Data

Drowned dolines - the blue holes of the Pompey Reefs, Great Barrier Reef

Australian Ocean Data Network
Backshall, D.G. ; Barnett, J. ; Davies, P.J. ; Duncan, D.C. ; Harvey, N. ; Hopley, D. ; Isdale, P.J. ; Jennings, J.N. ; Moss, R.
Viewed: [[ro.stat.viewed]] Cited: [[ro.stat.cited]] Accessed: [[ro.stat.accessed]]
ctx_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info%3Aofi%2Ffmt%3Akev%3Amtx%3Adc&rfr_id=info%3Asid%2FANDS&rft_id=http://pid.geoscience.gov.au/dataset/ga/80991&rft.title=Drowned dolines - the blue holes of the Pompey Reefs, Great Barrier Reef&rft.identifier=http://pid.geoscience.gov.au/dataset/ga/80991&rft.publisher=Bureau of Mineral Resources, Geology and Geophysics&rft.description=Blue holes occur at Cockatoo and Molar Reefs, in the Pompey hard line reefs. These two holes are roughly circular in shape, between 240-295 m in diameter, and 30-40 m deep. They are completely (Cockatoo) or partially (Molar) rimmed by profuse living coral and surrounded by lagoonal depths of 5-10 m. The inner slopes of the Cockatoo blue hole are 60-70° down to a depth of 25 m, below which coalescing sediment fans markedly reduce this angle. At the Molar blue hole, slopes are mainly gentler (45°) and sediment fans and terraces occur below 16 m. Distinct biological/sedimentary associations occur in both holes. Seismic refraction studies across the rim of the blue holes show a shallow (8.5-11 m) pre-Holocene surface beneath the rims. The balance of evidence suggests that the blue holes represent collapsed dolines which may have taken more than one low sea-level period to form. The original surface structures have been modified by subaerial solution processes, and subsequent sediment infill and coral growth following the Holocene transgression.Unknown&rft.creator=Backshall, D.G. &rft.creator=Barnett, J. &rft.creator=Davies, P.J. &rft.creator=Duncan, D.C. &rft.creator=Harvey, N. &rft.creator=Hopley, D. &rft.creator=Isdale, P.J. &rft.creator=Jennings, J.N. &rft.creator=Moss, R. &rft.date=1979&rft.coverage=northlimit=-20.25; southlimit=-21.75; westlimit=150.0; eastLimit=152.0&rft.coverage=northlimit=-20.25; southlimit=-21.75; westlimit=150.0; eastLimit=152.0&rft_rights=Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International Licence http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0&rft_subject=geoscientificInformation&rft_subject=GA Publication&rft_subject=Journal&rft_subject=marine&rft_subject=QLD&rft_subject=EARTH SCIENCES&rft_subject=Published_External&rft.type=dataset&rft.language=English Access the data

Licence & Rights:

Open Licence view details
CC-BY

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International Licence
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0

Access:

Open

Contact Information

clientservices@ga.gov.au

Brief description

Blue holes occur at Cockatoo and Molar Reefs, in the Pompey hard line reefs. These two holes are roughly circular in shape, between 240-295 m in diameter, and 30-40 m deep. They are completely (Cockatoo) or partially (Molar) rimmed by profuse living coral and surrounded by lagoonal depths of 5-10 m. The inner slopes of the Cockatoo blue hole are 60-70° down to a depth of 25 m, below which coalescing sediment fans markedly reduce this angle. At the Molar blue hole, slopes are mainly gentler (45°) and sediment fans and terraces occur below 16 m. Distinct biological/sedimentary associations occur in both holes. Seismic refraction studies across the rim of the blue holes show a shallow (8.5-11 m) pre-Holocene surface beneath the rims. The balance of evidence suggests that the blue holes represent collapsed dolines which may have taken more than one low sea-level period to form. The original surface structures have been modified by subaerial solution processes, and subsequent sediment infill and coral growth following the Holocene transgression.

Lineage

Unknown

Issued: 1979

This dataset is part of a larger collection

Click to explore relationships graph

152,-20.25 152,-21.75 150,-21.75 150,-20.25 152,-20.25

151,-21

Subjects

User Contributed Tags    

Login to tag this record with meaningful keywords to make it easier to discover

Other Information
Identifiers