Dataset

Farmers, voluntary stewardship programs, and collaborative natural resource governance in rural Australia

University of New England, Australia
Lawson, Andrew ; Martin, Paul ; Williams, Jacqueline ; Monk, Andrew
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ctx_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info%3Aofi%2Ffmt%3Akev%3Amtx%3Adc&rfr_id=info%3Asid%2FANDS&rft_id=info:doi10.4226/95/5a0cd390a7a4c&rft.title=Farmers, voluntary stewardship programs, and collaborative natural resource governance in rural Australia&rft.identifier=10.4226/95/5a0cd390a7a4c&rft.publisher=University of New England, Australia&rft.description=Qualitative, semi-structured interviews and surveys of Australian 23 farmers involved in voluntary stewardship programs. Qualitative, semi-structured interviews of 7 non-farmer stakeholders (animal welfare and environmental NGOs, Regional NRM body, government, researchers). Despite large financial investments by governments and farmers, as well as significant inputs of time, effort and goodwill, the ecological, social and productive capacity of the Australian rural environment is under threat. The nature of environmental problems, the limited capacity of rural communities and government constraints pose immense challenges of governance. Traditional governance measures (i.e. those centred on public laws) and purely private and self-regulatory forms seem unable to meet these challenges. This has spurred interest in collaborative modes, with the hope of combining the best of both the public and private spheres. Collaborative experiments are already underway in rural Australia, but there is a need for more empirical examination of how such arrangements work in practice. The great hopes attached to the success of collaborative governance are mostly theoretical or based on applications that may not be relevant to rural natural resources in Australia. Despite large financial investments by governments and farmers, as well as significant inputs of time, effort and goodwill, the ecological, social and productive capacity of the Australian rural environment is under threat. The nature of environmental problems, the limited capacity of rural communities and government constraints pose immense challenges of governance. Traditional governance measures (i.e. those centred on public laws) and purely private and self-regulatory forms seem unable to meet these challenges. This has spurred interest in collaborative modes, with the hope of combining the best of both the public and private spheres. Collaborative experiments are already underway in rural Australia, but there is a need for more empirical examination of how such arrangements work in practice. The great hopes attached to the success of collaborative governance are mostly theoretical or based on applications that may not be relevant to rural natural resources in Australia.This dataset relates to the following thesis. Farmers, voluntary stewardship programs, and collaborative natural resource governance in rural Australia https://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/19771 This dataset relates to the following publication. Farmers, voluntary stewardship and collaborative environmental governance in rural Australia https://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/21492&rft.creator=Lawson, Andrew &rft.creator=Martin, Paul &rft.creator=Williams, Jacqueline &rft.creator=Monk, Andrew &rft.date=2017&rft_rights=Rights holder: University of New England&rft_subject=Environmental and Natural Resources Law&rft_subject=LAW AND LEGAL STUDIES&rft_subject=LAW&rft_subject=Rural Land Policy&rft_subject=ENVIRONMENT&rft_subject=ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY, LEGISLATION AND STANDARDS&rft_subject=Environmental Policy, Legislation and Standards not elsewhere classified&rft_subject=Land Stewardship&rft.type=dataset&rft.language=English Access the data

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Andrew.Lawson@une.edu.au

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Qualitative, semi-structured interviews and surveys of Australian 23 farmers involved in voluntary stewardship programs. Qualitative, semi-structured interviews of 7 non-farmer stakeholders (animal welfare and environmental NGOs, Regional NRM body, government, researchers). Despite large financial investments by governments and farmers, as well as significant inputs of time, effort and goodwill, the ecological, social and productive capacity of the Australian rural environment is under threat. The nature of environmental problems, the limited capacity of rural communities and government constraints pose immense challenges of governance. Traditional governance measures (i.e. those centred on public laws) and purely private and self-regulatory forms seem unable to meet these challenges. This has spurred interest in collaborative modes, with the hope of combining the best of both the public and private spheres. Collaborative experiments are already underway in rural Australia, but there is a need for more empirical examination of how such arrangements work in practice. The great hopes attached to the success of collaborative governance are mostly theoretical or based on applications that may not be relevant to rural natural resources in Australia. Despite large financial investments by governments and farmers, as well as significant inputs of time, effort and goodwill, the ecological, social and productive capacity of the Australian rural environment is under threat. The nature of environmental problems, the limited capacity of rural communities and government constraints pose immense challenges of governance. Traditional governance measures (i.e. those centred on public laws) and purely private and self-regulatory forms seem unable to meet these challenges. This has spurred interest in collaborative modes, with the hope of combining the best of both the public and private spheres. Collaborative experiments are already underway in rural Australia, but there is a need for more empirical examination of how such arrangements work in practice. The great hopes attached to the success of collaborative governance are mostly theoretical or based on applications that may not be relevant to rural natural resources in Australia.
This dataset relates to the following thesis.
Farmers, voluntary stewardship programs, and collaborative natural resource governance in rural Australia https://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/19771
This dataset relates to the following publication.
Farmers, voluntary stewardship and collaborative environmental governance in rural Australia https://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/21492

Notes

Related Publications
Thesis title, Farmers, voluntary stewardship and collaborative environmental governance in rural Australia http://e-publications.une.edu.au/1959.11/21492
Funding Source
Australian Research Council - LP110100659 - (ARC NGCP New and Ongoing Projects) The next generation rural landscape governance: the Australian dimension

Issued: 2017-11-16

Date Submitted : 2017-11-16

Data time period: 2013 to 2014

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Other Information

arc : LP110100659

Identifiers