Dataset

Happy Feet - research into baby footprints as an infant biometric

RMIT University, Australia
Dr Stephen Davis (Associated with, Aggregated by) Jodie McVernon (Aggregated by)
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ctx_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info%3Aofi%2Ffmt%3Akev%3Amtx%3Adc&rfr_id=info%3Asid%2FANDS&rft_id=https://rmit.figshare.com/articles/Happy_Feet_-_research_into_baby_footprints_as_an_infant_biometric/12325436&rft.title=Happy Feet - research into baby footprints as an infant biometric&rft.identifier=https://redbox.rmit.edu.au/redbox/published/detail/5824539a990d0a8bdb70ff4686117e80&rft.publisher=RMIT University, Australia&rft.description=The pressing infant biometric problem is to find a biometric means to identify infants cheaply, reliably, and automatically. Physical traits of infants are tiny, delicate, and grow rapidly. The authors focus on a novel area of friction-ridge skin as a potential answer: the ball under the big toe. The ballprint is readily accessible, with more features and larger ridges than a fingerprint. The authors followed 54 newborns for 2 years, capturing their ballprints with an adult fingerprint scanner within 3 days of birth, at 2 months, at 6 months, and at 2 years. The authors show the growth of the ballprint is isotropic rather than affine during infancy. The isotropic growth rate from birth can be measured by the change in inter-ridge spacing, which the authors show precisely mirrors change in physical length from birth, as recorded by World Health Organisation for large, diverse infant populations. From 2 months of age, by using isotropic scaling to compensate for growth, the authors successfully matched good quality images with 0% equal error rate using existing adult fingerprint technology, even for captures 22 months apart. These findings flag the value of ballprints as a practical means of infant identification, by themselves, or together or sequentially with other biometrics.&rft.creator=Dr Stephen Davis&rft.creator=Jodie McVernon&rft.date=2020&rft.relation=http://dx.doi.org/10.1049/iet-bmt.2017.0282&rft.relation=https://researchbank.rmit.edu.au/view/rmit:161700&rft.relation=https://researchbank.rmit.edu.au/view/rmit:23750&rft.relation=https://researchbank.rmit.edu.au/view/rmit:29043&rft.relation=https://researchbank.rmit.edu.au/view/rmit:50563&rft.relation=http://researchbank.rmit.edu.au/view/rmit:50563&rft_rights=All Rights Reserved&rft_rights=CC BY-NC-SA: Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 AU http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/au&rft_subject=Biometrics (access control)&rft_subject=Fingerprint identification&rft_subject=Image matching&rft_subject=Image recognition&rft_subject=Paediatrics&rft_subject=Skin&rft_subject=Paediatrics and Reproductive Medicine not elsewhere classified&rft_subject=MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES&rft_subject=PAEDIATRICS AND REPRODUCTIVE MEDICINE&rft_subject=Biological Mathematics&rft_subject=MATHEMATICAL SCIENCES&rft_subject=APPLIED MATHEMATICS&rft_subject=Health not elsewhere classified&rft_subject=HEALTH&rft_subject=OTHER HEALTH&rft_subject=Health and Support Services not elsewhere classified&rft_subject=HEALTH AND SUPPORT SERVICES&rft_subject=Applied research&rft.type=dataset&rft.language=English Access the data

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RMIT University

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The pressing infant biometric problem is to find a biometric means to identify infants cheaply, reliably, and automatically. Physical traits of infants are tiny, delicate, and grow rapidly. The authors focus on a novel area of friction-ridge skin as a potential answer: the ball under the big toe. The ballprint is readily accessible, with more features and larger ridges than a fingerprint. The authors followed 54 newborns for 2 years, capturing their ballprints with an adult fingerprint scanner within 3 days of birth, at 2 months, at 6 months, and at 2 years. The authors show the growth of the ballprint is isotropic rather than affine during infancy. The isotropic growth rate from birth can be measured by the change in inter-ridge spacing, which the authors show precisely mirrors change in physical length from birth, as recorded by World Health Organisation for large, diverse infant populations. From 2 months of age, by using isotropic scaling to compensate for growth, the authors successfully matched good quality images with 0% equal error rate using existing adult fingerprint technology, even for captures 22 months apart. These findings flag the value of ballprints as a practical means of infant identification, by themselves, or together or sequentially with other biometrics.

Data time period: 2013 to 2014

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Identifiers
  • Local : https://redbox.rmit.edu.au/redbox/published/detail/5824539a990d0a8bdb70ff4686117e80