Data

IMOS - SRS Satellite Altimetry Calibration and Validation Sub-Facility

Australian Ocean Data Network
Integrated Marine Observing System (IMOS)
Viewed: [[ro.stat.viewed]] Cited: [[ro.stat.cited]] Accessed: [[ro.stat.accessed]]
ctx_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info%3Aofi%2Ffmt%3Akev%3Amtx%3Adc&rfr_id=info%3Asid%2FANDS&rft_id=http://catalogue-aodn.prod.aodn.org.au/geonetwork/srv/eng/search?uuid=78d588ed-79dd-47e2-b806-d39025194e7e&rft.title=IMOS - SRS Satellite Altimetry Calibration and Validation Sub-Facility&rft.identifier=http://catalogue-aodn.prod.aodn.org.au/geonetwork/srv/eng/search?uuid=78d588ed-79dd-47e2-b806-d39025194e7e&rft.description=High precision satellite altimeter missions including TOPEX/Poseidon (T/P), Jason-1 and now OSTM/Jason-2, have contributed fundamental advances in our understanding of regional and global ocean circulation and its role in the Earth's climate and regional applications. These altimeter satellites essentially observe the height of the global oceans – as such, they have become the tool of choice for scientists to measure sea level rise – both at regional and global scales as well as giving information about ocean currents and large- and small-scale variability. The determination of changes in global mean sea level is of fundamental importance in understanding the response of the ocean to a continuing warming climate – both through thermal expansion of the ocean, melting of the major ice sheets of Greenland and Antarctica, and mountain glaciers, and redistribution of water over the continents and atmosphere. As with all scientific observations, it is vital that the measurement tool is operating within its specifications – calibration and validation is therefore an important component in this regard. This IMOS sub-facility provides the sole southern hemisphere in situ calibration site to provide an ongoing calibration and validation data stream directly to the international (NASA and CNES sponsored) Ocean Surface Topography Science Team (OSTST). This contribution, importantly, spans multiple altimeter missions, thus enabling the assimilation of multi-mission satellite data to determine ongoing changes in sea level with flow-on effects to other uses of this data. The OSTST collectively oversees the operation and calibration of the precision altimetry missions, and ensures each of these missions is performing as accurately as possible in order to meet mission objectives. The IMOS supported calibration site in Australia is one of four primary in situ calibration/validation sites that contribute to the OSTST. The remaining sites include Harvest (USA), Corsica (France), and Gavdos (Greece). The Australian calibration site includes two comparison points where in situ data is compared against the altimeter – Bass Strait and Storm Bay. These two locations both lie on descending (N -> S) pass 088 of the satellite altimeter, and thus share similar satellite orbit characteristics. The use of these two sites allows detailed investigation into the accuracy of the altimeter over two different wave climates. The average significant wave height at Storm Bay is approximately double that observed at the comparatively sheltered Bass Strait location. One of the ongoing issues with satellite altimeter missions is the “Sea-state bias” correction which is related to wave shape and height. We plan to use the different wave climates at the two locations, coupled with the fact that some other things (such as orbit errors) are the same at both locations to improve the quality of this correction.&rft.creator=Integrated Marine Observing System (IMOS) &rft.date=2011&rft_rights=Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0&rft_subject=oceans&rft_subject=CONDUCTIVITY&rft_subject=EARTH SCIENCE&rft_subject=OCEANS&rft_subject=SALINITY/DENSITY&rft_subject=WATER TEMPERATURE&rft_subject=OCEAN TEMPERATURE&rft_subject=WATER DEPTH&rft_subject=BATHYMETRY/SEAFLOOR TOPOGRAPHY&rft_subject=OCEAN CURRENTS&rft_subject=OCEAN CIRCULATION&rft_subject=SEA SURFACE HEIGHT&rft_subject=SEA SURFACE TOPOGRAPHY&rft_subject=SALINITY&rft_subject=WATER PRESSURE&rft_subject=OCEAN PRESSURE&rft_subject=Marine Features (Australia) | Storm Bay, TAS&rft_subject=Marine Features (Australia) | Bass Strait, TAS/VIC&rft_subject=Regional Seas | Tasman Sea&rft_subject=Countries | Australia&rft_subject=States, Territories (Australia) | Tasmania&rft_subject=subsurface mooring&rft_subject=Temperature of the water body&rft_subject=Practical salinity of the water body&rft_subject=Electrical conductivity of the water body&rft_subject=Eastward current velocity in the water body&rft_subject=Northward current velocity in the water body&rft_subject=Pressure (measured variable) in the water body exerted by overlying sea water and any medium above it&rft_subject=current meters&rft_subject=Conductivity-Temperature sensors&rft_subject=Satellite Altimetry Calibration and Validation Sub-Facility, Integrated Marine Observing System (IMOS)&rft.type=dataset&rft.language=English Access the data

