Data

Marine Futures Project - Point Ann - biota

University of Tasmania, Australia
Meeuwig, Jessica ; Radford, Ben
Viewed: [[ro.stat.viewed]] Cited: [[ro.stat.cited]] Accessed: [[ro.stat.accessed]]
ctx_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info%3Aofi%2Ffmt%3Akev%3Amtx%3Adc&rfr_id=info%3Asid%2FANDS&rft_id=http://metadata.imas.utas.edu.au/geonetwork/srv/eng/search?uuid=26c070dc-d529-4562-8054-bbc94de25e8e&rft.title=Marine Futures Project - Point Ann - biota&rft.identifier=http://metadata.imas.utas.edu.au/geonetwork/srv/eng/search?uuid=26c070dc-d529-4562-8054-bbc94de25e8e&rft.description=The Marine Futures Project was designed to benchmark the current status of key Western Australian marine ecosystems, based on an improved understanding of the relationship between marine habitats, biodiversity and our use of these values. Approximately 1,500 km2 of seafloor were mapped using hydroacoustics (Reson 8101 Multibeam), and expected benthic habitats ground-truthed using towed video transects and baited remote underwater video systems. Both sources of information were then combined in a spatial predictive modelling framework to produce fine-scale habitat maps showing the extent of substrate types, biotic formations, etc. Surveys took place across 9 study areas, including Point Ann, a site which lies within the Fitzgerald Biosphere, a UNESCO designated International Biosphere Reserve and one of the largest and biologically significant National Parks in Australia (DEC) on West Australia’s south coast, approximately 180km east of Albany.Areas of seafloor in water deeper than 10 metres were surveyed with hydroacoustics using a Reson 8101 Multibeam or interferometric swath echosounder system, mounted on the hull of the sampling vessel. These data were processed to construct full coverage maps of seafloor bathymetry and textural information. These maps, combined with observations recorded from in situ video footage, unerpinned the development of statistical models that produced the most efficient, objective, and ecologically meaningful classifications of sea floor features and inhabitants as possible for natural resource management and planning.&rft.creator=Meeuwig, Jessica &rft.creator=Radford, Ben &rft.date=2016&rft.coverage=northlimit=-34.142046; southlimit=-34.308192; westlimit=119.563189; eastLimit=119.773028&rft.coverage=northlimit=-34.142046; southlimit=-34.308192; westlimit=119.563189; eastLimit=119.773028&rft_rights=Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0&rft_subject=biota&rft_subject=BIOLOGICAL CLASSIFICATION&rft_subject=EARTH SCIENCE&rft_subject=ANIMALS/INVERTEBRATES&rft_subject=SEAGRASS&rft_subject=PLANTS&rft_subject=ANGIOSPERMS (FLOWERING PLANTS)&rft_subject=MONOCOTS&rft_subject=MACROALGAE (SEAWEEDS)&rft_subject=Environmental Sciences not elsewhere classified&rft_subject=ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES&rft_subject=OTHER ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES&rft_subject=Environmental Management&rft_subject=ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE AND MANAGEMENT&rft_subject=Marine and Estuarine Ecology (incl. Marine Ichthyology)&rft_subject=BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES&rft_subject=ECOLOGY&rft_subject=research vessel&rft_subject=Biotic formations&rft_subject=Biotic taxonomic identification&rft_subject=underwater cameras&rft.type=dataset&rft.language=English Access the data

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Open Licence view details
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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0

Access:

Open

Brief description

The Marine Futures Project was designed to benchmark the current status of key Western Australian marine ecosystems, based on an improved understanding of the relationship between marine habitats, biodiversity and our use of these values. Approximately 1,500 km2 of seafloor were mapped using hydroacoustics (Reson 8101 Multibeam), and expected benthic habitats "ground-truthed" using towed video transects and baited remote underwater video systems. Both sources of information were then combined in a spatial predictive modelling framework to produce fine-scale habitat maps showing the extent of substrate types, biotic formations, etc.

Surveys took place across 9 study areas, including Point Ann, a site which lies within the Fitzgerald Biosphere, a UNESCO designated International Biosphere Reserve and one of the largest and biologically significant National Parks in Australia (DEC) on West Australia’s south coast, approximately 180km east of Albany.

Lineage

Areas of seafloor in water deeper than 10 metres were surveyed with hydroacoustics using a Reson 8101 Multibeam or interferometric swath echosounder system, mounted on the hull of the sampling vessel. These data were processed to construct full coverage maps of seafloor bathymetry and textural information. These maps, combined with observations recorded from in situ video footage, unerpinned the development of statistical models that produced the most efficient, objective, and ecologically meaningful classifications of sea floor features and inhabitants as possible for natural resource management and planning.

Notes

Credit
Natural Heritage Trust

Created: 2016-05-21

Data time period: 2006-01-01 to 2008-12-31

This dataset is part of a larger collection

119.77303,-34.14205 119.77303,-34.30819 119.56319,-34.30819 119.56319,-34.14205 119.77303,-34.14205

119.6681085,-34.225119

Other Information
(DATA ACCESS - Point Ann biota (ap_bio_d.shp, ap_biota_g.shp) [direct download])

uri : https://data.imas.utas.edu.au/attachments/26c070dc-d529-4562-8054-bbc94de25e8e/MarineFutures-PointAnn-biota.zip

Identifiers
  • global : 26c070dc-d529-4562-8054-bbc94de25e8e