Data

Algae associated with coral degradation affects risk assessment in coral reef fishes

James Cook University
McCormick, M
Viewed: [[ro.stat.viewed]] Cited: [[ro.stat.cited]] Accessed: [[ro.stat.accessed]]
ctx_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info%3Aofi%2Ffmt%3Akev%3Amtx%3Adc&rfr_id=info%3Asid%2FANDS&rft_id=info:doi10.4225/28/59b89728339a9&rft.title=Algae associated with coral degradation affects risk assessment in coral reef fishes&rft.identifier=10.4225/28/59b89728339a9&rft.publisher=James Cook University&rft.description=Habitat degradation alters the chemical landscape through which information about community dynamics is transmitted. Olfactory information is crucial for risk assessment in aquatic organisms as predators release odours when they capture prey that lead to an alarm response in conspecific prey. Recent studies show some coral reef fishes are not unable to use alarm odours when surrounded by dead-degraded coral. Our study examines the spatial and temporal dynamics of this alarm odour-nullifying effect, and which substratum types may be responsible. Field experiments showed that settlement-stage damselfish were not able to detect alarm odours within 2 m downcurrent of degraded coral, and that the antipredator response was re-established 20 - 40 min after transferral to live coral. Laboratory experiments indicate that the chemicals from common components of the degraded habitats, the cyanobacteria, Okeania sp., and diatom, Pseudo-nitzschia sp., prevented an alarm odour response. The same nullifying effect was found for the common red algae, Galaxauria robusta, suggesting that the problem is of a broader nature than previously realised. Those fish species best able to compensate for a lack of olfactory risk information at key times will be those potentially most resilient to the effects of coral degradation that operate through this mechanism. &rft.creator=McCormick, M &rft.date=2017&rft.relation=http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-017-17197-1&rft.coverage=145.44407058715,-14.685381592282 145.44368509581,-14.685019848306 145.44320291175,-14.684791041037 145.44267123451,-14.684717568161 145.44214210837,-14.68480662187 145.44166732787,-14.68504948478 145.44129336784,-14.685422383319 145.4410568341,-14.685888815028 145.44098088021,-14.686403121882 145.44107294106,-14.686914959789 145.44132400511,-14.687374226675 145.44170949646,-14.687735966755 145.44219168051,-14.687964770942 145.44272335775,-14.688038242727 145.4432524839,-14.687949190334 145.44372726439,-14.687706330646 145.44410122442,-14.687333436002 145.44433775817,-14.686867007375 145.44441371206,-14.686352701612 145.4443216512,-14.685840862389 145.44407058715,-14.685381592282&rft.coverage=Lizard Island, Queensland, Australia&rft_rights=&rft_rights=CC BY-NC-ND: Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivatives 3.0 AU http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/au&rft_subject=chemical alarm odours&rft_subject=climate change&rft_subject=Coral reef fish&rft_subject=predator-prey&rft_subject=risk assessment&rft_subject=ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies&rft_subject=Marine and Estuarine Ecology (incl. Marine Ichthyology)&rft_subject=BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES&rft_subject=ECOLOGY&rft_subject=Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences&rft_subject=EXPANDING KNOWLEDGE&rft_subject=EXPANDING KNOWLEDGE&rft.type=dataset&rft.language=English Access the data

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CC BY-NC-ND: Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivatives 3.0 AU
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/au

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Full description

Habitat degradation alters the chemical landscape through which information about community dynamics is transmitted. Olfactory information is crucial for risk assessment in aquatic organisms as predators release odours when they capture prey that lead to an alarm response in conspecific prey. Recent studies show some coral reef fishes are not unable to use alarm odours when surrounded by dead-degraded coral. Our study examines the spatial and temporal dynamics of this alarm odour-nullifying effect, and which substratum types may be responsible. Field experiments showed that settlement-stage damselfish were not able to detect alarm odours within 2 m downcurrent of degraded coral, and that the antipredator response was re-established 20 - 40 min after transferral to live coral. Laboratory experiments indicate that the chemicals from common components of the degraded habitats, the cyanobacteria, Okeania sp., and diatom, Pseudo-nitzschia sp., prevented an alarm odour response. The same nullifying effect was found for the common red algae, Galaxauria robusta, suggesting that the problem is of a broader nature than previously realised. Those fish species best able to compensate for a lack of olfactory risk information at key times will be those potentially most resilient to the effects of coral degradation that operate through this mechanism.

 

Notes

This dataset is available as a spreadsheet in MS Excel (.xlsx) and Open Document formats (.ods)

Created: 2017-09-13

Data time period: 25 10 2016 to 09 12 2016

This dataset is part of a larger collection

Click to explore relationships graph

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145.44269729614,-14.686377905444

Identifiers
  • Local : 8d5cde4be0db2a2e8ca71f503be228d2
  • Local : https://research.jcu.edu.au/data/published/0028220d3d6c414e793c4fde1bf0d1cc
  • DOI : 10.4225/28/59b89728339a9