminthopsis youngsoni, Dasyuridae) is a generalist marsupial insectivore in arid Australia, but consumes wolf spiders (Lycosa spp., Lycosidae) disproportionately often relative to their availability. This project tested the hypothesis that this disproportionate predation is a product of frequent encounter rates between the interactants due to high overlap in their diets and use of space and time. This data set focuses on overlap in the use of different microhabitats of wolf spiders (Lycosa spp.) and the lesser hairy­footed dunnart (Sminthopsis youngsoni) in the Simpson Desert, south­western Queensland Australia. Microhabitat use was determined by estimating the percentage cover of seven microhabitat variables and distance to nearest cover along trails left by individuals of each species­group and a randomly orientated (control) trail for each actual trail as a measure of the availability of each microhabitat within the local environment. Trail length was also recorded and data was collected across 16 trapping grids at Main Camp during July and October (winter and Spring) in 2017. Differences in microhabitat use between trail types (actual vs control) and species (lycosids vs dunnarts) were assessed using non­metric multidimensional scaling (nMDS) and permutational analyses of variance (PERMANOVA). These analyses were performed using this data.&rft.creator=Anonymous&rft.date=2017&rft.coverage=The study was undertaken around Main Camp site on Ethabuka Reserve, north-western Simpson Desert, Queensland.&rft.coverage=northlimit=-23.54228; southlimit=-23.74104; eastlimit=138.75649; westlimit=138.40768; projection=GDA94&rft_rights=(C)2017 University of Sydney. Rights owned by University of Sydney. Rights licensed subject to Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International.&rft_rights=Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International&rft_subject=ECOLOGY&rft_subject=BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES&rft_subject=Terrestrial Ecology&rft_subject=FLORA, FAUNA AND BIODIVERSITY&rft_subject=ENVIRONMENT&rft_subject=Behavioural Ecology&rft_subject=Predator-Prey Interactions&rft_subject=Arid ecology&rft_subject=None&rft.type=dataset&rft.language=English Access the data

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

(C)2017 University of Sydney. Rights owned by University of Sydney. Rights licensed subject to Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International.

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These data can be freely downloaded via the Advanced Ecological Knowledge and Observation System (ÆKOS) Data Portal and used subject to the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International. Attribution and citation is required as described under License and Citation. We ask you to send citations of publications arising from work that use these data to TERN Eco-informatics at datacited@aekos.org.au and citation and copies of publications to tamarapotter244@gmail.com

Contact Information

Street Address:
Tamara Potter
University of Sydney
Heydon­Laurence Building, Science Road, University of Sydney, Camperdown 2050
Ph: 0457982001

tamarapotter244@gmail.com

Full description

The lesser hairy­footed dunnart (Sminthopsis youngsoni, Dasyuridae) is a generalist marsupial insectivore in arid Australia, but consumes wolf spiders (Lycosa spp., Lycosidae) disproportionately often relative to their availability. This project tested the hypothesis that this disproportionate predation is a product of frequent encounter rates between the interactants due to high overlap in their diets and use of space and time. This data set focuses on overlap in the use of different microhabitats of wolf spiders (Lycosa spp.) and the lesser hairy­footed dunnart (Sminthopsis youngsoni) in the Simpson Desert, south­western Queensland Australia. Microhabitat use was determined by estimating the percentage cover of seven microhabitat variables and distance to nearest cover along trails left by individuals of each species­group and a randomly orientated (control) trail for each actual trail as a measure of the availability of each microhabitat within the local environment. Trail length was also recorded and data was collected across 16 trapping grids at Main Camp during July and October (winter and Spring) in 2017. Differences in microhabitat use between trail types (actual vs control) and species (lycosids vs dunnarts) were assessed using non­metric multidimensional scaling (nMDS) and permutational analyses of variance (PERMANOVA). These analyses were performed using this data.

Date Submitted : 2017-11-29

Date Accepted : 2017-11-29

Data time period: 2016-07-01 to 2016-10-23

138.75649,-23.54228 138.75649,-23.74104 138.40768,-23.74104 138.40768,-23.54228 138.75649,-23.54228

138.582085,-23.64166

text: The study was undertaken around Main Camp site on Ethabuka Reserve, north-western Simpson Desert, Queensland.

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Identifiers
  • Local : aekos.org.au/collection/shared/366713