Dataset

Beagle Gulf Mooring (NRSBEG) Automated Marine Weather And Oceanographic Station

Australian Ocean Data Network
509 linked Records:
Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS)
Viewed: [[ro.stat.viewed]] Cited: [[ro.stat.cited]] Accessed: [[ro.stat.accessed]]
ctx_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info%3Aofi%2Ffmt%3Akev%3Amtx%3Adc&rfr_id=info%3Asid%2FANDS&rft_id=info:doi10.25845/5c09bf93f315d&rft.title=Beagle Gulf Mooring (NRSBEG) Automated Marine Weather And Oceanographic Station&rft.identifier=https://doi.org/10.25845/5c09bf93f315d&rft.publisher=Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS)&rft.description=The Beagle Gulf Surface Buoy was deployed from May 2015 to July, 2017. The nearby Darwin mooring (NRSDAR) provides ongoing observations in this region. \n Data recorded: Air Pressure, Air Temperature, Current, Depth, Dissolved Oxygen, Fluorescence, Humidity, Light, Rain, Salinity, Turbidity, Water Temperature, Wave and Wind Speed and Direction.\n The Beagle Gulf mooring extended seaward oceanographic observations from Darwin Harbour and complemented the National Reference Station located at Channel Marker Buoy#5. The mooring was upgraded to near real time in September 2014. Channel marker number 5 was removed in February 2015, resulting in the mooring being moved to Channel marker 1. For full instrumentation specifications see the informaition recorded for each deployment at link https://www.aims.gov.au/imosmoorings/\n The marine observing systems deliver the information needed to support the development and operational management of ports and harbours. Most ports and harbours are multi-use regions supporting industry and recreational activities, and observing systems play an important role in both port operations, and in generating understanding of processes that impact the sustainable use and development of these areas (e.g. sediment transport, water quality). Water current profiles and wave measurements directly assist shipping operations and feed into a model that seeks to evaluate impacts on the health of the harbour.\n The NRS Darwin mooring (IMOS platform code: NRSDAR), is one of 9 IMOS ANMN National Reference Stations (NRS) designed to monitor oceanographic phenomena in Australian coastal ocean waters. The NRSDAR buoy is deployed at Latitude: -12.3382, Longitude: 130.6952.\n The IMOS national reference stations will extend the number of long term time series observations in Australian coastal waters in terms of variables recorded both in their temporal distribution and geographical extent. It will also provide for biological, physical and chemical sampling and for 'ground truth' of remotely sensed observations.\n IMOS is an Australian Government initiative established under the National Collaborative Research Infrastructure Strategy and the Super Science Initiative and supported by Queensland and Western Australian State Governments.\nStatement: National Reference Stations: \n \nAt the Darwin national reference station, a mooring has been deployed with sensors for conductivity, temperature, depth, dissolved oxygen, photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), fluorescence and measurement of turbidity at two depths - near surface and near sea bed. At the seafloor, an Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) has been deployed. Reference stations telemeter a reduced data set via Iridium satellite or nextG for real time monitoring. \n \nPhysical sampling is undertaken at each of the reference stations on a monthly or quarterly basis. The physical samples are analysed for nutrients, plankton species, both visibly and genetically, and pCO2. Biological sampling will greatly improve Australia's capability to meet its obligations for ecosystem based management and allow many researchers the opportunity to investigate possible long term changes in ecology that are likely to be linked to climate variability and wide scale validation of remotely sensed (satellite) observations of plant biomass. \nScope Level Description: IMOS Sub-Facility platform level record \n&rft.creator=Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS) &rft.date=2015&rft.coverage=northlimit=-12.3382; southlimit=-12.3382; westlimit=130.6952; eastLimit=130.6952&rft.coverage=northlimit=-12.3382; southlimit=-12.3382; westlimit=130.6952; eastLimit=130.6952&rft_rights=Attribution 3.0 Australia http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/au/&rft_rights=Format for citation of metadata sourced from Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS) in a list of reference is as follows: Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS). (2015). Northern Australia Automated Marine Weather and Oceanographic Stations, Sites: [Beagle Gulf]. https://doi.org/10.25845/5c09bf93f315d, accessed[date-of-access].&rft_subject=oceans&rft.type=dataset&rft.language=English Access the data

