Data

Data accompanying: Crustose coralline algae display sensitivity to near future global ocean change scenarios

University of Tasmania, Australia
Britton, Damon
Viewed: [[ro.stat.viewed]] Cited: [[ro.stat.cited]] Accessed: [[ro.stat.accessed]]
ctx_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info%3Aofi%2Ffmt%3Akev%3Amtx%3Adc&rfr_id=info%3Asid%2FANDS&rft_id=info:doi10.25959/FMMT-QM54&rft.title=Data accompanying: Crustose coralline algae display sensitivity to near future global ocean change scenarios&rft.identifier=https://doi.org/10.25959/FMMT-QM54&rft.description=Most research investigating how ocean warming and acidification will impact marine species has focused on visually dominant species, such as kelps and corals, while ignoring visually cryptic species such as crustose coralline algae (CCA). CCA are important keystone species that provide settlement cues for invertebrate larvae and can be highly sensitive to global ocean change. However, few studies have assessed how CCA respond to low emission scenarios or conditions. In a laboratory experiment, we examined the responses of temperate CCA assemblages to combined warming and acidification projected under low, medium, and high emissions. Net calcification and net photosynthesis significantly declined in all emissions scenarios, while significant reductions in relative growth rates and increases in percentage bleaching were observed in the highest emission scenario. The negative responses of CCA to both low and medium emissions suggest that they may be adversely impacted by combined warming and acidification by 2030 if current emissions are sustained. This will have far reaching consequences for commercially important invertebrates that rely on them to induce settlement of larvae. These findings highlight the need to take rapid action to preserve these critical keystone species and the valuable services they provide.Maintenance and Update Frequency: none-plannedStatement: Please see: Britton, D., Mundy, C. N., Noisette, F., McGraw, C. M., and Hurd, C. L. 2021. Crustose coralline algae display sensitivity to near future global ocean change scenarios. ICES Journal of Marine Science, 78: 3748-3756.&rft.creator=Britton, Damon &rft.date=2015&rft.coverage=westlimit=147.0402834266424; southlimit=-43.57941084323931; eastlimit=147.6115724891424; northlimit=-42.552083713441164&rft.coverage=westlimit=147.0402834266424; southlimit=-43.57941084323931; eastlimit=147.6115724891424; northlimit=-42.552083713441164&rft_rights=The data described in this record are the intellectual property of the University of Tasmania through the Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies.&rft_rights= https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/&rft_rights=https://i.creativecommons.org/l/by/4.0/88x31.png&rft_rights=WWW:LINK-1.0-http--related&rft_rights=License Graphic&rft_rights=Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License&rft_rights=https://creativecommons.org/international/&rft_rights=WWW:LINK-1.0-http--related&rft_rights=WWW:LINK-1.0-http--related&rft_rights=License Text&rft_rights=Cite data as: Britton, D. (2021). Data accompanying: Crustose coralline algae display sensitivity to near future global ocean change scenarios [Data set]. Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies (IMAS), University of Tasmania (UTAS). https://doi.org/10.25959/FMMT-QM54&rft_rights=Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0&rft_subject=biota&rft_subject=Climate change&rft_subject=Ocean acidification&rft_subject=Ocean warming&rft_subject=CCA&rft_subject=EARTH SCIENCE | BIOSPHERE | ECOSYSTEMS | MARINE ECOSYSTEMS | BENTHIC&rft_subject=RED ALGAE&rft_subject=EARTH SCIENCE&rft_subject=BIOLOGICAL CLASSIFICATION&rft_subject=PLANTS&rft_subject=MACROALGAE (SEAWEEDS)&rft_subject=Phycology (incl. Marine Grasses)&rft_subject=BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES&rft_subject=PLANT BIOLOGY&rft_subject=Marine and Estuarine Ecology (incl. Marine Ichthyology)&rft_subject=ECOLOGY&rft.type=dataset&rft.language=English Access the data

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The data described in this record are the intellectual property of the University of Tasmania through the Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies.

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License Text

Cite data as: Britton, D. (2021). Data accompanying: Crustose coralline algae display sensitivity to near future global ocean change scenarios [Data set]. Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies (IMAS), University of Tasmania (UTAS). https://doi.org/10.25959/FMMT-QM54

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Brief description

Most research investigating how ocean warming and acidification will impact marine species has focused on visually dominant species, such as kelps and corals, while ignoring visually cryptic species such as crustose coralline algae (CCA). CCA are important keystone species that provide settlement cues for invertebrate larvae and can be highly sensitive to global ocean change. However, few studies have assessed how CCA respond to low emission scenarios or conditions. In a laboratory experiment, we examined the responses of temperate CCA assemblages to combined warming and acidification projected under low, medium, and high emissions. Net calcification and net photosynthesis significantly declined in all emissions scenarios, while significant reductions in relative growth rates and increases in percentage bleaching were observed in the highest emission scenario. The negative responses of CCA to both low and medium emissions suggest that they may be adversely impacted by combined warming and acidification by 2030 if current emissions are sustained. This will have far reaching consequences for commercially important invertebrates that rely on them to induce settlement of larvae. These findings highlight the need to take rapid action to preserve these critical keystone species and the valuable services they provide.

Lineage

Maintenance and Update Frequency: none-planned
Statement: Please see: Britton, D., Mundy, C. N., Noisette, F., McGraw, C. M., and Hurd, C. L. 2021. Crustose coralline algae display sensitivity to near future global ocean change scenarios. ICES Journal of Marine Science, 78: 3748-3756.

Data time period: 2019-02-25 to 2019-04-10

This dataset is part of a larger collection

Click to explore relationships graph

147.61157,-42.55208 147.61157,-43.57941 147.04028,-43.57941 147.04028,-42.55208 147.61157,-42.55208

147.32592795789,-43.06574727834

Other Information
(DATA ACCESS - crustose coralline algae responses to combined warming and acidification)

uri : https://data.imas.utas.edu.au/attachments/1ec2e43b-899e-40a8-a7f8-a02ea089499f/CCA_responses.csv

Identifiers