grant

The Effect of Very Premature Birth on Brain Development [ 2003 - 2005 ]

Research Grant

[Cite as http://purl.org/au-research/grants/nhmrc/237117]

Researchers: Prof Lex Doyle (Principal investigator) ,  Prof Terrie Inder A/Pr Simon Warfield

Brief description The neurological outcome of the premature infant is of major importance. Approximately 2,600 premature infants weighing less than 1500 grams are born annually in Australasia. Of the approximate 2,400 survivors between 5-15% will have a more major cerebral palsy, i.e. around 200 children per annum. A greater proportion of 25-50%, i.e., upto 1200 children will have a developmental disability that will adversely affect their school perfomance requiring special assistance or repeating grades. With an increasing number of very prematurely born infants surviving, the absolute number of affected children will continue to rise. Prevention of these disabilities will require an understanding of the cause. The educational and social implications of these high rates of neuro-developmental disability are enormous and the focus of wide international concern. Magnetic Resonance Imaging : It is a major challenge for neonatologists to be able to understand the impact of their therapies and managements on the developing brain. A window into the newborn brain can be seen utilising advanced magnetic resonance imaging techniques in-vivo to investigate these key issues: 1. What is the nature of brain injury in the prematurely born infant? 2. What are the risk factors for brain injury in the prematurely born infant - and are they able to be altered to reduce this risk - e.g. blood pressure management, steroid therapy 3. Is the brain of a prematurely born infant different from that of a full term born infant at TERM equivalent - if so, how is it different? 4. Are there certain postnatal therapies that relate to any alteration in brain structure and chemistry - e.g. postnatal nutrition, modes of ventilation, pharmacological therapies? 5. How does the brain structure relate to function on long term neuro-developmental follow up of our infants at 2 years?

Funding Amount $AUD 517,975.00

Funding Scheme NHMRC Project Grants

Notes Standard Project Grant

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