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Attribution 3.0 Australia
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/au/

Format for citation of metadata sourced from Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS) in a list of reference is as follows: "Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS). (2015). Northern Australia Automated Marine Weather and Oceanographic Stations, Sites: [Beagle Gulf]. https://doi.org/10.25845/5c09bf93f315d, accessed[date-of-access]".

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Brief description

The Beagle Gulf Surface Buoy was deployed from May 2015 to July, 2017. The nearby Darwin mooring (NRSDAR) provides ongoing observations in this region. \n Data recorded: Air Pressure, Air Temperature, Current, Depth, Dissolved Oxygen, Fluorescence, Humidity, Light, Rain, Salinity, Turbidity, Water Temperature, Wave and Wind Speed and Direction.\n The Beagle Gulf mooring extended seaward oceanographic observations from Darwin Harbour and complemented the National Reference Station located at Channel Marker Buoy#5. The mooring was upgraded to near real time in September 2014. Channel marker number 5 was removed in February 2015, resulting in the mooring being moved to Channel marker 1. For full instrumentation specifications see the informaition recorded for each deployment at link https://www.aims.gov.au/imosmoorings/\n The marine observing systems deliver the information needed to support the development and operational management of ports and harbours. Most ports and harbours are multi-use regions supporting industry and recreational activities, and observing systems play an important role in both port operations, and in generating understanding of processes that impact the sustainable use and development of these areas (e.g. sediment transport, water quality). Water current profiles and wave measurements directly assist shipping operations and feed into a model that seeks to evaluate impacts on the health of the harbour.\n The NRS Darwin mooring (IMOS platform code: NRSDAR), is one of 9 IMOS ANMN National Reference Stations (NRS) designed to monitor oceanographic phenomena in Australian coastal ocean waters. The NRSDAR buoy is deployed at Latitude: -12.3382, Longitude: 130.6952.\n The IMOS national reference stations will extend the number of long term time series observations in Australian coastal waters in terms of variables recorded both in their temporal distribution and geographical extent. It will also provide for biological, physical and chemical sampling and for 'ground truth' of remotely sensed observations.\n IMOS is an Australian Government initiative established under the National Collaborative Research Infrastructure Strategy and the Super Science Initiative and supported by Queensland and Western Australian State Governments.\n

Notes

Steinberg, Craig R, Mr (Point Of Contact)

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Statement: National Reference Stations: \n \nAt the Darwin national reference station, a mooring has been deployed with sensors for conductivity, temperature, depth, dissolved oxygen, photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), fluorescence and measurement of turbidity at two depths - near surface and near sea bed. At the seafloor, an Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) has been deployed. Reference stations telemeter a reduced data set via Iridium satellite or nextG for real time monitoring. \n \nPhysical sampling is undertaken at each of the reference stations on a monthly or quarterly basis. The physical samples are analysed for nutrients, plankton species, both visibly and genetically, and pCO2. Biological sampling will greatly improve Australia's capability to meet its obligations for ecosystem based management and allow many researchers the opportunity to investigate possible long term changes in ecology that are likely to be linked to climate variability and wide scale validation of remotely sensed (satellite) observations of plant biomass. \nScope Level Description: IMOS Sub-Facility platform level record \n

Modified: 20200629

Data time period: 2015-05-24 to 2017-07-16

This dataset is part of a larger collection

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130.6952,-12.3382

130.6952,-12.3382

text: northlimit=-12.3382; southlimit=-12.3382; westlimit=130.6952; eastLimit=130.6952

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oceans |

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