Data

Associated invertebrate diversity from 11 sponge species in shallow tropical and temperate reefs

Australian Ocean Data Network
Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS)
Viewed: [[ro.stat.viewed]] Cited: [[ro.stat.cited]] Accessed: [[ro.stat.accessed]]
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CC-BY

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Australia License
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0

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Contact Information

reception@aims.gov.au
adc@aims.gov.au

Brief description

Samples of sponges were collected to assess the differences in abundance and diversity of invetebrate taxa from Ningaloo Reef (tropical) and Rottnest Island (temperate), Western Australia. The immediate habitat and substrate were sampled to assess any differences in faunal communities from surrounding habitats to sponge-associated fauna. Invertebrate communities were quantified from 11 sponge species across eight functional morphologies, and a total of 3966 individuals from 125 taxa were extracted. Four out of the 11 sponges supported higher fauna abundance compared to their surrounding substrate.\n Photographs of the sponges were taken in situ prior to collection with a numbered calico bag being placed over the entire sponge. A flat blade scraper was used to remove the sponge from the substrate and then sealed underwater. Sponge size (volume), % of internal space, minimum diameter of internal space, and gross morphological complexity were determined. \n Substrate type included sand, rubble, consolidated reef and macroalgae. See Chin etal (2020) for further descriptions of the methods and materials. \n

Lineage

All the data used in this study is available in the journal paper: Chin YY, Prince J, Kendrick G, Abdul Wahab MA (2020) Sponges in shallow tropical and temperate reefs are important habitats for marine invertebrate biodiversity. Marine Biology 167:164\n

Notes

Credit
Chin YY. University of Western Australia (UWA)
Credit
Prince J. (UWA)
Credit
Kendrick G. (UWA)
Credit
Abdul Wahab MA. Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS)

Modified: 09 02 2022

Click to explore relationships graph

113.638915988,-22.662646002717

113.638915988,-22.662646002717

115.52911758347,-32.027457437193

115.52911758347,-32.027457437193

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text: northlimit=-32.02745743719314; southlimit=-32.02745743719314; westlimit=115.52911758346731; eastLimit=115.52911758346731

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Other Information
Chin YY, Prince J, Kendrick G, Abdul Wahab MA (2020) Sponges in shallow tropical and temperate reefs are important habitats for marine invertebrate biodiversity. Marine Biology 167:164

uri : http://epubs.aims.gov.au/handle/11068/16458

Identifiers
  • global : 62090713-cd84-4d4f-a5f3-0e5fcb87b35c