Dataset

Data from: The role of marine reserves in the replenishment of a locally-impacted population of anemonefish on the Great Barrier Reef

James Cook University
Ashley John Frisch (Aggregated by) David Williamson (Aggregated by) Geoffrey Paul Jones (Aggregated by) Hugo Harrison (Aggregated by) Mary Bonin (Associated with, Aggregated by)
Viewed: [[ro.stat.viewed]] Cited: [[ro.stat.cited]] Accessed: [[ro.stat.accessed]]
ctx_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info%3Aofi%2Ffmt%3Akev%3Amtx%3Adc&rfr_id=info%3Asid%2FANDS&rft_id=https://research.jcu.edu.au/researchdata/published/detail/3c1155b03a425d464ffdd0eb14153b54&rft.title=Data from: The role of marine reserves in the replenishment of a locally-impacted population of anemonefish on the Great Barrier Reef&rft.identifier=3c1155b03a425d464ffdd0eb14153b54&rft.publisher=James Cook University&rft.description=Dryad data package consists of 5 files:(1) Genotypes across 22 microsatellite markers for A.melanopus collected in the Keppel Islands(2) Parentage assignment data used to create Figure 2 dispersal map(3) Frequency data used to create Figure 3(4) Assignment data (colony level dispersal) used to create Figure 4(5) Dispersal distance and frequency data used to create Figure 5Abstract [Related Publication]: The development of parentage analysis to track the dispersal of juvenile offspring has given us unprecedented insight into the population dynamics of coral reef fishes. These tools now have the potential to inform fisheries management and species conservation, particularly for small fragmented populations under threat from exploitation and disturbance. In this study, we resolve patterns of larval dispersal for a population of the anemonefish Amphiprion melanopus in the Keppel Islands (southern Great Barrier Reef). Habitat loss and fishing appear to have impacted this population and a network of no-take marine reserves currently protects 75% of the potential breeders. Using parentage analysis, we estimate that 21% of recruitment in the island group was generated locally and that breeding adults living in reserves were responsible for 79% (31 of 39) of these of locally produced juveniles. Overall, the network of reserves was fully connected via larval dispersal; however, one reserve was identified as a critical source of larvae for the island group. The population in the Keppel Islands also appears to be well-connected to other source populations at least 60 km away, given that 79% (145 of 184) of the juveniles sampled remained unassigned in the parentage analysis. We estimated the effective size of the A. melanopus metapopulation to be 745 (582–993 95% CI) and recommend continued monitoring of its genetic status. Maintaining connectivity with populations beyond the Keppel Islands and recovery of local recruitment habitat, potentially through active restoration of host anemone populations, will be important for its long-term persistence.The full methodology is available in the publication shown in the Related Publications link below.&rft.creator=Ashley John Frisch&rft.creator=David Williamson&rft.creator=Geoffrey Paul Jones&rft.creator=Hugo Harrison&rft.creator=Mary Bonin&rft.date=2017&rft.relation=http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/mec.13484&rft.coverage=Keppel Islands, Great Barrier Reef, Queensland, Australia&rft.coverage=151.06931327932,-23.079838006528 151.04407908732,-23.049494647339 151.00988867396,-23.027806671446 150.9700888351,-23.016901594252 150.92857545629,-23.017849538302 150.88941215628,-23.030557471339 150.85643251175,-23.053778404544 150.83286480007,-23.085234615947 150.82101599309,-23.121842398037 150.82204593457,-23.16001565086 150.83585380668,-23.19601793987 150.86108799868,-23.226328162042 150.89527841205,-23.247984053134 150.9350782509,-23.258870353027 150.97659162971,-23.25792411144 151.01575492972,-23.24523771035 151.04873457426,-23.222049914133 151.07230228593,-23.19062578757 151.08415109292,-23.154036782835 151.08312115143,-23.115861827544 151.06931327932,-23.079838006528&rft_rights=CC 0: Public Domain Dedication 1.0 Universal http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0&rft_subject=larval connectivity&rft_subject=marine reserves&rft_subject=parentage analysis&rft_subject=effective population size&rft_subject=Amphiprion melanopus&rft_subject=ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies&rft_subject=Landscape Ecology&rft_subject=ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES&rft_subject=ECOLOGICAL APPLICATIONS&rft_subject=Population, Ecological and Evolutionary Genetics&rft_subject=BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES&rft_subject=GENETICS&rft_subject=Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences&rft_subject=EXPANDING KNOWLEDGE&rft_subject=EXPANDING KNOWLEDGE&rft.type=dataset&rft.language=English Access the data

