Data

IMOS - Australian National Facility for Ocean Gliders (ANFOG) - Real-time glider deployments

Australian Ocean Data Network
Integrated Marine Observing System (IMOS)
Viewed: [[ro.stat.viewed]] Cited: [[ro.stat.cited]] Accessed: [[ro.stat.accessed]]
ctx_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info%3Aofi%2Ffmt%3Akev%3Amtx%3Adc&rfr_id=info%3Asid%2FANDS&rft_id=http://catalogue-aodn.prod.aodn.org.au/geonetwork/srv/eng/search?uuid=a681fdba-c6d9-44ab-90b9-113b0ed03536&rft.title=IMOS - Australian National Facility for Ocean Gliders (ANFOG) - Real-time glider deployments&rft.identifier=http://catalogue-aodn.prod.aodn.org.au/geonetwork/srv/eng/search?uuid=a681fdba-c6d9-44ab-90b9-113b0ed03536&rft.description=The Australian National Facility for Ocean Gliders (ANFOG), with IMOS/NCRIS funding, deploys a fleet of eight gliders around Australia. The data represented by this record, are presented in real-time. The underwater ocean glider represents a technological revolution for oceanography. Autonomous ocean gliders can be built relatively cheaply, are controlled remotely and are reusable allowing them to make repeated subsurface ocean observations at a fraction of the cost of conventional methods. The data retrieved from the glider fleet will contribute to the study of the major boundary current systems surrounding Australia and their links to coastal ecosystems. The ANFOG glider fleet consists of two types; Slocum gliders and Seagliders. Slocum gliders (named for Joshua Slocum, the first solo global circumnavigator), manufactured by Webb Research Corp are optimised for shallow coastal waters (&rft.creator=Integrated Marine Observing System (IMOS) &rft.date=2014&rft.coverage=146,-19 146,-17 147,-17 147,-19&rft.coverage=115,-32 115,-31 116,-31 116,-32&rft.coverage=151,-35 151,-32 153,-32 153,-34 152,-34 152,-35&rft.coverage=140,-39 140,-37 141,-37 141,-38 142,-38 142,-39&rft.coverage=146,-42 146,-39 147,-39 147,-42&rft_rights=Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0&rft_subject=oceans&rft_subject=CONDUCTIVITY&rft_subject=EARTH SCIENCE&rft_subject=OCEANS&rft_subject=SALINITY/DENSITY&rft_subject=WATER TEMPERATURE&rft_subject=OCEAN TEMPERATURE&rft_subject=WATER DEPTH&rft_subject=BATHYMETRY/SEAFLOOR TOPOGRAPHY&rft_subject=FLUORESCENCE&rft_subject=OCEAN OPTICS&rft_subject=OXYGEN&rft_subject=OCEAN CHEMISTRY&rft_subject=TURBIDITY&rft_subject=OCEAN CURRENTS&rft_subject=OCEAN CIRCULATION&rft_subject=CHLOROPHYLL&rft_subject=SALINITY&rft_subject=ORGANIC MATTER&rft_subject=Fluorometers&rft_subject=CTD (Conductivity-Temperature-Depth Profilers)&rft_subject=IMOS Node | Bluewater and Climate&rft_subject=IMOS Node | WAIMOS | Western Australia Integrated Marine Observing System&rft_subject=IMOS Node | NSW-IMOS | New South Wales Integrated Marine Observing System&rft_subject=IMOS Node | SA-IMOS | Southern Australian Integrated Marine Observing System&rft_subject=Marine Features (Australia) | Leeuwin Current&rft_subject=Marine Features (Australia) | East Australian Current&rft_subject=Physical Oceanography&rft_subject=Global / Oceans | Indian Ocean&rft_subject=Marine Features (Australia) | Great Australian Bight, SA/WA&rft_subject=Global / Oceans | Southern Ocean&rft_subject=Global / Oceans | Pacific Ocean&rft_subject=Regional Seas | Coral Sea&rft_subject=Regional Seas | Tasman Sea&rft_subject=Countries | Australia&rft_subject=States, Territories (Australia) | Western Australia&rft_subject=States, Territories (Australia) | South Australia&rft_subject=States, Territories (Australia) | Tasmania&rft_subject=States, Territories (Australia) | New South Wales&rft_subject=States, Territories (Australia) | Queensland&rft_subject=sub-surface gliders&rft_subject=Pressure (measured variable) in the water body exerted by overlying sea water and any medium above it&rft_subject=Concentration of inferred chlorophyll from relative fluorescence per unit volume of the water body&rft_subject=Temperature of the water body&rft_subject=Practical salinity of the water body&rft_subject=Concentration of oxygen {O2} per unit volume of the water body&rft_subject=Electrical conductivity of the water body&rft_subject=Northward current velocity in the water body&rft_subject=Eastward current velocity in the water body&rft_subject=Colored Dissolved Organic Matter&rft_subject=CTD&rft_subject=dissolved gas sensors&rft_subject=water biogeochemical sensor&rft_subject=Ocean Gliders Facility, Integrated Marine Observing System (IMOS)&rft.type=dataset&rft.language=English Access the data

