Data

Data from ''Human exploitation shapes productivity-biomass relationships on coral reefs"

James Cook University
Bellwood, D ; Morais, R
Viewed: [[ro.stat.viewed]] Cited: [[ro.stat.cited]] Accessed: [[ro.stat.accessed]]
ctx_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info%3Aofi%2Ffmt%3Akev%3Amtx%3Adc&rfr_id=info%3Asid%2FANDS&rft_id=info:doi10.25903/5dde18faf37e3&rft.title=Data from ''Human exploitation shapes productivity-biomass relationships on coral reefs&rft.identifier=10.25903/5dde18faf37e3&rft.publisher=James Cook University&rft.description=This entry refers to Morais, Connolly and Bellwood 'Human exploitation shapes productivity-biomass relationships on coral reefs' in the journal Global Change Biology. It encompasses R scripts and multiple data tables used to reproduce the analyses of the paper.The compressed file in this data entry encompasses three folders: '1st Inputs' is where the input data tables are located, '2nd Scripts' is where the scripts with functions, routines and procedures are located; and '3rd Outputs' is the folder to which figures and tables will be exported once the analyses are replicated.Abstract [Related Publication]: Coral reef fisheries support the livelihoods of millions of people in tropical countries, despite large‐scale depletion of fish biomass. While human adaptability can help to explain the resistance of fisheries to biomass depletion, compensatory ecological mechanisms may also be involved. If this is the case, high productivity should coexist with low biomass under relatively high exploitation. Here we integrate large spatial scale empirical data analysis and a theory‐driven modelling approach to unveil the effects of human exploitation on reef fish productivity–biomass relationships. We show that differences in how productivity and biomass respond to overexploitation can decouple their relationship. As size‐selective exploitation depletes fish biomass, it triggers increased production per unit biomass, averting immediate productivity collapse in both the modelling and the empirical systems. This ‘buffering productivity’ exposes the danger of assuming resource production–biomass equivalence, but may help to explain why some biomass‐depleted fish assemblages still provide ecosystem goods under continued global fishing exploitation. &rft.creator=Bellwood, D &rft.creator=Morais, R &rft.date=2019&rft.relation=https://doi.org/10.1111/gcb.14941&rft.coverage=166.3420115014,-20.428556796543 166.3420115014,-12.963341452607 172.1867380639,-12.963341452607 172.1867380639,-20.428556796543 166.3420115014,-20.428556796543&rft.coverage=-173.09815975883,-14.812747118874 -173.09815975883,-13.192508294177 -167.89064022758,-13.192508294177 -167.89064022758,-14.812747118874 -173.09815975883,-14.812747118874&rft.coverage=-150.14660023098,-18.105727258659 -150.14660023098,-17.252638381106 -148.8831724966,-17.252638381106 -148.8831724966,-18.105727258659 -150.14660023098,-18.105727258659&rft.coverage=56.716286363092,-20.918449419851 56.716286363092,-19.257325885271 63.835426988092,-19.257325885271 63.835426988092,-20.918449419851 56.716286363092,-20.918449419851&rft.coverage=96.777649861767,-12.236470198171 96.777649861767,-12.05388300126 96.964417439895,-12.05388300126 96.964417439895,-12.236470198171 96.777649861767,-12.236470198171&rft.coverage=118.53667893447,-17.886745744741 118.53667893447,-16.969584120461 119.72320237197,-16.969584120461 119.72320237197,-17.886745744741 118.53667893447,-17.886745744741&rft.coverage=121.37672580779,-0.90135703415094 121.37672580779,2.0644675215361 125.59547580779,2.0644675215361 125.59547580779,-0.90135703415094 121.37672580779,-0.90135703415094&rft.coverage=129.24293674529,-4.2832474192346 129.24293674529,0.063343380987497 132.80250705779,0.063343380987497 132.80250705779,-4.2832474192346 129.24293674529,-4.2832474192346&rft.coverage=149.56764377654,-3.8668233334397 149.56764377654,-1.9357999339901 152.38014377654,-1.9357999339901 152.38014377654,-3.8668233334397 149.56764377654,-3.8668233334397&rft.coverage=145.01332612709,-15.334569750252 145.01332612709,-13.995423220812 146.33168550208,-13.995423220812 146.33168550208,-15.334569750252 145.01332612709,-15.334569750252&rft.coverage=156.76774907609,4.4693082086957 156.76774907609,7.7895833382113 163.75505376359,7.7895833382113 163.75505376359,4.4693082086957 156.76774907609,4.4693082086957&rft.coverage=&rft_rights=&rft_rights=CC BY-NC 4.0: Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 International http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0&rft_subject=ecosystem functioning&rft_subject=overexploitation&rft_subject=reef fish productivity&rft_subject=size-spectrum theory&rft_subject=coral reef fisheries&rft_subject=parrotfishes&rft_subject=Coral Triangle&rft_subject=Great Barrier Reef&rft_subject=ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies&rft_subject=Community Ecology&rft_subject=BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES&rft_subject=ECOLOGY&rft_subject=Aquatic Ecosystem Studies and Stock Assessment&rft_subject=AGRICULTURAL AND VETERINARY SCIENCES&rft_subject=FISHERIES SCIENCES&rft_subject=Marine and Estuarine Ecology (incl. Marine Ichthyology)&rft_subject=Fisheries Management&rft_subject=Fisheries - Wild Caught not elsewhere classified&rft_subject=ANIMAL PRODUCTION AND ANIMAL PRIMARY PRODUCTS&rft_subject=FISHERIES - WILD CAUGHT&rft.type=dataset&rft.language=English Access the data

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CC-BY-NC

CC BY-NC 4.0: Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 International
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0

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Open: free access under license

Full description

This entry refers to Morais, Connolly and Bellwood 'Human exploitation shapes productivity-biomass relationships on coral reefs' in the journal Global Change Biology. It encompasses R scripts and multiple data tables used to reproduce the analyses of the paper.

The compressed file in this data entry encompasses three folders: '1st Inputs' is where the input data tables are located, '2nd Scripts' is where the scripts with functions, routines and procedures are located; and '3rd Outputs' is the folder to which figures and tables will be exported once the analyses are replicated.

Abstract [Related Publication]: Coral reef fisheries support the livelihoods of millions of people in tropical countries, despite large‐scale depletion of fish biomass. While human adaptability can help to explain the resistance of fisheries to biomass depletion, compensatory ecological mechanisms may also be involved. If this is the case, high productivity should coexist with low biomass under relatively high exploitation. Here we integrate large spatial scale empirical data analysis and a theory‐driven modelling approach to unveil the effects of human exploitation on reef fish productivity–biomass relationships. We show that differences in how productivity and biomass respond to overexploitation can decouple their relationship. As size‐selective exploitation depletes fish biomass, it triggers increased production per unit biomass, averting immediate productivity collapse in both the modelling and the empirical systems. This ‘buffering productivity’ exposes the danger of assuming resource production–biomass equivalence, but may help to explain why some biomass‐depleted fish assemblages still provide ecosystem goods under continued global fishing exploitation.

 

Created: 2019-11-29

This dataset is part of a larger collection

Click to explore relationships graph

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Identifiers
  • Local : 686edcc9516cacd7d1cc9df43d0159be
  • Local : https://research.jcu.edu.au/data/published/22096db1cdcc1a005293313866106380
  • DOI : 10.25903/5dde18faf37e3