Licence & Rights:

Open Licence view details
CC-BY

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0

Access:

Open

Brief description

High precision satellite altimeter missions including TOPEX/Poseidon (T/P), Jason-1 and now OSTM/Jason-2, have contributed fundamental advances in our understanding of regional and global ocean circulation and its role in the Earth's climate and regional applications. These altimeter satellites essentially observe the height of the global oceans – as such, they have become the tool of choice for scientists to measure sea level rise – both at regional and global scales as well as giving information about ocean currents and large- and small-scale variability. The determination of changes in global mean sea level is of fundamental importance in understanding the response of the ocean to a continuing warming climate – both through thermal expansion of the ocean, melting of the major ice sheets of Greenland and Antarctica, and mountain glaciers, and redistribution of water over the continents and atmosphere. As with all scientific observations, it is vital that the measurement tool is operating within its specifications – calibration and validation is therefore an important component in this regard. This IMOS sub-facility provides the sole southern hemisphere in situ calibration site to provide an ongoing calibration and validation data stream directly to the international (NASA and CNES sponsored) Ocean Surface Topography Science Team (OSTST). This contribution, importantly, spans multiple altimeter missions, thus enabling the assimilation of multi-mission satellite data to determine ongoing changes in sea level with flow-on effects to other uses of this data. The OSTST collectively oversees the operation and calibration of the precision altimetry missions, and ensures each of these missions is performing as accurately as possible in order to meet mission objectives. The IMOS supported calibration site in Australia is one of four primary in situ calibration/validation sites that contribute to the OSTST. The remaining sites include Harvest (USA), Corsica (France), and Gavdos (Greece). The Australian calibration site includes two comparison points where in situ data is compared against the altimeter – Bass Strait and Storm Bay. These two locations both lie on descending (N -> S) pass 088 of the satellite altimeter, and thus share similar satellite orbit characteristics. The use of these two sites allows detailed investigation into the accuracy of the altimeter over two different wave climates. The average significant wave height at Storm Bay is approximately double that observed at the comparatively sheltered Bass Strait location. One of the ongoing issues with satellite altimeter missions is the “Sea-state bias” correction which is related to wave shape and height. We plan to use the different wave climates at the two locations, coupled with the fact that some other things (such as orbit errors) are the same at both locations to improve the quality of this correction.

Notes

Credit
Australia’s Integrated Marine Observing System (IMOS) is enabled by the National Collaborative Research Infrastructure Strategy (NCRIS). It is operated by a consortium of institutions as an unincorporated joint venture, with the University of Tasmania as Lead Agent.
Credit
University of Tasmania (UTAS)
Credit
CSIRO Oceans and Atmosphere
Credit
Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS)
Credit
National Centre for Space Studies (CNES)
Credit
National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)

Created: 14 06 2011

Data time period: 2008

This dataset is part of a larger collection

Other Information
(Website of the IMOS Satellite Altimetry Calibration and Validation sub-facility)

uri : http://imos.org.au/srscalval.html

(OGC WFS help documentation)

uri : https://help.aodn.org.au/web-services/ogc-wfs/

(ncUrlList help documentation)

uri : https://help.aodn.org.au/web-services/ncurllist-service/

Identifiers
  • global : 78d588ed-79dd-47e2-b806-d39025194e7e