Data

Data accompanying: Adjustments in fatty acid composition is a mechanism that can explain resilience to marine heatwaves and future ocean conditions in the habitat-forming seaweed Phyllospora comosa

University of Tasmania, Australia
Britton, Damon
Viewed: [[ro.stat.viewed]] Cited: [[ro.stat.cited]] Accessed: [[ro.stat.accessed]]
ctx_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info%3Aofi%2Ffmt%3Akev%3Amtx%3Adc&rfr_id=info%3Asid%2FANDS&rft_id=info:doi10.25959/FYDA-XB84&rft.title=Data accompanying: Adjustments in fatty acid composition is a mechanism that can explain resilience to marine heatwaves and future ocean conditions in the habitat-forming seaweed Phyllospora comosa&rft.identifier=10.25959/FYDA-XB84&rft.description=Marine heatwaves are extreme events that can have profound and lasting impacts on marine species. Field observations have shown seaweeds to be highly susceptible to marine heatwaves, but the physiological drivers of this susceptibility are poorly understood. Furthermore, the effects of marine heatwaves in conjunction with ocean warming and acidification are yet to be investigated. To address this knowledge gap, we conducted a laboratory culture experiment in which we tested the growth and physiological responses of Phyllospora comosa juveniles from the southern extent of its range (43 - 31° S) to marine heatwaves, ocean warming and acidification. We used a collapsed factorial design in which marine heatwaves were superimposed on current (today's pH and temperature) and future (pH and temperature projected by 2100) ocean conditions. Responses were tested both during the heatwaves, and after a seven-day recovery period. Heatwaves reduced net photosynthetic rates in both current and future conditions, while respiration rates were elevated under heatwaves in the current conditions only. Following the recovery period, there was little evidence of heatwaves having lasting negative effects on growth, photosynthesis or respiration. Exposure to heatwaves, future ocean conditions or both caused an increase in the degree of saturation of fatty acids. This adjustment may have counteracted negative effects of elevated temperatures by decreasing membrane fluidity, which increases at higher temperatures. Furthermore, P. comosa appeared to down-regulate the energetically expensive carbon-concentrating mechanism (CCM) in the future conditions with a reduction in δ13 C values detected in these treatments. Any saved energy arising from this down-regulation was not invested in growth and was likely invested in the adjustment of fatty acid composition. This adjustment is a mechanism by which P. comosa and other seaweeds may tolerate the negative effects of ocean warming and marine heatwaves through benefits arising from ocean acidification.Maintenance and Update Frequency: unknownStatement: Laboratory culture experiment, field logger deployments.&rft.creator=Britton, Damon &rft.date=2021&rft.coverage=westlimit=147.238036998; southlimit=-43.4214544287; eastlimit=147.560302399; northlimit=-42.8320122638&rft.coverage=westlimit=147.238036998; southlimit=-43.4214544287; eastlimit=147.560302399; northlimit=-42.8320122638&rft_rights=The data described in this record are the intellectual property of the University of Tasmania through the Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies.&rft_rights= http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/&rft_rights=http://i.creativecommons.org/l/by/4.0/88x31.png&rft_rights=WWW:LINK-1.0-http--related&rft_rights=License Graphic&rft_rights=Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License&rft_rights=http://creativecommons.org/international/&rft_rights=WWW:LINK-1.0-http--related&rft_rights=WWW:LINK-1.0-http--related&rft_rights=License Text&rft_rights=Britton, D. (2021). Data accompanying: Adjustments in fatty acid composition is a mechanism that can explain resilience to marine heatwaves and future ocean conditions in the habitat-forming seaweed Phyllospora comosa. [Data set]. Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies (IMAS), University of Tasmania (UTAS). https://doi.org/10.25959/FYDA-XB84&rft_rights=Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0&rft_subject=biota&rft_subject=Fatty acids&rft_subject=Global ocean change&rft_subject=Marine heatwaves&rft_subject=Ocean acidification&rft_subject=Ocean warming&rft_subject=Physiology&rft_subject=Seaweed&rft_subject=MACROALGAE (SEAWEEDS)&rft_subject=EARTH SCIENCE&rft_subject=BIOLOGICAL CLASSIFICATION&rft_subject=PROTISTS&rft_subject=Phycology (incl. Marine Grasses)&rft_subject=BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES&rft_subject=PLANT BIOLOGY&rft_subject=Marine and Estuarine Ecology (incl. Marine Ichthyology)&rft_subject=ECOLOGY&rft_subject=Multiple physiological parameters&rft_subject=pH measurements&rft.type=dataset&rft.language=English Access the data

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The data described in this record are the intellectual property of the University of Tasmania through the Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies.

