Data

Chemical microenvironment within complex multispecies macroalgae assemblages

Australian Ocean Data Network
Layton, Cayne ; Cameron, Matthew ; Shelamoff, Victor ; Fernández, Pamela ; Britton, Damon ; Hurd, Catriona ; Wright, Jeffrey, Dr ; Johnson, Craig, Prof.
Viewed: [[ro.stat.viewed]] Cited: [[ro.stat.cited]] Accessed: [[ro.stat.accessed]]
ctx_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info%3Aofi%2Ffmt%3Akev%3Amtx%3Adc&rfr_id=info%3Asid%2FANDS&rft_id=info:doi10.25959/5c521ec4bea36&rft.title=Chemical microenvironment within complex multispecies macroalgae assemblages&rft.identifier=10.25959/5c521ec4bea36&rft.description=-- Layton et al. Chemical microenvironments within macroalgal assemblages: implications for the inhibition of kelp recruitment by turf algae. Limnology & Oceanography. DOI:10.1002/lno.11138 -- Kelp forests around the world are under increasing pressure from anthropogenic stressors. A widespread consequence is that in many places, complex and highly productive kelp habitats have been replaced by structurally simple and less productive turf algae habitats. Turf algae habitats resist re-establishment of kelp via recruitment inhibition; however little is known about the specific mechanisms involved. One potential factor is the chemical environment within the turf algae and into which kelp propagules settle and develop. Using laboratory trials, we illustrate that the chemical microenvironment (O2 concentration and pH) 0.0–50 mm above the benthos within four multispecies macroalgal assemblages (including a turf-sediment assemblage and an Ecklonia radiata kelp-dominated assemblage) are characterised by elevated O2 and pH relative to the surrounding seawater. Notably however, O2 and pH were significantly higher within turf-sediment assemblages than in kelp-dominated assemblages, and at levels that have previously been demonstrated to impair the photosynthetic or physiological capacity of kelp propagules. Field observations of the experimental assemblages confirmed that recruitment of kelp was significantly lower into treatments with dense turf algae than in the kelp-dominated assemblages. We demonstrate differences between the chemical microenvironments of kelp and turf algae assemblages that correlate with differences in kelp recruitment, highlighting how degradation of kelp habitats might result in the persistence of turf algae habitats and the localised absence of kelp.see associated paper -- Layton et al. 2019, Chemical microenvironments within macroalgal assemblages: implications for the inhibition of kelp recruitment by turf algae, Limnology & Oceanography, DOI:10.1002/lno.11138&rft.creator=Layton, Cayne &rft.creator=Cameron, Matthew &rft.creator=Shelamoff, Victor &rft.creator=Fernández, Pamela &rft.creator=Britton, Damon &rft.creator=Hurd, Catriona &rft.creator=Wright, Jeffrey, Dr &rft.creator=Johnson, Craig, Prof. &rft.date=2019&rft.coverage=northlimit=-43.1; southlimit=-43.15; westlimit=147.93; eastLimit=147.97&rft.coverage=northlimit=-43.1; southlimit=-43.15; westlimit=147.93; eastLimit=147.97&rft_rights=Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0&rft_subject=biota&rft_subject=Temperate Reef&rft_subject=COMMUNITY DYNAMICS&rft_subject=EARTH SCIENCE&rft_subject=BIOSPHERE&rft_subject=ECOLOGICAL DYNAMICS&rft_subject=EARTH SCIENCE | BIOSPHERE | ECOSYSTEMS | MARINE ECOSYSTEMS | COASTAL | KELP FOREST&rft_subject=RED ALGAE&rft_subject=BIOLOGICAL CLASSIFICATION&rft_subject=PLANTS&rft_subject=MACROALGAE (SEAWEEDS)&rft_subject=BROWN ALGAE&rft_subject=GREEN ALGAE&rft_subject=SEDIMENT CHEMISTRY&rft_subject=OCEANS&rft_subject=MARINE SEDIMENTS&rft_subject=CARBON DIOXIDE&rft_subject=OCEAN CHEMISTRY&rft_subject=OXYGEN&rft_subject=PH&rft_subject=SPECIES RECRUITMENT&rft_subject=PHOTOSYNTHESIS&rft_subject=ECOSYSTEM FUNCTIONS&rft_subject=Phycology (incl. Marine Grasses)&rft_subject=BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES&rft_subject=PLANT BIOLOGY&rft_subject=Marine and Estuarine Ecology (incl. Marine Ichthyology)&rft_subject=ECOLOGY&rft_subject=Concentration of oxygen {O2} per unit volume of the water body&rft_subject=pH (total scale) of the water body&rft_subject=depth of turf-sediment matrix&rft_subject=Recruitment of Stage 1 juvenile kelp per paver&rft_subject=macroalgae biomass by species name&rft_subject=water flow within flume&rft.type=dataset&rft.language=English Access the data

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Brief description

-- Layton et al. Chemical microenvironments within macroalgal assemblages: implications for the inhibition of kelp recruitment by turf algae. Limnology & Oceanography. DOI:10.1002/lno.11138 --

Kelp forests around the world are under increasing pressure from anthropogenic stressors. A widespread consequence is that in many places, complex and highly productive kelp habitats have been replaced by structurally simple and less productive turf algae habitats. Turf algae habitats resist re-establishment of kelp via recruitment inhibition; however little is known about the specific mechanisms involved. One potential factor is the chemical environment within the turf algae and into which kelp propagules settle and develop. Using laboratory trials, we illustrate that the chemical microenvironment (O2 concentration and pH) 0.0–50 mm above the benthos within four multispecies macroalgal assemblages (including a turf-sediment assemblage and an Ecklonia radiata kelp-dominated assemblage) are characterised by elevated O2 and pH relative to the surrounding seawater. Notably however, O2 and pH were significantly higher within turf-sediment assemblages than in kelp-dominated assemblages, and at levels that have previously been demonstrated to impair the photosynthetic or physiological capacity of kelp propagules. Field observations of the experimental assemblages confirmed that recruitment of kelp was significantly lower into treatments with dense turf algae than in the kelp-dominated assemblages. We demonstrate differences between the chemical microenvironments of kelp and turf algae assemblages that correlate with differences in kelp recruitment, highlighting how degradation of kelp habitats might result in the persistence of turf algae habitats and the localised absence of kelp.

Lineage

see associated paper -- Layton et al. 2019, Chemical microenvironments within macroalgal assemblages: implications for the inhibition of kelp recruitment by turf algae, Limnology & Oceanography, DOI:10.1002/lno.11138

Created: 2019-01-22

Data time period: 2015-06-15 to 2016-02-28

This dataset is part of a larger collection

Click to explore relationships graph

147.97,-43.1 147.97,-43.15 147.93,-43.15 147.93,-43.1 147.97,-43.1

147.95,-43.125

Other Information
(DATA ACCESS - chemical microenvironment within macroalgal communities [direct download])

uri : https://data.imas.utas.edu.au/attachments/ffb04265-eb2a-4eea-943f-ef4cd2dd9531/LAYTON_microprobe_dataset.xlsx

Identifiers