Dataset

Incentive Amounts-Prolific

University of Tasmania, Australia
Stuart Ferguson ; Rachel Breen ; Matthew Palmer
Viewed: [[ro.stat.viewed]] Cited: [[ro.stat.cited]] Accessed: [[ro.stat.accessed]]
ctx_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info%3Aofi%2Ffmt%3Akev%3Amtx%3Adc&rfr_id=info%3Asid%2FANDS&rft_id=https://data.utas.edu.au/metadata/da3965b1-2f7c-4179-8fc2-a6cc1ff5da82&rft.title=Incentive Amounts-Prolific&rft.identifier=https://data.utas.edu.au/metadata/da3965b1-2f7c-4179-8fc2-a6cc1ff5da82&rft.publisher=University of Tasmania, Australia&rft.description=Studies demonstrate that financial incentive programmes increase smoking cessation. However, there is little guidance on which incentive magnitudes will ensure optimal enrolment and motivation levels. This study investigates current smokers’ perceptions of varying incentive magnitudes to identify whether there is evidence for optimal amount(s), and whether perceptions differ by income group. Studies 1 (N = 56) and 2 (N = 147) were conducted online via Prolific.co. Current smokers were randomly shown multiple hypothetical incentive programmes which differed only in the incentive amount offered. For each programme, smokers rated its appeal, their likelihood of enrolling, and predicted their motivation to quit if enrolled.&rft.creator=Stuart Ferguson &rft.creator=Rachel Breen &rft.creator=Matthew Palmer &rft.date=2020&rft.coverage=east=-3.17436218261719; north=55.4621173584655; projection=WGS84&rft_rights=Attribution - NonCommercial - Share Alike(BY - NC - SA) http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/&rft_subject=520402&rft_subject=200412&rft_subject=smoking&rft_subject=cessation&rft_subject=incentive&rft_subject=behaviour change&rft_subject=financial incentives&rft.type=dataset&rft.language=English Access the data

Licence & Rights:

Non-Commercial Licence view details
CC-BY-NC-SA

Attribution - NonCommercial - Share Alike(BY - NC - SA)
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/

Access:

Open

Full description

Studies demonstrate that financial incentive programmes increase smoking cessation. However, there is little guidance on which incentive magnitudes will ensure optimal enrolment and motivation levels. This study investigates current smokers’ perceptions of varying incentive magnitudes to identify whether there is evidence for optimal amount(s), and whether perceptions differ by income group.

Studies 1 (N = 56) and 2 (N = 147) were conducted online via Prolific.co. Current smokers were randomly shown multiple hypothetical incentive programmes which differed only in the incentive amount offered. For each programme, smokers rated its appeal, their likelihood of enrolling, and predicted their motivation to quit if enrolled.

Data time period: 2019-09 to 2019-12

Click to explore relationships graph

-3.1743621826172,55.462117358465

-3.1743621826172,55.462117358465

dcmiPoint: east=-3.17436218261719; north=55.4621173584655; projection=WGS84

Subjects

User Contributed Tags    

Login to tag this record with meaningful keywords to make it easier to discover