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Open Licence view details
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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0

Access:

Open

Brief description

The Australian National Facility for Ocean Gliders (ANFOG), with IMOS/NCRIS funding, deploys a fleet of eight gliders around Australia. The data represented by this record, are presented in real-time. The underwater ocean glider represents a technological revolution for oceanography. Autonomous ocean gliders can be built relatively cheaply, are controlled remotely and are reusable allowing them to make repeated subsurface ocean observations at a fraction of the cost of conventional methods. The data retrieved from the glider fleet will contribute to the study of the major boundary current systems surrounding Australia and their links to coastal ecosystems. The ANFOG glider fleet consists of two types; Slocum gliders and Seagliders. Slocum gliders (named for Joshua Slocum, the first solo global circumnavigator), manufactured by Webb Research Corp are optimised for shallow coastal waters (<200m) where high manoeuvrability is needed. ANFOG will have three Slocum gliders for deployment on the continental shelf. Seagliders, built at the University of Washington, are designed to operate more efficiently in the open ocean up to 1000m water depth. ANFOG uses their five Seagliders to monitor the boundary currents and continental shelves, which is valuable for gathering long-term environmental records of physical, chemical and biological data not widely measured to date. Whilst the Slocum gliders, due to their low cost and operational flexibility, will be of great use in intensive coastal monitoring, both types of gliders weigh only 52kg, enabling them to be launched from small boats. They have a suite of sensors able to record temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen, turbidity, dissolved organic matter and chlorophyll against position and depth Sustained ocean observations will allow researchers to document the natural variability of the ocean, and better understand the effect of climate change on coastal ecosystems. The IMOS gliders will focus particularly on the major boundary currents that run down the Australian coast, the Leeuwin in the west and the East Australian Current (EAC). The study of these currents is critical for understanding the north-south transport of freshwater, heat and biogeochemical properties. The currents exert a large influence on coastal ecosystems, shipping lanes and fisheries.

Notes

Credit
Australia's Integrated Marine Observing System (IMOS) is enabled by the National Collaborative Research Infrastructure Strategy (NCRIS). It is operated by a consortium of institutions as an unincorporated joint venture, with the University of Tasmania as Lead Agent.
Credit
The University of Western Australia (UWA)

Issued: 08 01 2014

Data time period: 2010-08-01

This dataset is part of a larger collection

146,-19 146,-17 147,-17 147,-19

146.5,-18

115,-32 115,-31 116,-31 116,-32

115.5,-31.5

151,-34 151,-32 153,-32 153,-34

152,-33

140,-39 140,-37 141,-37 141,-38 142,-38 142,-39

141,-38

146,-42 146,-39 147,-39 147,-42

146.5,-40.5

Subjects
BATHYMETRY/SEAFLOOR TOPOGRAPHY | Chlorophyll | Conductivity | CTD | CTD (Conductivity-Temperature-Depth Profilers) | Colored Dissolved Organic Matter | Concentration of inferred chlorophyll from relative fluorescence per unit volume of the water body | Concentration of oxygen {O2} per unit volume of the water body | Countries | Australia | EARTH SCIENCE | Eastward current velocity in the water body | Electrical conductivity of the water body | Fluorescence | Fluorometers | Global / Oceans | Indian Ocean | Global / Oceans | Pacific Ocean | Global / Oceans | Southern Ocean | IMOS Node | Bluewater and Climate | IMOS Node | NSW-IMOS | New South Wales Integrated Marine Observing System | IMOS Node | SA-IMOS | Southern Australian Integrated Marine Observing System | IMOS Node | WAIMOS | Western Australia Integrated Marine Observing System | Marine Features (Australia) | East Australian Current | Marine Features (Australia) | Great Australian Bight, SA/WA | Marine Features (Australia) | Leeuwin Current | Northward current velocity in the water body | OCEAN CHEMISTRY | OCEAN CIRCULATION | Ocean Currents | OCEAN OPTICS | OCEAN TEMPERATURE | OCEANS | Organic Matter | Oxygen | Ocean Gliders Facility, Integrated Marine Observing System (IMOS) | Physical Oceanography | Practical salinity of the water body | Pressure (measured variable) in the water body exerted by overlying sea water and any medium above it | Regional Seas | Coral Sea | Regional Seas | Tasman Sea | Salinity | SALINITY/DENSITY | States, Territories (Australia) | New South Wales | States, Territories (Australia) | Queensland | States, Territories (Australia) | South Australia | States, Territories (Australia) | Tasmania | States, Territories (Australia) | Western Australia | Turbidity | Temperature of the water body | Water Depth | Water Temperature | dissolved gas sensors | oceans | sub-surface gliders | water biogeochemical sensor |

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  • global : a681fdba-c6d9-44ab-90b9-113b0ed03536