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Internet addiction, psychological distress, and coping: Adult and adolescent populations

University of New England, Australia
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ctx_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info%3Aofi%2Ffmt%3Akev%3Amtx%3Adc&rfr_id=info%3Asid%2FANDS&rft_id=http://e-publications.une.edu.au/1959.11/22053&rft.title=Internet addiction, psychological distress, and coping: Adult and adolescent populations&rft.identifier=http://e-publications.une.edu.au/1959.11/22053&rft.publisher=University of New England, Australia&rft.description=This data set covers 449 participants aged from 16 to 71 years of age from a wide range of English speaking Internet forums including social media, and self-help groups. Of these participants, 68.9% were classified as non-problematic users, 24.4% as problematic users, and 6.7% as addictive Internet users. The results indicated that among adolescents the main contributing factors to Internet addiction (IA) were: high use of discussion forums, high rumination levels, and low levels of self-care. For adults, IA was mainly predicted by: engagement in online video gaming and sexual activity, low email use, as well as high anxiety and high avoidant coping. Furthermore, problematic adult Internet users scored higher on emotion and avoidance coping responses while problematic adolescent Internet users scored higher on rumination and lower on self-care. Avoidance coping responses mediated the relationship between psychological distress and Internet addiction.&rft.creator=Anonymous&rft.date=2017&rft.relation=http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/cyber.2016.0669&rft_rights=Data provided under CC-BY 4.0&rft_rights=CC BY: Attribution 3.0 AU http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/au&rft_subject=Internet Addiction&rft_subject=Self-care&rft_subject=Self care&rft_subject=Seeking Social Support&rft_subject=Social Support&rft_subject=Distraction&rft_subject=Stoicism&rft_subject=Avoidant Coping&rft_subject=Emotional Coping&rft_subject=Rational Coping&rft_subject=Detached Coping&rft_subject=Cyberpsychology&rft_subject=Adolescents&rft_subject=Coping Styles&rft_subject=Coping Strategies&rft_subject=Anxiety&rft_subject=Depression&rft_subject=Stress&rft_subject=Rumination&rft_subject=Acting Out&rft_subject=Health, Clinical and Counselling Psychology&rft_subject=PSYCHOLOGY AND COGNITIVE SCIENCES&rft_subject=PSYCHOLOGY&rft_subject=Behaviour and Health&rft_subject=HEALTH&rft_subject=PUBLIC HEALTH (EXCL. SPECIFIC POPULATION HEALTH)&rft_subject=Mental Health&rft_subject=Child Health&rft_subject=SPECIFIC POPULATION HEALTH (EXCL. INDIGENOUS HEALTH)&rft_subject=Pure basic research&rft.type=dataset&rft.language=English Access the data

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This data set covers 449 participants aged from 16 to 71 years of age from a wide range of English speaking Internet forums including social media, and self-help groups. Of these participants, 68.9% were classified as non-problematic users, 24.4% as problematic users, and 6.7% as addictive Internet users. The results indicated that among adolescents the main contributing factors to Internet addiction (IA) were: high use of discussion forums, high rumination levels, and low levels of self-care. For adults, IA was mainly predicted by: engagement in online video gaming and sexual activity, low email use, as well as high anxiety and high avoidant coping. Furthermore, problematic adult Internet users scored higher on emotion and avoidance coping responses while problematic adolescent Internet users scored higher on rumination and lower on self-care. Avoidance coping responses mediated the relationship between psychological distress and Internet addiction.

Data time period: 2016 to 2017

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