Data

Latitudinal trends in thermal traits in a clade of small reptilian ectotherms

James Cook University
Pintor, A ; Krockenberger, A ; Schwarzkopf, L
Viewed: [[ro.stat.viewed]] Cited: [[ro.stat.cited]] Accessed: [[ro.stat.accessed]]
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Non-Commercial Licence view details
CC-BY-NC-SA

CC BY-NC-SA: Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 AU
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/au

Access:

Conditions apply view details

Conditional: Contact researchdata@jcu.edu.au to request access to this data.

Brief description

This data set contains comprehensive information on latitudinal variation in several physiological and behavioural traits within and among thirteen species of lizards (rainbow skinks) from Eastern Australia. Traits included are metabolic rate, water loss rate, preferred body temperature, lower and upper temperature tolerance limits and endurance at different temperatures.

Full description

This is a comprehensive data set on intra- and interspecific latitudinal variation in thermal traits in a clade of small ectotherms from Eastern Australia (genera Carlia and Lygisaurus). It includes data on metabolic rate, water loss rate, preferred body temperature, thermoregulatory precision, critical thermal minimum and maximum temperatures and performance at different temperatures in individuals of 13 different species with different latitudinal range position and range extent. For wide ranging species, several populations from different latitudes are included. The data set also includes calibration data on the lag of body temperature behind air temperature in experiments on critical thermal limits and information on the phylogeny of the study species, based on a previously published phylogeny (Pyron et al. 2013, see data set for full reference). The data was collected at James Cook University, Cairns QLD, Australia, as part of a PhD project from 2012 to 2014. Animals were collected along the Australian East Coast from locations between Canberra and Lockhart River. Detailed methodologies can be found in the related PhD thesis and publication.

Created: 2015-07-06

This dataset is part of a larger collection

Click to explore relationships graph

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147.94628765434,-25.076789456314

Identifiers
  • Local : c7cce4e3dc57fbbceeae8d60b29867b3
  • Local : https://research.jcu.edu.au/data/published/a00262daa9e979305d4f83572defc119
  • DOI : 10.4225/28/55B59232DCAF4