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License Text

Britton, D. (2021). Data accompanying: Adjustments in fatty acid composition is a mechanism that can explain resilience to marine heatwaves and future ocean conditions in the habitat-forming seaweed Phyllospora comosa. [Data set]. Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies (IMAS), University of Tasmania (UTAS). https://doi.org/10.25959/FYDA-XB84

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Brief description

Marine heatwaves are extreme events that can have profound and lasting impacts on marine species. Field observations have shown seaweeds to be highly susceptible to marine heatwaves, but the physiological drivers of this susceptibility are poorly understood. Furthermore, the effects of marine heatwaves in conjunction with ocean warming and acidification are yet to be investigated. To address this knowledge gap, we conducted a laboratory culture experiment in which we tested the growth and physiological responses of Phyllospora comosa juveniles from the southern extent of its range (43 - 31° S) to marine heatwaves, ocean warming and acidification. We used a "collapsed factorial design" in which marine heatwaves were superimposed on current (today's pH and temperature) and future (pH and temperature projected by 2100) ocean conditions. Responses were tested both during the heatwaves, and after a seven-day recovery period. Heatwaves reduced net photosynthetic rates in both current and future conditions, while respiration rates were elevated under heatwaves in the current conditions only. Following the recovery period, there was little evidence of heatwaves having lasting negative effects on growth, photosynthesis or respiration. Exposure to heatwaves, future ocean conditions or both caused an increase in the degree of saturation of fatty acids. This adjustment may have counteracted negative effects of elevated temperatures by decreasing membrane fluidity, which increases at higher temperatures. Furthermore, P. comosa appeared to down-regulate the energetically expensive carbon-concentrating mechanism (CCM) in the future conditions with a reduction in δ13 C values detected in these treatments. Any saved energy arising from this down-regulation was not invested in growth and was likely invested in the adjustment of fatty acid composition. This adjustment is a mechanism by which P. comosa and other seaweeds may tolerate the negative effects of ocean warming and marine heatwaves through benefits arising from ocean acidification.

Lineage

Maintenance and Update Frequency: unknown
Statement: Laboratory culture experiment, field logger deployments.

Created: 2021-05-17

Data time period: 2018-01-01 to 2018-08-04

This dataset is part of a larger collection

Click to explore relationships graph

147.5603,-42.83201 147.5603,-43.42145 147.23804,-43.42145 147.23804,-42.83201 147.5603,-42.83201

147.3991696985,-43.12673334625

Other Information
(DATA ACCESS - laboratory culture experiment under heatwave scenarios - physiological measurements [Britton_et_al_experiment_data.xlsx])

uri : https://data.imas.utas.edu.au/attachments/cda9c168-d408-48fd-8667-dd6d4fb21129/Britton_et_al_experiment_data.xlsx

(DATA ACCESS - field measurements of pH from loggers [Field_pH.xlsx])

uri : https://data.imas.utas.edu.au/attachments/cda9c168-d408-48fd-8667-dd6d4fb21129/Field_pH.xlsx

(DATA ACCESS - pH measurements in laboratory experiment under heatwave scenarios [pH_data_experiment.xlsx])

uri : https://data.imas.utas.edu.au/attachments/cda9c168-d408-48fd-8667-dd6d4fb21129/pH_data_experiment.xlsx

(SUPPLEMENTARY INFO - logged temperature data from temperature laboratory manipulation experiment [Temp_data_experiment.xlsx])

uri : https://data.imas.utas.edu.au/attachments/cda9c168-d408-48fd-8667-dd6d4fb21129/Temp_data_experiment.xlsx

Identifiers