Dataset

Macquarie Island hourly radon data set 2013-2020

Australian Antarctic Data Centre
WILLIAMS, ALASTAIR GERAINT ; CHAMBERS, SCOTT
Viewed: [[ro.stat.viewed]] Cited: [[ro.stat.cited]] Accessed: [[ro.stat.accessed]]
ctx_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info%3Aofi%2Ffmt%3Akev%3Amtx%3Adc&rfr_id=info%3Asid%2FANDS&rft_id=info:doi10.26179/wbw9-ks66&rft.title=Macquarie Island hourly radon data set 2013-2020&rft.identifier=10.26179/wbw9-ks66&rft.publisher=Australian Antarctic Data Centre&rft.description=Atmospheric radon observations constitute a convenient and unambiguous indicator of recent terrestrial influence on air masses. Since most anthropogenic gaseous and aerosol pollutants are also of terrestrial origin, high-quality radon observations serve as a proxy for the ‘pollution potential’ of air masses in remote regions (e.g., Chambers et al. 2018; Williams and Chambers 2016). Radon-222 (radon) is a gaseous decay product of Uranium-238. Its immediate parent, Radium-226, is ubiquitous in soils and rocks. Radon is a noble gas, poorly soluble, and radioactive (t0.5=3.82 d), so it does not accumulate in the atmosphere on greater than synoptic timescales. Its average source function from unfrozen terrestrial surfaces is relatively well constrained, and 2-3 orders of magnitude greater than that from the open ocean. Furthermore, on regional scales radon’s terrestrial source function is not significantly affected by human activity. This combination of physical characteristics enables air masses that have been in contact with terrestrial surfaces to be tracked over the ocean, or within the troposphere, for 2-3 weeks. The radon concentration of air masses that have been in long-term equilibrium with the Southern Ocean is typically 30-50 mBq m-3 (e.g., Zahorowski et al. 2013). Consequently, key requirements of radon detectors deployed in such remote locations are: a detection limit of ≤50 mBq m-3, stable absolute calibrations, and low maintenance. Macquarie Island is small (34 x 5 km) and situated roughly midway between Australia and Antarctica. Radon and meteorological observations are made at the “Clean Air Laboratory” on an isthmus at the northern end of the island (~54.5 degrees S). At Macquarie Island, radon is measured with a 1500L, single head, dual flow loop, two-filter detector (Whittlestone and Zahorowski 1998). Sample air is drawn at ~45 L m-1 from an inlet ~5 m above ground level (a.g.l.) on a 10 m mast. The detector is automatically calibrated monthly using a 19.58±4% kBq 226Ra source injecting for 6 hours at a flow rate of ~170 cc min-1. Instrumental background checks are performed quarterly by automatically stopping the internal and external flow loop blowers for 24 hours.&rft.creator=WILLIAMS, ALASTAIR GERAINT &rft.creator=CHAMBERS, SCOTT &rft.date=2021&rft.coverage=northlimit=-54.47642; southlimit=-54.79118; westlimit=158.75793; eastLimit=158.97217; projection=WGS84&rft.coverage=northlimit=-54.47642; southlimit=-54.79118; westlimit=158.75793; eastLimit=158.97217; projection=WGS84&rft_rights=Publication / acknowledgement policy: • Acknowledgement should be made of ANSTO and the contact persons listed below in any publication, presentation or report which makes use of these data. • If a publication makes substantial use of these data, the appropriate ANSTO research staff member(s) would expect to be asked to be co-author(s). Contact persons: Dr Alastair Williams (Research Leader – Atmosphere, Environment Research Theme, ANSTO) Email: Alastair.Williams@ansto.gov.au; Phone: +61 2 9717 3694 Dr Scott Chambers (Atmospheric Physicist, Environment Research Theme, ANSTO) Email: Scott.Chambers@ansto.gov.au; Phone: +61 2 9717 3058 This data set conforms to the CCBY Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/). Please follow instructions listed in the citation reference provided at http://data.aad.gov.au/aadc/metadata/citation.cfm?entry_id=AAS_4167_MQ_2020_Radon when using these data.&rft_subject=climatologyMeteorologyAtmosphere&rft_subject=EMISSIONS&rft_subject=EARTH SCIENCE&rft_subject=ATMOSPHERE&rft_subject=AIR QUALITY&rft_subject=RADON&rft_subject=TWO-FILTER RADON DETECTOR&rft_subject=PARTICLE DETECTORS&rft_subject=FIXED OBSERVATION STATIONS&rft_subject=OCEAN > SOUTHERN OCEAN > MACQUARIE ISLAND&rft_subject=GEOGRAPHIC REGION > POLAR&rft_place=Hobart&rft.type=dataset&rft.language=English Access the data