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CC 0: Public Domain Dedication 1.0 Universal
http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0

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Open access. If the data is not freely accessible via the link provided, please contact the nominated data manager or researchdata@jcu.edu.au for assistance.

Contact Information

mary.bonin@jcu.edu.au

Full description

Dryad data package consists of 5 files:

(1) Genotypes across 22 microsatellite markers for A.melanopus collected in the Keppel Islands

(2) Parentage assignment data used to create Figure 2 dispersal map

(3) Frequency data used to create Figure 3

(4) Assignment data (colony level dispersal) used to create Figure 4

(5) Dispersal distance and frequency data used to create Figure 5

Abstract [Related Publication]: The development of parentage analysis to track the dispersal of juvenile offspring has given us unprecedented insight into the population dynamics of coral reef fishes. These tools now have the potential to inform fisheries management and species conservation, particularly for small fragmented populations under threat from exploitation and disturbance. In this study, we resolve patterns of larval dispersal for a population of the anemonefish Amphiprion melanopus in the Keppel Islands (southern Great Barrier Reef). Habitat loss and fishing appear to have impacted this population and a network of no-take marine reserves currently protects 75% of the potential breeders. Using parentage analysis, we estimate that 21% of recruitment in the island group was generated locally and that breeding adults living in reserves were responsible for 79% (31 of 39) of these of locally produced juveniles. Overall, the network of reserves was fully connected via larval dispersal; however, one reserve was identified as a critical source of larvae for the island group. The population in the Keppel Islands also appears to be well-connected to other source populations at least 60 km away, given that 79% (145 of 184) of the juveniles sampled remained unassigned in the parentage analysis. We estimated the effective size of the A. melanopus metapopulation to be 745 (582–993 95% CI) and recommend continued monitoring of its genetic status. Maintaining connectivity with populations beyond the Keppel Islands and recovery of local recruitment habitat, potentially through active restoration of host anemone populations, will be important for its long-term persistence.

The full methodology is available in the publication shown in the Related Publications link below.

Notes

This dataset is available from Dryad in MS Excel (.xlsx) format. Dryad data package: Bonin MC, Harrison HB, Williamson DH, Frisch AJ, Saenz-Agudelo P, Berumen ML, Jones GP (2015) Data from: The role of marine reserves in the replenishment of a locally-impacted population of anemonefish on the Great Barrier Reef. Dryad Digital Repository. https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.dj050

Created: 06 11 2017

Click to explore relationships graph

151.06931327932,-23.079838006528 151.04407908732,-23.049494647339 151.00988867396,-23.027806671446 150.9700888351,-23.016901594252 150.92857545629,-23.017849538302 150.88941215628,-23.030557471339 150.85643251175,-23.053778404544 150.83286480007,-23.085234615947 150.82101599309,-23.121842398037 150.82204593457,-23.16001565086 150.83585380668,-23.19601793987 150.86108799868,-23.226328162042 150.89527841205,-23.247984053134 150.9350782509,-23.258870353027 150.97659162971,-23.25792411144 151.01575492972,-23.24523771035 151.04873457426,-23.222049914133 151.07230228593,-23.19062578757 151.08415109292,-23.154036782835 151.08312115143,-23.115861827544 151.06931327932,-23.079838006528

150.95258354301,-23.137885973639

text: Keppel Islands, Great Barrier Reef, Queensland, Australia

Identifiers
  • Local : 3c1155b03a425d464ffdd0eb14153b54