Data

Dataset examining cultural beliefs and ideas on nature and on digital technology of pro-environmental American and Australian digital technology users

James Cook University
Martin, Melusine
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ctx_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info%3Aofi%2Ffmt%3Akev%3Amtx%3Adc&rfr_id=info%3Asid%2FANDS&rft_id=https://research.jcu.edu.au/data/published/53316ed1fe95568aae149326658fdc16&rft.title=Dataset examining cultural beliefs and ideas on nature and on digital technology of pro-environmental American and Australian digital technology users&rft.identifier=https://research.jcu.edu.au/data/published/53316ed1fe95568aae149326658fdc16&rft.publisher=James Cook University&rft.description=The data was collected to understand modern views on nature and digital technology of pro-environmental American and Australian digital technology users. It was collected via a cross-cultural mixed methods design (sequential explanatory design). Phase 1: online survey via Survey Monkey and phase 2: Semi-structured interviews. The quantitative strand was analysed using descriptive statistics and cross-tabulations (software tools: Survey Monkey and Microsoft Excel). The qualitative strand of the study was based on a thematic analysis (Software tools: NVivo and Microsoft Excel). Files include two pdfs (a pdf of the survey answers of American participants and a pdf of the survey answers of Australian participants) as issued by Survey Monkey and including both quantitative and qualitative data, and an Excel sheet of the survey answers of the American participants.  Access to these files is not permitted due to ethical restrictions. The interview transcripts are also restricted access and have been archived in secure storage. The survey questions provide context and are available from the Data link provided.  The dataset examines how pro-environmental individuals living in the USA and in Australia perceive nature in the digital era, and how digital technology affects human relationship with nature.&rft.creator=Martin, Melusine &rft.date=2022&rft.relation=https://doi.org/10.25120/etropic.17.1.2018.3647&rft.relation=https://theconversation.com/le-besoin-de-nature-a-lere-digitale-entre-science-et-philosophie-95801&rft.coverage=&rft_rights=&rft_subject=environmental sustainability&rft_subject=human/nature dualism&rft_subject=nature-deficit disorder&rft_subject=Western culture&rft_subject=wilderness&rft_subject=Environmental Sociology&rft_subject=STUDIES IN HUMAN SOCIETY&rft_subject=SOCIOLOGY&rft_subject=Social and Cultural Anthropology&rft_subject=ANTHROPOLOGY&rft_subject=Globalisation and Culture&rft_subject=LANGUAGE, COMMUNICATION AND CULTURE&rft_subject=CULTURAL STUDIES&rft.type=dataset&rft.language=English Access the data

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Brief description

The dataset examines how pro-environmental individuals living in the USA and in Australia perceive nature in the digital era, and how digital technology affects human relationship with nature.

Full description

The data was collected to understand modern views on nature and digital technology of pro-environmental American and Australian digital technology users. It was collected via a cross-cultural mixed methods design (sequential explanatory design). Phase 1: online survey via Survey Monkey and phase 2: Semi-structured interviews. The quantitative strand was analysed using descriptive statistics and cross-tabulations (software tools: Survey Monkey and Microsoft Excel). The qualitative strand of the study was based on a thematic analysis (Software tools: NVivo and Microsoft Excel).

Files include two pdfs (a pdf of the survey answers of American participants and a pdf of the survey answers of Australian participants) as issued by Survey Monkey and including both quantitative and qualitative data, and an Excel sheet of the survey answers of the American participants. 

Access to these files is not permitted due to ethical restrictions. The interview transcripts are also restricted access and have been archived in secure storage.

The survey questions provide context and are available from the Data link provided.

 

Created: 2022-06-14

Data time period: 2018 to 30 11 2019

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Identifiers
  • Local : https://research.jcu.edu.au/data/published/53316ed1fe95568aae149326658fdc16