Licence & Rights:

view details

Publication / acknowledgement policy: • Acknowledgement should be made of ANSTO and the contact persons listed below in any publication, presentation or report which makes use of these data. • If a publication makes substantial use of these data, the appropriate ANSTO research staff member(s) would expect to be asked to be co-author(s). Contact persons: Dr Alastair Williams (Research Leader – Atmosphere, Environment Research Theme, ANSTO) Email: Alastair.Williams@ansto.gov.au; Phone: +61 2 9717 3694 Dr Scott Chambers (Atmospheric Physicist, Environment Research Theme, ANSTO) Email: Scott.Chambers@ansto.gov.au; Phone: +61 2 9717 3058 This data set conforms to the CCBY Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/). Please follow instructions listed in the citation reference provided at http://data.aad.gov.au/aadc/metadata/citation.cfm?entry_id=AAS_4167_MQ_2020_Radon when using these data.

Access:

Open view details

These data are publicly available for download from the AADC, and can also be obtained from the following ANSTO contact persons: Dr Alastair Williams (Research Leader – Atmosphere, Environment Research Theme, ANSTO) Email: Alastair.Williams@ansto.gov.au; Phone: +61 2 9717 3694 Dr Scott Chambers (Atmospheric Physicist, Environment Research Theme, ANSTO) Email: Scott.Chambers@ansto.gov.au; Phone: +61 2 9717 3058

Brief description

Atmospheric radon observations constitute a convenient and unambiguous indicator of recent terrestrial influence on air masses. Since most anthropogenic gaseous and aerosol pollutants are also of terrestrial origin, high-quality radon observations serve as a proxy for the ‘pollution potential’ of air masses in remote regions (e.g., Chambers et al. 2018; Williams and Chambers 2016).

Radon-222 (radon) is a gaseous decay product of Uranium-238. Its immediate parent, Radium-226, is ubiquitous in soils and rocks. Radon is a noble gas, poorly soluble, and radioactive (t0.5=3.82 d), so it does not accumulate in the atmosphere on greater than synoptic timescales. Its average source function from unfrozen terrestrial surfaces is relatively well constrained, and 2-3 orders of magnitude greater than that from the open ocean. Furthermore, on regional scales radon’s terrestrial source function is not significantly affected by human activity. This combination of physical characteristics enables air masses that have been in contact with terrestrial surfaces to be tracked over the ocean, or within the troposphere, for 2-3 weeks.

The radon concentration of air masses that have been in long-term equilibrium with the Southern Ocean is typically 30-50 mBq m-3 (e.g., Zahorowski et al. 2013). Consequently, key requirements of radon detectors deployed in such remote locations are: a detection limit of ≤50 mBq m-3, stable absolute calibrations, and low maintenance. Macquarie Island is small (34 x 5 km) and situated roughly midway between Australia and Antarctica. Radon and meteorological observations are made at the “Clean Air Laboratory” on an isthmus at the northern end of the island (~54.5 degrees S). At Macquarie Island, radon is measured with a 1500L, single head, dual flow loop, two-filter detector (Whittlestone and Zahorowski 1998). Sample air is drawn at ~45 L m-1 from an inlet ~5 m above ground level (a.g.l.) on a 10 m mast. The detector is automatically calibrated monthly using a 19.58±4% kBq 226Ra source injecting for 6 hours at a flow rate of ~170 cc min-1. Instrumental background checks are performed quarterly by automatically stopping the internal and external flow loop blowers for 24 hours.

Issued: 2021-07-12

Data time period: 2013-01-01 to 2020-12-31

Click to explore relationships graph

158.97217,-54.47642 158.97217,-54.79118 158.75793,-54.79118 158.75793,-54.47642 158.97217,-54.47642

158.86505,-54.6338

text: northlimit=-54.47642; southlimit=-54.79118; westlimit=158.75793; eastLimit=158.97217; projection=WGS84

Subjects

User Contributed Tags    

Login to tag this record with meaningful keywords to make it easier to discover

Other Information
Identifiers