Data

Data for: The Role of Nocturnal Fishes on Coral Reefs: A Quantitative Functional Evaluation

James Cook University
Collins, William ; Bellwood, David ; Morais Araujo, Renato
Viewed: [[ro.stat.viewed]] Cited: [[ro.stat.cited]] Accessed: [[ro.stat.accessed]]
ctx_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info%3Aofi%2Ffmt%3Akev%3Amtx%3Adc&rfr_id=info%3Asid%2FANDS&rft_id=info:doi10.25903/devh-2h34&rft.title=Data for: The Role of Nocturnal Fishes on Coral Reefs: A Quantitative Functional Evaluation &rft.identifier=10.25903/devh-2h34&rft.publisher=James Cook University&rft.description=Data on the estimated biomass and productivity of different reef fish familes from various locations around Lizard Island, Great Barrier Reef, Australia. Abstract [Related publication]: The ecological functions of nocturnal coral reef fishes are poorly known. Yet, nocturnal resources for consumers are theoretically as abundant and productive, if not more so, than their diurnal counterparts. In this study, we quantify and contrast the energetic dynamics of nocturnal and diurnal fishes in a model coral reef ecosystem, evaluating whether they attain similar levels of biomass production. We integrated a detailed dataset of coral reef fish counts, comprising diurnal and nocturnal species, in sites sheltered and exposed to wave action. We combined somatic growth and mortality models to estimate rates of consumer biomass production, a key ecosystem function. We found that diurnal fish assemblages have a higher biomass than nocturnal fishes: 104% more in sheltered sites and 271% more in exposed sites. Differences in productivity were even more pronounced, with diurnal fishes contributing 163% more productivity in sheltered locations, and 558% more in exposed locations. Apogonidae dominated biomass production within the nocturnal fishes, comprising 54% of total nocturnal fish productivity, proportionally more than any diurnal fish family. The substantially lower contributions of nocturnal fishes to biomass and biomass production likely indicates constraints on resource accessibility. Taxa that overcome these constraints may thrive, as evidenced by apogonids. This study highlights the importance of nocturnal fishes in underpinning the flow of energy and nutrients from nocturnal resources to reef communities; a process driven mainly by small, cryptic fishes. Research data contains both the code and the data for the publication of The Role of Nocturnal Fishes on Coral Reefs: A Quantitative Functional Evaluation. The zipped file contains word documents that explain the raw data table and the KML files used to create figures. Data was analysed using RStudio and KMLs were created using Google Earth Pro.&rft.creator=Collins, William &rft.creator=Bellwood, David &rft.creator=Morais Araujo, Renato &rft.date=2022&rft.relation=https://doi.org/10.1002/ece3.9249&rft.coverage=145.453653,-14.642386 145.460865,-14.647368 145.470481,-14.654012 145.477007,-14.663976 145.479754,-14.669622 145.477694,-14.675933 145.474946,-14.681247 145.472886,-14.688221 145.467734,-14.693202 145.462926,-14.698516 145.459491,-14.703165 145.459835,-14.706154 145.451249,-14.704825 145.44541,-14.698848 145.438885,-14.69287 145.43442,-14.686892 145.433046,-14.679918 145.433733,-14.671947 145.436137,-14.662647 145.441289,-14.656337 145.447814,-14.653015 145.447814,-14.649361 145.448845,-14.644379 145.450218,-14.641722 145.453653,-14.642386&rft.coverage=Lizard Island, northern Great Barrier Reef, Queensland, Australia&rft_rights=&rft_rights=CC BY 4.0: Attribution 4.0 International http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0&rft_subject=Biomass&rft_subject=Diel habits&rft_subject=Diurnal fishes&rft_subject=Nocturnal fishes&rft_subject=Ecosystem function&rft_subject=Productivity&rft_subject=Community Ecology&rft_subject=BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES&rft_subject=ECOLOGY&rft_subject=Marine Flora, Fauna and Biodiversity&rft_subject=ENVIRONMENT&rft_subject=FLORA, FAUNA AND BIODIVERSITY&rft.type=dataset&rft.language=English Access the data

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CC BY 4.0: Attribution 4.0 International
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0

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Open: free access under license

Full description

Data on the estimated biomass and productivity of different reef fish familes from various locations around Lizard Island, Great Barrier Reef, Australia.

Abstract [Related publication]:

  1. The ecological functions of nocturnal coral reef fishes are poorly known. Yet, nocturnal resources for consumers are theoretically as abundant and productive, if not more so, than their diurnal counterparts. In this study, we quantify and contrast the energetic dynamics of nocturnal and diurnal fishes in a model coral reef ecosystem, evaluating whether they attain similar levels of biomass production.
  2. We integrated a detailed dataset of coral reef fish counts, comprising diurnal and nocturnal species, in sites sheltered and exposed to wave action. We combined somatic growth and mortality models to estimate rates of consumer biomass production, a key ecosystem function.
  3. We found that diurnal fish assemblages have a higher biomass than nocturnal fishes: 104% more in sheltered sites and 271% more in exposed sites. Differences in productivity were even more pronounced, with diurnal fishes contributing 163% more productivity in sheltered locations, and 558% more in exposed locations.
  4. Apogonidae dominated biomass production within the nocturnal fishes, comprising 54% of total nocturnal fish productivity, proportionally more than any diurnal fish family.
  5. The substantially lower contributions of nocturnal fishes to biomass and biomass production likely indicates constraints on resource accessibility. Taxa that overcome these constraints may thrive, as evidenced by apogonids. This study highlights the importance of nocturnal fishes in underpinning the flow of energy and nutrients from nocturnal resources to reef communities; a process driven mainly by small, cryptic fishes.

Research data contains both the code and the data for the publication of "The Role of Nocturnal Fishes on Coral Reefs: A Quantitative Functional Evaluation".
The zipped file contains word documents that explain the raw data table and the KML files used to create figures. Data was analysed using RStudio and KMLs were created using Google Earth Pro.

Created: 2022-09-06

Data time period: 04 2017 to 31 12 2018

This dataset is part of a larger collection

Click to explore relationships graph

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145.4564,-14.673938

Identifiers
  • Local : https://test-jcu.redboxresearchdata.com.au/data/published/a64560a0062311ed91f7d39bc702b355
  • DOI : 10.25903/devh-2h34