Dataset
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ctx_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info%3Aofi%2Ffmt%3Akev%3Amtx%3Adc&rfr_id=info%3Asid%2FANDS&rft_id=1959.1/470455&rft.title=Cloud seeding: data&rft.identifier=1959.1/470455&rft.publisher=Monash University&rft.description=This synthesised rainfall dataset 1960-2005 is an output of an ARC Linkage Project, 2005-2009, which builds on an ongoing collaboration between Monash University researchers with Hydro Tasmania. Steven Siems, Anthony Morrison (Monash University) and Alex Nazarov (Hydro Tasmania) collected the data while Michael Manton(Monash University) has collaborated with analysis and publishing of data in publications. The historical context worked very well. The data was very easily accessible. Researchers looked at the surface rainfall from the Bureau of Meteorology network of weather stations across Tasmania. Surface rainfall data was supplemented with the rain gauge records (including high country) from Hydro Tasmania. A simple statistical analysis on the monthly rainfall data and the periods of cloud seeding resulted in the conclusion that there was an improvement in the monthly rainfall. It was a statistically significant result in relation to 46 years of data. The second part of the project involved a meteorological investigation where researchers flew on the aircraft to undertake case studies by trying to simulate the right environment and learn from the conditions which they observed. There was also analysis of further datasets: radar data from the Bureau of Meteorology, satellite data and aircraft data related to cloud seeding, aircraft observation and surface observation. This is the first time an independent analysis of cloud seeding data over several decades has shown a statistically significant increase in rainfall. Although there could be other explanations for the increased rainfall, the data indicates that cloud seeding is a significant contributor and provides a unique data set that may ultimately help demonstrate that cloud seeding can be viable over an economically meaningful area. Hydro Tasmania now has evidence about precipitation events that will allow optimization of their cloud-seeding operation.&rft.creator=Assoc Prof Steven Siems&rft.creator=Mr Anthony Morrison&rft.date=2009&rft.relation=10.1175/2008JAMC2068.1&rft.relation=10.1175/2009MWR3011.1 &rft.relation=10.1175/2010JCLI3842.1&rft.relation=http://www.amos.org.au/documents/item/426&rft.relation=http://arrow.monash.edu.au/hdl/1959.1/192123&rft.coverage=AU-TAS&rft_rights=All rights reserved except by negotiation&rft_rights=&rft_subject=040105 &rft_subject=040106 &rft_subject=Meteorology&rft_subject=EARTH SCIENCES&rft_subject=ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES&rft_subject=Cloud seeding&rft_subject=Precipitation&rft_subject=Supercooled liquid water&rft_subject=Cloud dynamic phase&rft.type=dataset&rft.language=English Access the data

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Full description

This synthesised rainfall dataset 1960-2005 is an output of an ARC Linkage Project, 2005-2009, which builds on an ongoing collaboration between Monash University researchers with Hydro Tasmania. Steven Siems, Anthony Morrison (Monash University) and Alex Nazarov (Hydro Tasmania) collected the data while Michael Manton(Monash University) has collaborated with analysis and publishing of data in publications. The historical context worked very well. The data was very easily accessible. Researchers looked at the surface rainfall from the Bureau of Meteorology network of weather stations across Tasmania. Surface rainfall data was supplemented with the rain gauge records (including high country) from Hydro Tasmania. A simple statistical analysis on the monthly rainfall data and the periods of cloud seeding resulted in the conclusion that there was an improvement in the monthly rainfall. It was a statistically significant result in relation to 46 years of data. The second part of the project involved a meteorological investigation where researchers flew on the aircraft to undertake case studies by trying to simulate the right environment and learn from the conditions which they observed. There was also analysis of further datasets: radar data from the Bureau of Meteorology, satellite data and aircraft data related to cloud seeding, aircraft observation and surface observation.

Notes

Rainfall data (ASCII); synthesized rainfall data; the seeding mass; (approximately 1 MB); Could link to the radar data and the satellite data.

Significance statement

This is the first time an independent analysis of cloud seeding data over several decades has shown a statistically significant increase in rainfall. Although there could be other explanations for the increased rainfall, the data indicates that cloud seeding is a significant contributor and provides a unique data set that may ultimately help demonstrate that cloud seeding can be viable over an economically meaningful area. Hydro Tasmania now has evidence about precipitation events that will allow optimization of their cloud-seeding operation.

Created: 2005 to 2009

Data time period: 1960 to 2005

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Spatial Coverage And Location

iso31662: AU-TAS

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